Farm Science Review

Farm Science Review will be a virtual show in 2020

For the first time in its nearly 60-year history, The Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review, scheduled for Sept. 22 to Sept. 24, will not be held in-person. Instead, a virtual show will be implemented for 2020.

The farm show, sponsored by Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), annually attracts over 100,000 visitors from all over the United States and Canada to the show site in London, Ohio.

“We are committed to delivering a robust and innovative virtual show in support of agriculture during this pandemic,” said Cathann A. Kress, vice president and dean of CFAES.

“Throughout its history, the Farm Science Review has been at the forefront of showcasing the future of agriculture,” she said. “While it may look different in 2020, we will continue to meet the needs of our growers and partners through access to exhibitors, virtual demonstrations, and education
about the most recent advancements in agricultural production.”

The three-day event normally allows agricultural producers to peruse 4,000 product lines from 600 commercial exhibitors, view field demonstrations, and learn the latest in agricultural production. Popular educational programs feature specialists from The Ohio State University, Central State University, and other land-grant institutions.

“Due to the rapidly changing conditions in the spread of COVID-19 across the U.S., the decision was made to hold a virtual show,” said Nick Zachrich, Farm Science Review manager. “We have worked diligently to plan for another incredible show demonstrating the newest developments in equipment, research, and application to support agricultural production.”

Current conditions are not conducive to hosting an in-person event. “With our multigenerational audience, we determined a need to prioritize everyone’s health and ensure that we are doing our
part to contain the spread of the virus during this global pandemic,” he said.

While extremely disappointing for everyone involved, Zachrich said that Farm Science Review management and its executive committee believe this is the right decision to keep visitors,
exhibitors, partners, and staff safe.

In addition, the State of Ohio Responsible Restart guidelines currently limit mass gatherings. There is little reason to anticipate changes in the next two months that would provide for the
ability to meet Farm Science Review’s daily in-person attendance of between 35,000 to 50,000 visitors.

“We understood early on that regardless of the number of cases, the show would have to take a drastically different approach in order to meet the health and safety requirements for COVID-
19, such as physical distancing and sanitization,” Zachrich said. “While we would have liked to wait until closer to the event to make a decision, we felt compelled to let suppliers, exhibitors, and partners know so they can begin to plan for a virtual show.”

More information will be shared in the forthcoming weeks about the 2020 virtual Farm Science Review program and how to engage. Visit fsr.osu.edu for ongoing updates.

All media inquiries should be directed to Sherrie Whaley, CFAES media relations coordinator,

whaley.3@osu.edu, 614-292-2137.
Writer:
Sherrie R. Whaley whaley.3@osu.edu
614-292-2137 / 614-582-6111

Source:
Nick Zachrich
zachrich.13@osu.edu

Free virtual Quality Assurance training for Highland County 4-H and FFA members

Free on-line Quality Assurance will be offered to Highland County 4-H and FFA members via Zoom. You must register no later than 48 hours prior in-order to attend the training. Each training is limited to 40 families. You can register the entire family at one time.

The following are dates  and times QA is currently being offered:

June 3, 2020 at 10:00 a.m.
June 4, 2020 at 10:00 a.m.
June 10, 2020 at 10:00 a.m.
June 11, 2020 at 3:00 p.m.

Approximately 24 hours before the webinar, you will receive a Zoom link to connect to the webinar from Kathy Bruynis. The link will be sent from bruynis.5@osu.edu. Training will be limited to a maximum of 40 families per session. Families only need to register once if all family members will be participating at the same time. Make sure to list all family members first and last name participating in the registration form.

 

Please register at the link below no later than 48 hours before the session you would like to attend.

 

https://osu.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1FgQkREt9lALvLv

 

For more information contact Kathy Bruynis at bruynis.5@osu.edu or 937-393-1918

10 Principals of Twenty-First Century Leadership

Leadership Moments

 

10 Principles of Twenty-First Century Leadership

From:  Strock, J. (2019).  Serve to lead 2.0: 21st century leaders manual.  Serve to Lead Group https://servetolead.org

 

 

  1. “Everybody can lead, because anyone can serve.
  2. The most valuable resource of any enterprise is its people.
  3. We are in transition from a transaction-based world to a relationship-based world.
  4. Leadership is a relationship between empowered, consenting adults.
  5. Leadership is a dynamic relationship.
  6. There is no universal leadership style.
  7. Leadership roles are converging.
  8. A leader’s unique task is to imagine and advance a vision.
  9. Love is the highest level of leadership relationship.
  10. Character is a competitive advantage (p.67-68).”

 

 

The OSU Leadership Center invites you to check out our offerings during these times of uncertainty.  Click here for more information.

 

Are you tired of cooking and the costs of groceries? Here are some tips to help.

Leeanna McKamey

SNAP-Ed Program Assistant

Ohio State University Extension, Highland County

 

  • Look in your cabinets and see what you already have. Then use those items to help make out meals for the rest of the week.  Do this as a family.  The more input everyone gives, the more they will enjoy the meals.  When planning meals, remember to try and include all five food groups.  Fruits, Dairy, Protein, Grains and Vegetables.
  • Include meals that you can combine food groups. Look up easy recipes online.  Soup and stews are a great way to add more vegetables and grains while using less meat proteins which are expensive.  If your family struggles with eating dairy and fruits, put low-fat yogurt and a can of fruit in the mixer, then freeze for a cold treat.
  • Before going to the grocery ALWAYS make out your grocery list and stick to it. Stay out of aisles that don’t contain items on your list.  If your budget allows, add ONE item that your family loves that you haven’t had for a while.
  • Check for sales and coupons online and in the paper.
  • Make meals a positive time together. Encourage everyone to help and enjoy this time together.

 

Below is a fun recipe that is easy to make:

 

Scrambled Eggs in a Mug

Servings 1 | Prep time 5 mins. | Total time 7 mins.

Equipment: Microwave-safe mug or small bowl, Cutting board

Utensils: Fork or whisk, knife

 

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon unsalted butter

1 large egg

1 ½ tablespoons low-fat milk

Pinch of salt

Pinch of black pepper

¼ cup fresh, diced, mixed vegetables (halved grape tomatoes, broccoli, peppers and onion)

½ piece of bread torn into small pieces (optional)

1 tablespoon shredded cheese (e.g., cheddar cheese, mozzarella, etc.)

 

Nutritional Information:

Calories 200

Total Fat 12g

Sodium 510mg

Total Carbs 12g

Protein 12g

 

Instructions:

  1. Before you begin, wash your hands, surfaces, utensils, and produce.
  2. In a microwave-safe mug or bowl, microwave butter for 10 seconds or just until melted. Add egg, salt, and pepper and whisk vigorously until thoroughly combined and egg white is incorporated.
  3. Add vegetables, bread (if using), and shredded cheese and stir all together. Make sure ingredients are evenly dispersed and have not settled to bottom of mug.
  4. Place mug or bowl into microwave and cook on high for one minute.
  5. Remove mug or bowl, stir with a fork, and microwave on high for an additional minute. Serve immediately.