Kline joins the Center for Cooperative Team

 

Ryan Kline will be the new Cooperative Development Specialist for the CFAES Center for Cooperatives.  Kline will be collaborating with staff at OSU South Centers, Ohio State University Extension, West Virginia University Extension Services, USDA Rural Development, and other rural economic development organizations to create and deploy programming to support the mission, goals, and priorities of the Center. Kline’s previous experience working with county extension offices, private foundations, and museums, helped him to develop a passion for collaboration, youth, and economic development, and forming new programs to educate leaders in agriculture. Ryan is excited to join a dynamic team that strives for the development and support of cooperatives across the region.

Kline has been active in agriculture, including 4-H and FFA his entire life. Born and raised on a fifth-generation family farm in Ross County, Ohio, and Appalachian agriculture deeply impacted his personal and professional life. In college, his passion for agriculture and history joined. In the Spring of 2020, Kline received his Master’s degree in History at Auburn University, focusing on the history of Agriculture and Labor.  He also received his BA in History at Ohio University.

You can reach Ryan at kline.375@osu.edu or at 740.289.2071.

 

Cooperatives Eligible to Receive COVID-19 Assistance

 

Cooperative businesses experiencing financial issues due to the COVID-19 pandemic are eligible to receive assistance through two major programs of the U.S. Small Business Administration, the Payroll Protection Program and the Economic Injury Disaster Loan program.

Payroll Protection Program

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act created the Payroll Protection Program (PPP), providing $349 billion for small business loans for qualified payroll costs, rent, utilities, and interest on mortgages and other debt obligations. PPP loan amounts are forgivable as long as:

  • Loan proceeds are used to cover payroll costs and most mortgage interest, rent, and utility costs over the 8-week period after the loan is made; and
  • Employee and compensation levels are maintained.

The National Council of Farmer Cooperatives (NCFC) and National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA CLUSA) have shared that cooperative businesses in agriculture, purchasing, consumer food, and worker cooperatives that meet the size criteria, generally with fewer than 500 employees, are eligible for this program based on the interim rule and Department guidance.

Applicants can apply to the PPP through eligible Small Business Administration lenders beginning Friday, April 3, 2020. Applicants will be required to submit an application and payroll documentation. To find an eligible SBA lending institution, tap or click here.

For a factsheet about the PPP, including information about loan terms, interest rates, and repayment periods, tap or click here.

Economic Injury Disaster Loans

The Small Business Administration’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program provides small businesses with working capital loans of up to $2 million that can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing due to COVID-19.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, small businesses in all 50 states and Washington, D.C. are eligible to apply for an EIDL advance of up to $10,000 for businesses that are currently experiencing a temporary loss of revenue. This loan advance does not have to be repaid and will be made available within three days of a successful application, even if the loan is not approved or if it is approved and not taken.

Cooperative businesses with fewer than 500 employees are eligible for the EIDL program.

To learn more about the EIDL program, including information about interest rates, loan terms, use of loan funds, and the application process tap or click here. Applicants to the EIDL program can apply directly to the SBA.

To learn more about applying to the EIDL program as a cooperative business, watch this webinar, “Demystifying SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans,” hosted by the National Cooperative Business Association (NCBA CLUSA).

Cooperate with the CFAES Center for Cooperatives

  • Visit us online at go.osu.edu/cooperatives
  • Follow us on Twitter @OSUCooperatives
  • Like us on Facebook @OhioStateCooperatives

Learn more about the Mid America Cooperative Council

Appalachia Cooperates Grows Co-op Culture

Q: How can Extension professionals, business and community developers build a brighter future, robust local economies, and living wage job opportunities in Appalachia?​

A: Worker-ownership.​

Worker-owned cooperatives, defined by two advocates of the model as, “values-driven businesses that put worker and community benefit at the core of their purpose . . . [in which] workers participate in the profits, oversight, and, to varying degrees, the management of the organization, using democratic practices,” (Hoover & Abell 2016).​

The Center for Cooperatives and partners are growing co-op culture in Appalachia! Join us on March 22, 2019 at West Virginia State University Economic Development Center in Charleston.

Check back soon for registration details!

References

Hoover, M. & Abell, H. (2016). The Cooperative Growth Ecosystem: Inclusive Economic Development in Action. Project Equity and the Democracy at Work Institute.

CFAES Center for Cooperatives Launches Co-op Mastery

The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Center for Cooperatives launched Co-op Mastery: Beyond Cooperatives 101, a new and innovative online training course designed to educate cooperative members, boards, management, employees, and students.

Co-op Mastery: Beyond Cooperatives 101 is made possible by a grant from the CHS Foundation 2017 Cooperative Education Grants Program. The training is housed in The Ohio State University’s public-facing online education platform. It is free and can be accessed online at go.osu.edu/coopmastery.

Caption: Co-op Mastery is a new online learning tool launched by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Center for Cooperatives.

“Co-op Mastery curriculum focuses on mid-level knowledge about the cooperative business model,” said Center for Cooperatives Program Manager, Hannah Scott.  “Training modules build on existing fundamental materials by providing an in-depth look at governance, finance, taxation and other areas not typically covered by courses in fundamentals, yet challenging topics for stakeholders.”

The training features eight modules which include video interviews with numerous leaders in the cooperative movement:

  • Logan County Electric Cooperative General Manager Rick Petty discusses cooperative principles and various functions of cooperatives.
  • Dennis Bolling retired President and CEO of United Producers Cooperative shares the benefits cooperatives provide members.
  • Mid-America Cooperative Counsel Executive Director Rod Kelsay discusses effective education and training the Board of Directors.
  • Ohio State Univerisity Extension Educator Dr. Chris Bruynis gives insight to key factors that contribute to a cooperative’s success.
  • Nationwide’s VP of Sponsor Relations Devin Fuhrman shares the story of Nationwide’s history as a mutual cooperative company.
  • Agricultural attorney Carolyn Eselgroth of Barrett, Easterday, Cunningham and Eselgroth, LLP addresses legal considerations when forming a cooperative business.
  • Co-Bank Senior Relationship Manager Gary Weidenborner leads users through an interactive financial document exercise.
  • David Hahn, Professor Emeritus the Ohio State University, explains cooperative taxation.

“We invite folks to ask questions and receive answers from our Center staff in the online Co-op Forum,” said Joy Bauman, Program Coordinator.  “They can also browse an extensive collection of online resources in the Cooperative Library.”

The CFAES Center for Cooperatives offers customized in-person workshops to complement the online training. Workshops are designed to serve the requesting cooperative’s needs. Examples include: new employee education, board of director education, strategic plan development, cooperative marketing and policy development. Workshop participants receive a companion workbook with activities to fortify learning. They gain on-going access to Co-op Mastery online training materials, which they may work through at their own pace or search for specific information to meet immediate needs. Users can return to the Co-op Mastery online materials at any time to troubleshoot cooperative issues and they can receive ongoing technical assistance from CFAES Center for Cooperatives staff. To request a workshop or more information, visit go.osu.edu/cooperatives or contact the Center for Cooperatives at osucooperatives@osu.edu or 740-289-2071 ext. 111.

 

Changes to Tax Law: Section 199A Deductions

The cooperative world has seen a lot of discussion this month about the potential consequences of the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 for agricultural cooperatives and their members. Explore these resources from Iowa State University’s Dr. Keri Jacobs and Dr. Brian Briggeman of Kansas State University with Dr. Philip Kenkel of Oklahoma State University to learn more.

“A Discussion of the Sec 199A Deduction and its Potential Impacts on Producers and Grain Marketing Firms” by Dr. Keri Jacobs in farmdoc daily.

“Impact of Tax Reform on Agricultural Cooperatives: Special Edition ACCC Fact Sheet Series Collaborative Research KSU/OSU” by Dr. Brian Briggeman and Dr. Philip Kenkel.