Take Ag Action in Moorefield, West Virginia on 8/27 and Kearneyville, WV on 8/28

Think a co-op may be part of the solution for your farm or food business?

Now is the time to get involved and/or come to ask questions.

Date: Monday 8/27/2018

Time: 6:30 p.m.

Location: Eastern WV Community & Technical College, 316 Eastern Drive, Moorefield, West Virginia 26836

Date: Tuesday 8/28/2018

Time: 6:30 p.m.

Location: WVU Kearneysville Tree Fruit Research and Education Center, 67 Apple Harvest Drive, Kearneyville, WV.

For more information and to register contact:  tina.metzer@easternwv.edu or nbergdoll@wvda.us

Farming 101: How to Price Farm Products

Determining a price for farm products that attracts consumers and creates profits for producers can be a challenge. A three-part Farming 101 series of articles in Farm & Dairy Newspaper helps farmers calculate costs, conduct price research and implement a price strategy to increase farm sales and revenue.

Click article to visit Farming 101 Archives.
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Celebrate Cooperatives and Sustainability Today

Today, cooperators everywhere celebrate the International Day of Cooperatives. The United Nations established the holiday to recognize co-ops’ contributions to society, culture and the economy. This year’s theme is “Sustainable Consumption and Production.” ¹ The World Commission on Environment and Development defines sustainable development as “meeting the needs of the present generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” ²

Cooperatives provide sustainable solutions

Cooperatives are businesses owned by the people they benefit. They exist in every major industry and are common in food and agriculture. Co-ops provide members with sustainable solutions. They help farmers gain access to larger markets, boost product quality, reduce costs and achieve greater efficiency and operational effectiveness.

Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) is owned by 14,500 farmer-members. The co-op’s sustainability program aims to improve animal and environmental health. DFA’s Gold Standard Dairy Program upholds standards set forth by the National Milk Producers Federation’s National Dairy Farmers Assuring Responsible Management Program (FARM), for animal health, nutrition, management, housing and facilities, handling and transporting. DFA offers on-farm consultations to members to identify areas where sustainable practices can benefit their operations. Members that participate in the Gold Standard Program receive tailored resources and on-going technical assistance to improve sustainability on the farm. ³

Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives (OEC) power rural communities in 77 counties. In recent years OEC has diversified their energy sources portfolio to include renewable sources such as air, wind, hydro, biomass, solar and heat recovery. The co-op promotes energy efficiency through advising, energy audits and appliance rebate incentives that reduce members’ energy expenditures and save members money. ⁴

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company is the No. 1 writer of insurance policies for farms and ranches. Nationwide works towards greater sustainability by reducing environmental waste and carbon emissions and promoting recycling. Nationwide’s green purchasing initiative works with suppliers to purchase eco-friendlier products. The company partners with voluntary government and industry programs such as Energy Star and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). ⁵

On the International Day of Cooperatives farmers everywhere tip our hats to recognize these and other cooperative businesses’ dedication to sustainable consumption and production.

*Article originally published in Farm & Dairy Newspaper

References

  1. United Nations Development. (March 3, 2018). 2018 International Day of Cooperatives. Retrieved from https://www.un.org/development/desa/cooperatives/2018/03/02/coopsday/
  2. United Nations General Assembly. (1987). Report of the world commission on environment and development: Our common future. Oslo, Norway: United Nations General Assembly, Development and International Co-operation: Environment.
  3. Dairy Farmers of America. (n.d.). Sustainability. Retrieved from http://www.dfamilk.com/our-cooperative/sustainability
  4. Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives. (n.d.) Efficiency. Retrieved from https://ohioec.org/oec/efficiency/
  5. Nationwide Insurance. (n.d.) Energy & Environment. Retrieved from https://www.nationwide.com/about-us/energy-environment.jspSTAY INFORMED

CFAES Center for Cooperatives Launches Co-op Mastery

The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Center for Cooperatives launched Co-op Mastery: Beyond Cooperatives 101, a new and innovative online training course designed to educate cooperative members, boards, management, employees, and students.

Co-op Mastery: Beyond Cooperatives 101 is made possible by a grant from the CHS Foundation 2017 Cooperative Education Grants Program. The training is housed in The Ohio State University’s public-facing online education platform. It is free and can be accessed online at go.osu.edu/coopmastery.

Caption: Co-op Mastery is a new online learning tool launched by The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Center for Cooperatives.

“Co-op Mastery curriculum focuses on mid-level knowledge about the cooperative business model,” said Center for Cooperatives Program Manager, Hannah Scott.  “Training modules build on existing fundamental materials by providing an in-depth look at governance, finance, taxation and other areas not typically covered by courses in fundamentals, yet challenging topics for stakeholders.”

The training features eight modules which include video interviews with numerous leaders in the cooperative movement:

  • Logan County Electric Cooperative General Manager Rick Petty discusses cooperative principles and various functions of cooperatives.
  • Dennis Bolling retired President and CEO of United Producers Cooperative shares the benefits cooperatives provide members.
  • Mid-America Cooperative Counsel Executive Director Rod Kelsay discusses effective education and training the Board of Directors.
  • Ohio State Univerisity Extension Educator Dr. Chris Bruynis gives insight to key factors that contribute to a cooperative’s success.
  • Nationwide’s VP of Sponsor Relations Devin Fuhrman shares the story of Nationwide’s history as a mutual cooperative company.
  • Agricultural attorney Carolyn Eselgroth of Barrett, Easterday, Cunningham and Eselgroth, LLP addresses legal considerations when forming a cooperative business.
  • Co-Bank Senior Relationship Manager Gary Weidenborner leads users through an interactive financial document exercise.
  • David Hahn, Professor Emeritus the Ohio State University, explains cooperative taxation.

“We invite folks to ask questions and receive answers from our Center staff in the online Co-op Forum,” said Joy Bauman, Program Coordinator.  “They can also browse an extensive collection of online resources in the Cooperative Library.”

The CFAES Center for Cooperatives offers customized in-person workshops to complement the online training. Workshops are designed to serve the requesting cooperative’s needs. Examples include: new employee education, board of director education, strategic plan development, cooperative marketing and policy development. Workshop participants receive a companion workbook with activities to fortify learning. They gain on-going access to Co-op Mastery online training materials, which they may work through at their own pace or search for specific information to meet immediate needs. Users can return to the Co-op Mastery online materials at any time to troubleshoot cooperative issues and they can receive ongoing technical assistance from CFAES Center for Cooperatives staff. To request a workshop or more information, visit go.osu.edu/cooperatives or contact the Center for Cooperatives at osucooperatives@osu.edu or 740-289-2071 ext. 111.

 

Ohio Agritourism Benefits Farmers and Consumers

The morning began with a hearty cowboy breakfast, then we saddled the horses and hit the trails. We buckaroos rode over rolling hills and crossed trickling creeks. When the afternoon sun grew hot, we rested the horses under a shady canopy of trees. That evening we were treated to a chuck-wagon dinner around a campfire, complete with s’mores and cowboy poetry. It was a perfect day made possible by agritourism.

My husband and I are diehard agritourists. Each summer we visit a local u-pick blueberry farm in South Bloomfield, Ohio. I buy plenty of berries to eat fresh and freeze. In fall we attend Hirsch’s Annual Apple Harvest Open House. We ride the hay wagon to the peak of the property and gaze down at the apple orchard below. The beautiful view still takes my breath away — even after six seasons attending Hirsch Fruit Farm’s agritourism event!

“Inviting the public onto your farm to participate in farm-related activities and see for themselves how food is produced in Ohio can be a win-win for both farmers and consumers,” Christie Welch, Direct Marketing Program Specialist at the Ohio State University South Centers said. “It is a great way to educate the public, and it can add additional income to your operation.”

More benefits

Agritourism also is a business diversification strategy. A pumpkin grower can add a pick-your-own pumpkin patch. Hops and wine grape growers can host locally produced beer and wine tastings at their yard or vineyard. Producers can complement their current offerings with an agritourism activity; a grower of specialty crops can partner with a local chef to cook up a farm-to-table dinner.

Ohio AgritourismReady Conference

Producers considering adding agritourism to their operation will find the possibilities are endless, but there are several things to consider before opening your barn door to the public. Whether you have been inviting the public onto your farm for years or are just exploring the possibilities, the Ohio AgritourismReady Conference aims to prepare producers with the knowledge to start or expand an agritourism operation.  Topics for the conference include:

  • Food & Animals – Managing Liability
  • Awesome Customer Service
  • Getting Grants and Low-Interest Loans
  • Spirits, Beer, and Wine, Oh My!
  • Much more

The conference is being presented by the Ohio State University Extension Direct Food and Agriculture Marketing Team, The Resource and Ag Law Program, Wright & Moore, LPA, and The Ohio Farm Bureau and Pike County Farm Bureau.

The second annual Ohio AgritourismReady Conference we be held March 10, 2018 at the OSU South Centers Endeavor Center in Piketon, Ohio. Registration is required as space is limited.  For more information or to register contact gardner.1148@osu.edu or 740-289-2071 x. 132.  Deadline to register is March 2.  The registration fee is $25/person.  Farm Bureau members can receive a $5 discount.

*Originally published by Farm & Dairy at https://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/ohio-agritourism-benefits-farmers-and-consumers/474157.html

March 1 Seminar – Agricultural Data Coalition: Putting Farmers in the Driver’s Seat

CFAES Center for Cooperatives Seminar Series Agricultural Data Coalition: Putting Farmers in the Driver’s Seat

The CFAES Center for Cooperatives will host a lecture at 3 p.m. on Thursday, March 1 presented by Scott A. Shearer, PhD, Professor and Chair, Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, The Ohio State University.

Dr. Scott A. Shearer will present a lecture on using precision agriculture data, issues of ownership and control, and the potential applications of using this data to help decrease agriculture’s environmental impact.

Dr. Shearer received formal training in agricultural engineering from The Ohio State University.  During his nearly 30-year career in academia, his research efforts have focused on controls and methodologies for metering and spatial distribution of inputs (seed, fertilizer, and chemicals) for precision cropping systems. His current research activities include: modeling of current and future field machinery systems; autonomous, multi-vehicle field production systems; UAS for remote sensing; yield monitoring strategies; precision seeding technologies and management of production agriculture data.

THURSDAY

MARCH 1, 2018

3 P.M.

The Ohio State University

Kottman Hall, Room 102

2021 Coffey Road ٠ Columbus, OH 43210

FREE!

To view seminar online: go.osu.edu/AgDataSem

For more information, contact:

Joy Bauman, Program Coordinator

CFAES Center for Cooperatives

740-289-2071 ext. 111

bauman.67@osu.edu

cooperatives.cfaes.ohio-state.edu

CFAES Center for Cooperatives: Collaboration Creates Greater Impact

Among draft horses, Belgians are reputed to be the strongest and most capable. A single Belgian draft horse can tow 8,000 pounds. More impressive is what two can do together; a team of two draft horses doesn’t just double- but triples pulling power to 24,000 lbs!

Like a team of draft horses, The CFAES Center for Cooperatives combined forces with industry, government and association partners to achieve great things in 2017. Collaboration created greater impact through cooperative education, technical and development assistance for stakeholders and students of cooperatives.

The Center teamed up with the Mid-Ohio Foodbank to share best practices with the Ohio and West Virginia Food Hub Network. Director of Food Resource Development, Mike Frank, led network participants on a tour, describing how the Foodbank has overcome challenges associated with the aggregation, storage and distribution of fresh food. The Network left with practical actions to improve their food hubs’ operational efficiency.

Collaboration between the Center for Cooperatives and the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development provided valuable information to local ag producers looking to diversify or enhance their operations.   A Value-Added Producer Grant informational session with key speakers from the USDA was hosted at the OSU South Centers, offering local producers an opportunity to ask questions and get answers from USDA grant experts.

The Center for Cooperatives worked closely with the Central Appalachia Cooperative Development Group to start Unity Coffee and Teahouse, the first worker-owned cooperative business in Parkersburg, West Virginia. Five Baristas and a coffee roaster created the co-op with a shared vision to foster a commUnity that supports workers, customers and local residents. Unity Coffee and Teahouse opened for business in January 2018.

The Mid-America Cooperative Council (MACC) brought together cooperative developers from across the Midwest to facilitate communication and coordination of co-op educational resources. The Center met with counterparts from Kentucky, Indiana and northeast Ohio at United Producers, Inc. headquarters in Columbus for a two-day roundtable. Developers discussed programming, goals and alignment. The Center identified opportunities to boost educational programming and technical assistance in the region by sharing knowledge and pooling resources.

The Center facilitated cooperative education for visiting scholars in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics over their stay in the United States, including an educational tour of agricultural cooperatives at the Farm Science Review. Scholars visited with representatives from Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, Farm Credit, Heritage Cooperative, Dairy Farmers of America and COBA/Select Sires. The scholars returned to Ukraine motivated to share their newfound knowledge of agricultural cooperatives with students at their respective universities.

The Center connected with local vocational schools and FFA to build students’ awareness of careers in agricultural cooperatives. The Center hosted students at OSU South Centers, visited Ohio Valley Career & Technical Center FFA and served on an Ag Career panel in Ross County.

The Center worked with the Ohio State University CFAES Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics instructors to facilitate an undergraduate class project. Students interviewed cooperative leaders and created multimedia presentations sharing what they learned about the cooperative model.

Collaboration with partners created a great impact in 2017. The CFAES Center for Cooperatives intends to increase our horse power in 2018. We look forward to partnering with the Ohio Farm Bureau to provide cooperative education to the next generation of leaders at the AgriPOWER Institute and the Young Agricultural Professionals Winter Leadership Experience. The Center will forge new relationships with growers, producers and marketers at the annual Ohio Produce Network conference, the Ohio Association of Meat Processors conference, and the 14th Annual West Virginia Small Farm Conference. Together, the Center and partners are resolved to drive forward the cooperative movement in the region and beyond.

*View The Ohio State University South Center’s Connections Newsletter: Winter 2018 Achievements Edition at:

https://southcenters.osu.edu/newsletter/connections-newsletter

Cultivating community and local food production in West Virginia: The 2018 Small Farm Conference

“Agriculture can and will be part of the solution to stabilize and grow our economy with the right plan,” stated Kent Leonhardt, West Virginia Commissioner of Agriculture. West Virginians consume over $7 billion dollars of food each year, but produce only $800 million dollars of food. The commissioner believes growing and producing more food in the Mountain State will strengthen West Virginia’s food system, boost farmers’ profitability, and create new jobs in agriculture that will benefit individuals and local economies. ¹

Barriers to small farm profitability

The average farm in West Virginia is 175 acres. Farmers face several barriers to operate a successful small farm enterprise. Achieving profitability with limited production yield on less land is a major challenge. Farmers have fewer options to diversify small operations. They experience difficulty finding the right market mix and scaling production to serve larger markets. Additionally, lack of infrastructure and distribution are common barriers.

The West Virginia Small Farm Conference offers solutions

The 14th Annual West Virginia Small Farm Conference offers solutions to unlock the potential of West Virginia small farms to produce food profitably. The conference will take place February 21-24, 2018 at the Morgantown Event Center in Morgantown, West Virginia. The goal of the conference is to help farmers develop a successful small farming enterprise by providing reliable, tested knowledge about current trends, needed skills, and latest production and operation information. The conference also aims to strengthen West Virginia’s food system by encouraging local production, processing, wholesale and retail marketing, and consumption.

There will be a wide variety of educational workshops during the three-day event. Farmers will learn about livestock, fruit, vegetable and specialty crop production. In-depth discussions led by experts in farm management, marketing, finance and risk, will benefit farm enterprises of all types. Food producers will learn how to add value to their farm products, utilize agricultural cooperatives to gain market access. Special sessions will highlight West Virginia’s Farm-to-School initiative, Farmers’ Markets and agritourism opportunities in the Mountain State.

Know your farmer, know your food

The Winter Blues Farmers Market will take place on Thursday, February 22, 2018, from 4-8 p.m. at the Morgantown Event Center. The community event is family-friendly and open to the public. The market will showcase local food, goods and products. Enjoy the aroma of delicious food cooking while browsing the market. Area chefs will be on-hand to prepare pay-as-you-go dishes and entrees with locally grown food.

What: The 14th Annual West Virginia Small Farm Conference

When: February 21-24, 2018

Where: Morgantown Event Center in Morgantown, West Virginia

Cost: Registration is $70 per day, or $190/3 days for adults. Students, active military and veterans receive a discounted rate. Registration includes breakfast, lunch, snacks, Friday dinner, and conference materials. A $10 convenience fee increase per person per day for walk-in registrations.

Link to register and learn more: https://extension.wvu.edu/conferences/small-farm-conference

Reference

  1. 2017 Annual West Virginia Agricultural Statistics Bulletin. No. 48. USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service, West Virginia Field Office. 2017. www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/West_Virginia/Publications/Annual_Statistical_Bulletin/2017/Bulletin2017-All.pdf. Date Accessed 5 Feb 2018.

 

YAP Conference to Educate, Empower and Encourage the Next Generation

The future of farming is just over the horizon. Are young farmers prepared to fill their predecessors’ boots? Do they have what it takes to conquer challenges facing the agricultural industry? Are they confident to lead themselves and others?

The Ohio Farm Bureau Federation’s annual Young Agricultural Professionals Winter Leadership Experience will take place February 3-4, 2018, in Columbus, Ohio. 650 Young farmers from across Ohio are registered to attend the 2-day event.

“The YAP Winter Leadership Conference is where young farmers and Ag professionals can professionally and personally grow by attending a variety of educational breakout sessions,” said Melinda Witten, Ohio Farm Bureau Director of Leadership Programming. “It is a place to connect and build a community with folks who have shared experiences.”

The upcoming conference offers a wide variety of programming to educate, empower and encourage the next generation of Ohio farmers.

Educate

The Winter Leadership Experience prepares future farmers with knowledge and skills to build a farm business or successful career in Ag. Industry experts and educators will offer workshops in business and financial planning, strategies to manage risk and comply with regulations.

Marketing workshops will teach young farmers how to effectively position and sell their farm products. Attendees will learn how to find and communicate with consumers. Video and social media workshops will instruct young farmers how to harness the power of digital marketing to grow their agribusinesses.

Empower

The YAP Winter Leadership Experience empowers young farmers with confidence to lead. A compelling Discussion Meet Competition will showcase young agriculturalists in a dialog over issues impacting the agriculture industry. The winner of the Discussion Meet will receive a $1,000 cash award from Nationwide Insurance.

A panel of Ohio Farm Bureau Federation leadership featuring Farm Bureau’s OFB President Frank Burkett and Vice President Adam Sharp and will share their vision for the Farm Bureau’s future in an interactive session with young farmers. Additional workshops in conflict and human resource management will offer tools for young farmers can use to effectively lead themselves and others.

Encourage

Networking at the Winter Leadership Conference creates meaningful connections. Young farmers will enjoy fellowship other farmers, explore potential partnerships, and meet mentors and business advisors.

On Saturday, The Ohio State University CFAES Center for Cooperatives will present a panel of grant experts from university, government and private organizations. The Agricultural Grant Opportunities Workshop will encourage attendees to utilize federal, state and private grant programs to develop value-added products, accomplish on-farm research and make conservation improvements.

Don’t forget the funYAP 2017

The Winter Leadership Conference has something for everyone. Fun workshops will teach attendees how to preserve food, make soap and prep for healthy meals. The conference kicks-off with Friday night food, games and entertainment featuring Big Bang Dueling Pianos.

Details about the upcoming conference are on the Ohio Farm Bureau website, https://ofbf.org/yap-winter-leadership-experience

Article originally published in Farm & Dairy Newspaper

https://www.farmanddairy.com/top-stories/yap-conference-to-educate-empower-and-encourage-the-next-generation/467557.html