Lady Landowners Leaving the Legacy

Author: Amanda Douridas, Champaign County Extension Educator

Land is an important investment. One that is often passed down through generations. Farmland needs to be monitored and cared for to maintain the value and sustainability if it is to be enjoyed and profitable for future generations. Nearly 50% of landowners in Ohio are female. If you fall into this statistic and want to learn more about your land, farming and conservation practices and how to successfully pass it on to the next generation, this program is for you!

Farming has changed dramatically over the last several decades. The thought of trying to understand it all can be overwhelming, especially if not actively farming. This series is designed to help female landowners understand critical conservation and farm management issues related to owning land. It will provide participants with the knowledge, skills and confidence to talk with tenants about farming and conservation practices used on their land. The farm management portion will provide an understanding of passing land on to the next generation and help establish fair rental rates by looking at current farm budgets.

The series runs every other Thursday, June 14 through August 23 from 9:00-11:30 in the Champaign County Community Center Auditorium in Urbana, Ohio. It is $50 for the series. If you are only able to attend a couple of session, it is $10 per session but there is a lot of value in getting to know other participants in the series and talking with them each week. The registration flyer can be found at http://go.osu.edu/agevents. For questions or more information, please contact Amanda Douridas at 937-484-1526 or Douridas.9@osu.edu. Please register by June 4. The detailed agenda is below.

June 14- Building Soil Structure

  • Introductions
  • Soil Structure Discussion and Demo
  • Tillage Methods and Compaction (includes three demonstrations)
  • Soil Coverage Discussion and Demo

June 28- Implementing Conservation

  • Conservation Activity
  • Aquifer Demonstration
  • Watershed Maps of Participants Farms
  • Explanation of Conservation Practices

July 12- Value of the Land Beyond the Dollar

  • Land Value Diagram
  • Landowner/Tenant Relationship Panel
  • Wildlife Habitat Programs

July 26- Transition and Succession Planning

  • Peggy Hall and Wright Moore Law Firm

Aug 9- Leasing and Budgets

  • Good Leasing Contracts
  • Hunting Leases
  • Overview of Commodity Budgets

Aug 23- Farm Visit

Some activities developed by Women, Food and Agriculture Network for its Women Caring for the Land program.

Weekend Annie’s Project at Salt Fork State Park

Six amazing women are now graduates of Annie’s Project after this weekend’s retreat at Salt Fork State Park lodge. The weekend’s topics covered farm business mission statements and goals, collaborating with lenders, liability insurance, grain marketing, succession planning, transferring non-titled property (the sentimental family heirlooms), legal liability, and more. Be on the look-out for an Annie’s Project near you, or call your local Extension Office to express you interest in bringing a program to your county!

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Annie’s Project East Retreat Agenda

Registration will remain open for the Annie’s Project East Retreat until next Wednesday, January 24. Please register online: Annie’s Project East Retreat Registration  This retreat will be from Friday, January 26 at 4:00 pm until Sunday, January 28 at 11:00 am at the Salt Fork State Park Lodge and Conference Center.

 

East Ohio Women in Agriculture Fall Dinner Program

Image result for clear the clutterJoin us for an evening of networking, idea sharing and delicious food. Identify your top time wasters and problem areas. Gain perspective and tools for prioritizing. Share tips, tools and routines that work for you!

All Dates – Fall Dinner – Program flyer-1l16kp3

You can register online for the  November 14 Dinner that will be in eastern Coshocton  County at go.osu.edu/wiadinner2017

 

Is Your Summer Event Welcoming and Accessible to People with Disabilities?

Laura Akgerman Disability Services Coordinator for Ohio AgrAbility

Summer is the season for outdoor events – street fairs, farmers markets, county fairs, and Agritourism. If your event or business is open to the public, it must be accessible to people with disabilities.

The American’s with Disabilities Act is a federal law that requires businesses and events to be accessible to everyone. Not only will ADA guidelines benefit the 14% of Ohioan’s who have a disability, they also make your event open and welcoming to everyone.

Having accessible entrances is the first step to providing access to your facilities and programs. Facilities which have wide entrances with ramps or no steps, easy to open doors, and large restroom stalls are easier for people with baby strollers or carts, as well as people who use canes or walkers.

However, providing access is more than getting people through the gate, it also includes, advertising, parking, restrooms and more. Here is a list of topics to consider when making your event accessible to people with disabilities.

Promotional materials and websites

All websites and advertisements should be accessible. Include information for whom to contact about requests for accommodations to the event, such as sign language interpreters, accessible seating, or accessible programs or maps. If the event is accessible, including an accessibility symbol on advertising indicates your event welcomes everyone.

Parking

When parking is provided for the public, accessible parking spaces must be allotted for those with disabilities. For every 25 spaces, at least one space must be designated as accessible. The accessible parking space should be the space closest to the accessible entrance.  If you have van accessible spaces, there should be additional space located either to the right or left of the space, to serve as an access aisle. This additional space allows a person in a wheelchair or other mobility device to get out of the vehicle freely. Accessible parking spaces should be on level ground, and should be free of debris or obstructions.

Walking paths and surfaces

Walking paths should be designed for easy travel. They should be clear of debris, equipment, and other barriers (for example hoses, tools, or piles of dirt). Their surface can be a solid or hard packed material, easy for a person using a wheelchair or walker could safely and easily traverse.

Entrances and ticket booths

Entrances for buildings and facilities must contain at least one accessible entrance. Accessibility can be achieved with a ramp, or an entrance with no thresholds, steps or barriers. Accessible entrances should be at least 36” wide.

Accessible entrances must be unlocked during business hours, and if the door or entrance does not have an automatic opener, it should have a bell or buzzer to notify staff to open the door.

If your event has ticket booths, the counter height of at least one ticket booth should be a maximum of 36” high. If you use turnstiles, there must also be a gate, or accessible entrance to bypass the turnstile.

Signage

Clear, easy to read signs are necessary to direct people to accessible entrances, parking, and restrooms. Signs in or around permanent buildings should have both text and braille lettering.

Restrooms

ADA Standards require that at least 5% of portable toilets be accessible. Permanent bathrooms should have at least one toilet and sink that are accessible.

Counters and dining tables

Counter height should be a maximum of 36” high, with clear floor space under the counter to allow a person in a wheelchair to pull up to the counter.

If tables are provided, 5% of tables should be accessible, with at least 27 “ of space between the floor and the underside of the table.

Access to stage areas and seating

Accessible seating must be available throughout an event space. If someone attending your event needs to go on the stage, the stage must be accessible. Ramps can be rented to make a stage accessible, or a temporary lift can be used to allow access to the stage.

Service animals

According to the ADA, service animals are dogs or miniature horses only. There is no required or official certification for service animals. The animal must be under the handler’s control at all times, and may be asked to leave if the animal is aggressive or out of control. The handler is responsible for cleaning up after the animal.

To determine if an animal is a service animal, and must be admitted to an event or business, there are only two questions you can legally ask:

  1. Is the dog/mini horse required because of a disability?
  2. What work or task has the animal been trained to perform?

(You cannot ask for a demonstration of the animal’s work)

Emotional support or therapy animals are not covered under the ADA guidelines, and do not have to be admitted to events or businesses.  However, emotional support and therapy animals are covered under certain housing laws; if you offer temporary or permanent housing, the animals may be admissible.

More information about the ADA can be found at www.ada.gov. Specific information about how the ADA applies to small businesses can be found under the Technical Assistance Materials link on the ada.gov website. For information about making temporary events accessible, go to https://adata.org/publication/temporary-events-guide

For more information please contact Laura Akgerman, Ohio AgrAbility & OSU Extension Disability Services Coordinator, at Akgerman.4@osu.edu, or 614-292-0622.