Posts

OMK Spotlights – Hailee Sprague

We’re kicking off Month of the Military Child with our OMK Spotlights! Our first spotlight is Hailee Sprague.

Hailee has been a camper at Camp Kelley’s Island for about 8 years and is a 3rd year counselor. Hailee is apart of the Ohio Military Teen Council and helps plan camps/events and do community service. Additionally, Hailee has been going to the Teen Leadership Camp for a few years now and hopes to be a counselor there this year!

When asked about Ohio Military Kids’ impact, Hailee says:

“Throughout my almost 10 years with this program, I have learned about leadership, friendship, and probably every positive thing I could ever need to know. Ohio Military Kids has given me the opportunity to not only gain a positive experience, but now I am able to share my positive experiences with the youth. Being a counselor has been one of the greatest opportunities I have ever had and has even influenced me to help coach soccer and softball. I love working with the kids and making their weeks the best that they have ever had, just like my counselor did for me when I was younger. This may sound a little extreme, but Ohio Military Kids has (in a way) changed and saved my life. I’ve made lifelong friendships and gained skills I would’ve never been able to anywhere else. I love the Ohio Military Kids program and I do not plan on leaving it anytime soon.”

Thank you Hailee for participating in our OMK Spotlight! If you would like to participate, please fill out this form: go.osu.edu/OMKspotlight

Ohio Military Kids Spotlights

April is the Month of the Military Kids, and OMK wants shine a spotlight on our outstanding military kids! If you are involved with Ohio Military Kids, please fill out this survey: go.osu.edu/OMKspotlight

We will be taking submissions throughout April. If you have any questions about the survey or spotlights, please contact Elizabeth Fannin (fannin.125@osu.edu).

 

Free Activity Books for Military Families – Order by 4/1

We are excited to announce that once again, Ohio Military Kids is offering free projects books for you and your family! Continue reading to learn more about how you can get your hands on a free project activity book.

 

Our partners at Ohio 4-H are proud to present a collection of project books to military families – at no cost to you! Ohio Military Kids is an organization that benefits from the youth development education offered from Ohio 4-H and the organization resources contributed from Ohio National Guard Family Readiness and Warrior Support. Together, we hope that your families may benefit from the education opportunities found in the collection of project book titles listed in this survey.

Here are the books we are offering:

 

Ohio Birds – “Observe and identify birds with bird feeders in your yard and on field trips to see the many benefits our feathered friends provide. This project book is intended to be used for two years.”

Geology: Can You Dig It? – “Discover our planet’s past with clues in rocks, minerals, and fossils that you collect. Learn where to find these items, how to identify them, and how they formed. Showcase all your findings in a display of your design.”

Let’s Start Cooking – “This project takes a fresh look at basic cooking and baking skills. You’ll learn about kitchen equipment and food prep, and how to read recipes and measure ingredients. Then you’ll tackle how to slice and dice food, and how to cook in a microwave oven, on the stove and in a conventional oven all while keeping safety in mind. Appropriate for members of all ages with little or no cooking or baking experience.”

Everyday Food and Fitness – “Learn how to prepare healthy and hearty snacks using MyPlate as a guide, and discover how powerful healthy food can be for your body and mind. Fun and easy recipes help build your skills in the kitchen. See how well your current diet fits into the MyPlate food groups. Find out what makes grains great, and why vitamins and nutrients are so beneficial. This project shows you how to add exercise to a healthy diet and find the path to a better quality of life.”

Sports Nutrition – “Eating well and exercising daily are two keys to a healthy life. This project shows why these habits are worth forming. Learn how to balance the calories you eat with the calories you burn, why to hydrate, and how carbs, protein, and fats work to support your body and mind. Use what you learn as you compete in sports or just want to increase your fitness level.”

 

Please note that we have a very limited supply of each book. You may only select one of each book per order. If a book has “sold out” it will not be displayed as an option.

Requests must be placed by April 2 at 11:59 PM. Orders will then be processed and sent to families approximately 3-5 weeks after the order deadline.

For additional information about this program or enrollment in Ohio 4-H, please contact State 4-H Healthy Living and Ohio Military Kids Student Assistant, Matthew Swearingen (swearingen.96s@osu.edu)

go.osu.edu/omk4hbookorder

Daylight Saving Time Facts and History

Unfortunately, next week we will be “losing” an hour of sleep. That’s right, your clocks will spring forward for Daylight Saving Time on March 10th! What does this mean? Well, you can expect longer days with the sun staying out later each night.

 

You might be asking yourself, who do I have to blame for losing an hour of sleep? According to Almanac, the true “founder” of Daylight Saving Time is William Willet. Willet became a proponent of the light-saving campaign when he was riding his horse early in the morning and noticed that the shutters on houses were sealed up, despite the Sun being out. 

 

Willet would go on to lobby the English Parliament, businesses, and the U.S. Congress in support of saving daylight.  Willet wrote, “Everyone appreciates the long, light evenings. Everyone laments their shrinkage as the days grow shorter, and nearly everyone has given utterance to a regret that the nearly clear, bright light of an early morning during Spring and Summer months is so seldom seen or used… . That so many as 210 hours of daylight are, to all intents and purposes, wasted every year is a defect in our civilization. Let England recognize and remedy it.”

 

Willet suggested that society should move their clocks 20 minutes forward each of the four Sundays in April and reverse the process in September. Although spending a small fortune to promote this method, Willet was mostly met with ridicule.

 

Most popular, though, might be Benjamin Franklin’s “An Economical Project,” written in 1784, in which he advocated for citizens to wake at the crack of dawn in order to save the expense of candlelight.

 

It wasn’t until World War I that Daylight Saving Time was truly adapted and accepted. Both governments and citizens realized the importance of conserving coal used for heating purposes. In 1915, Germany officially adopted the light-extending system and the next year, Britain introduced their verison, which is known as British Summer Time.  

 

The United States followed in suit in 1918 when Congress passed the Standard Time Act. This established time zones, despite public opposition. A Congressional Committee was formed to research the benefits of Daylight Saving Time. The general public viewed Daylight Saving Time as absurd. Advocates for Daylight Saving Time advertised it as the more natural option and an extension of summer.

 

Ultimately, Congress was able to officially declare that clocks would be moved one hour ahead at 2:00 A.M. on March 31, 1918. To combat its effects, Americans were encouraged to turn their lights off and go to bed at an earlier time than normal.

 

A common misconception about Daylight Saving Time is that farmers are at the root of its creation. Farmers were actually strongly against the time change and opposed it from the beginning. After WWI ended, farmers began to openly speak out against Daylight Saving Time. Opponents most often identified the gap between urban and rural citizens, as the change impacted the two communities in significantly different ways. The pushback resulted in the initial Daylight Saving Time experiment lasting only until 1920, being repealed primarily due to opposition from dairy farmers. 

 

When World War II came around, Daylight Saving Time was once again implemented to save fuel. After this, Daylight Saving Time seemed to stick on a state-by-state basis. Then, in 1966 Congress passed the Uniform Time Act which established a consistent use of Daylight Saving Time. States like Hawaii and Arizona did not change their clocks. Additionally, some residents of Indiana opposed the idea.

 

Daylight Saving Time as we know it today was established with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that went into effect in 2007.Generally, Americans spring forward on the second Sunday in March and fall back on the first Sunday in November. Check out how your sunrise and sunset times will change here: https://www.almanac.com/astronomy/sun-rise-and-set 

 

Today, there are still many opponents of Daylight Saving Time. As of January 2023, 19 states have passed bills that would end the practice of switching clocks. Even the Senate passed a permanent end to Daylight Saving Time, but it was not taken up by the House. To stay up-to-date on the current Daylight Saving Time policies, click here: https://www.almanac.com/states-object-changing-clocks-daylight-saving-time 

For now, we are left to deal with longer summer days at the expense of losing an hour of sleep in March. The time change can come along with some difficulties. So, as we spring forward on March 10th, check out this list of ways to combat the struggles of Daylight Saving Time: https://www.sleepfoundation.org/circadian-rhythm/how-to-prepare-for-daylight-saving-time

Black History Month and the Military

According to the NAACP, in 1976 scholar Carter G. Woodson’s dedication to celebrating the historic contributions of Black people cultivated into and established Black History Month. Since then, we have recognized February as Black History Month or United Black World Month. ASALH explains that we use this time to recognize and honor the greatest moments and accomplishments of African-Americans.

Black History Month should be an educational opportunity for everyone. Throughout February, there are many opportunities to learn about the resilience stories of African-Americans. This week, our blog post is dedicated to learning about significant African-American military servicemen and servicewomen. 

The US Army reports that Black Americans have made sacrifices in every conflict of our nation’s history, having more than 245 years of honorable service. Despite facing great adversity, America has never fought a war without Black Americans. Here are just a few of the honorable African-Americans that have fought for our country, all of which have been identified by USO.

 

Oleta Crain

https://www.denverpost.com/2007/11/21/retired-army-major-fought-lived-through-bias/ 

Three hundred women entered officer training during World War II, but only three of them were Black. Olera Crain was one of those three, and following the war she was the only Black female officer to be retained by the entire U.S. Military.

Crain’s career was marked by honorable service while also battling racism and segregation. She completed tours in Alaska, England, and Germany while fighting for civil rights in military training. While she served, Crain brought attention to racial segregation and discrimination in the military. She retired as a respected Army major. However, she continued to fight for civil rights, more specifically for Black women. 

 

Henry Johnson

https://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/johnson/ 

Pvt. Henry Johnson was a part of the 369th Infantry Regiment, known as the “Harlem Hellfighters.” The 369th Infantry regiment was an all-African American unit in World War I known for seeing more combat than all other U.S. outfits and having a world-famous ragtime band.

President Theodore Roosevelt described Johnson as one of the “five bravest Americans” who served in the entire war. Johnson single-handedly fought off more than 20 Germans and saved a fellow soldier from capture, accomplishing both while injured. In 2015, Johnson was awarded with the U.S. Medal of Honor.

 

Lawrence Joel

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lawrence-joel-earns-medal-of-honor

Sgt. 1st Class Lawrence Joel was a member of the 173rd Airborne Brigade during the Vietnam War. Joel is known for the immense courage he showed while against the outnumbered odds during the Vietnam War.

Despite being shot in the thigh and calf when his battalion was ambushed by Viet Cong, Joel was determined to fulfill his duties as medic by attending to the wounded on the battlefield while they were under direct fire. After running out of supplies, Joel persevered throughout the 24-hour battle by using improvised materials in order to save lives. 

Joel was presented with the SIlver Star and the Medal of Honor. He was the first medic to receive the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War. Additionally, he was the first living African-American to receive it since the Spanish-American War.

 

Melvin Morris

https://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/morris/?f=recipient_list 

Staff Sgt. Melvin Morris went above and beyond the call of duty during the Vietnam War. While leading an advance across military lines to recover the body of a fallen soldier, Morris was shot three times but still managed to destroy four enemy bunkers.

In 1961, Morris became one of the first green berets and was awarded the medal of honor in 2014.

 

Mary Ehiarinmwian

https://www.uso.org/stories/2923-meet-the-2020-uso-service-members-of-the-year 

In 2019, U.S. Army Sgt. Mary Ehiarinmwian was on her way to PT at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii when the car in front of her lost control and ended upside down on a steel property gate. Ehiarinmwian assessed the situation, and managed to remove the driver from the vehicle to safety. 

For her bravery, Ehiarinmwian was recognized as the USO Soldier of the Year in 2020. Ehiarinmwian explained that there is no “off-duty” for service members, and she proved so by putting herself in the way of danger to save another life. 

 

For more information on Black History Month, visit: https://asalh.org/about-us/about-black-history-month/

 

To learn of more moments of bravery in African American military history, visit: https://www.uso.org/stories/2308-bravery-in-african-american-military-history 

Webinar Opportunity for Military Families – “Supporting Military Families in the Artificial Intelligence Era”

OneOp is an organization dedicated to providing professional development for military family service providers. This month, OneOp is offering a webinar titled “Supporting Military Families in the Artificial Intelligence Era”

 

Date: February 20

Time: 11:00am-12:30pm

Registration: https://oneop.org/learn/160020/

 

Webinar description: “Artificial Intelligence (AI) can provide valuable assistance to family service providers in various ways, enhancing their ability to offer support and improve outcomes for their clients. Explore AI as a tool for family service providers to increase efficiencies, creativity and engagement in their work with military families. While AI can offer opportunities for family service providers, it should be deployed thoughtfully in order to enhance the relational aspects of service delivery and with workplace policies in mind. In an evolving artificial intelligence landscape, it is essential for family service providers to consider the social impacts for military families including employment and workforce changes, fraud/scams, privacy concerns, and AI bias/discrimination.”

 

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the various ways that service providers may already be experiencing artificial intelligence 
  • Identify professional uses of artificial intelligence for service providers and adult educators
  • Explore the social impacts of AI for families and service providers

 

Presenters:

Dr. Barbara O’Neill

Dr. Barbara O’Neill, CFP®, AFC writes, speaks, and reviews content about personal finance. A Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Rutgers University, after 41 years of service as a Rutgers Cooperative Extension educator and personal finance specialist, she has written over 190 articles for academic publications and received over 35 national awards and over $1.2 million in grants to support her financial education programs and research. Dr. O’Neill is a past President of the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (AFCPE), a recipient of the AFCPE Distinguished Fellow Award, and a Next Gen Personal Finance fellow.

 

Bob Bertsch

Bob Bertsch has worked for more than 20 years in communications, education, and web technology, and has found a passion for building human networks, especially those focused on collective action. He seeks and shares insights on weaving collaborative networks and on developing a culture of innovation through his work with the North Dakota State University Extension and OneOp.

 

For more information about this webinar, visit: https://oneop.org/learn/160020/ 

Valentine’s Day Craft for Families

Are you looking for ways to spread love this Valentine’s Day? Well the big day is less than a week away! Here is a craft for you and your family to have some fun this year.

Supplies:

Paint (Red and Green)

Paintbrush

Paper

Scissors

Markers/Pens

Clear Dry Glue

 

Instructions:

Step 1: Use the paintbrush to paint on the red paint onto your kiddos’ hands.

Step 2: Press a few handprints onto the paper

Step 3: Wait to dry, and cut out the individual handprints and place in a bouquet style on another piece of paper.

Step 4: Use the green paint to draw and connect stems to the “hand flowers.”

 

For more family-oriented crafts, visit: https://dailydoseofdiy.com/26-fabulous-valentines-day-crafts-for-kids/

Adapted from: https://www.nannyshecando.com/valentines-day-easy-kids-craft/

Reminder for Military Kids Scholarships

Earlier last year, we shared a blog post about scholarships available exclusively to military kids. When the ball dropped on New Years, so did the applications for a lot of those scholarships! So, as a reminder, here are some scholarships that are now active and accepting applications. We encourage you to apply!

 

American Legion Legacy Scholarship

“The American Legion’s Legacy Scholarship provides college funding to children of post-9/11 veterans who died on active duty, or those who have a combined VA disability rating of 50 percent or greater.”

Application Timeline: January 1-April 1 2024

Link: https://www.legion.org/scholarships/legacy

 

AMVETS Children/Grandchildren Scholarships

“This application is specific to graduating high school seniors (child or grandchild) of an Honorably Served Veterans, Active Duty and Guard/Reserves.”

Application Timeline: January 15 – April 30 2024

Link: https://www.amvets.org/scholarships 

 

Fischer House Scholarships for Military Children

“The Scholarships for Military Children program is open to unmarried military dependent children under the age 23 who possess a valid Uniformed Services Identification (USID) card. In addition, a student’s parent(s)/sponsor(s) must be one of the following: active duty, reserve/guard, deceased, or retired from the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, or Space Force.”

Application Timeline: Opened mid-December 2023

Link:https://fisherhouse.org/programs/scholarship-programs/scholarships-for-military-children/ 

 

Army Scholarship Foundation

“Applicants must: Be sons or daughters of regular active duty, active duty Reserve, or active duty National Guard U.S. Army members in good standing, OR Be spouses of serving enlisted regular active duty, active duty Reserve, or active duty National Guard U.S. Army members in good standing, OR Be sons or daughters of former U.S. Army members who received an honorable discharge or medical discharge, or who were killed while serving in the U.S. Army. Be high school seniors, high school graduates, or registered as undergraduate students at an accredited college or post high school vocational/technical institution.”

Application timeline: January 15-April 15 2024

Link: https://armyscholarshipfoundation.org/scholarships/ 

 

Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation

“The Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation was established to honor the service and sacrifice of Marines and their families. That’s why we are grateful for your tax-deductible donations. As our Nation’s oldest and largest provider of need-based scholarships to military children, the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation helps cover the cost of attending post-high school, undergraduate, and career and technical education programs. Every gift has a significant life-changing impact. With your support, we can make sure that no Marine family is left behind.”

Application timeline: Opens on January 1, 2024

Link: https://www.mcsf.org/ 

 

The Folds of Honor Higher Education Scholarship

“We ensure that families who’ve sacrificed so much for our country and communities receive the education and opportunities they deserve. Whether it’s K-12th grade or higher education, we believe the cost of pursuing their academic dreams should not be an additional burden.”

Application timeline: Opens February 1, 2024

Link: https://foldsofhonor.org/scholarships/ 

 

Navy League of The United States Scholarships

“College should never be out of reach for a family member of the sea services. The Navy League Foundation guarantees this support by awarding scholarships to high school seniors who will attend college in the fall. Navy League Foundation scholarships are available to children and grandchildren of veterans or active duty sea service men and women, as well as members of the U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps.”

Application timeline: Application closes March 2024

Link: https://www.navyleague.org/programs/scholarships/ 

 

Children of Warriors National Presidents’ Scholarship

“It is important to acknowledge the sacrifices of our service members who preserve our freedom, but that is not enough. The sacrifices of the children of those who served should also be honored. Providing funds to assist these children so they can pursue higher education is a concrete way of showing how much we, as a nation, care.

The American Legion Auxiliary sponsors the Children of Warriors National Presidents’ Scholarship to support the children of our warriors. These scholarships are awarded to 15 students annually who excel in academics and volunteer in their communities.”

Application timeline: Closes March 1, 2024

Link: https://www.legion-aux.org/Scholarships/Children-of-Warriors 

 

Wings Over America Scholarships

“Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation annually sponsors 50 scholarships to further the post secondary education of Navy dependents from the aviation community. Most scholarships are $5,000 and some are renewable.

Scholarships may be used for trade school certification, community college or four-year university/college undergraduate study and cover tuition only at an accredited institution.

If an applicant’s tuition is fully covered by other scholarships from their institution, ROTC, or Post 9/11 Bill/Yellow Ribbon benefits, they are ineligible to receive a scholarship. Students attending service academies are also ineligible.”

Application timeline: Opened October 1, 2023

Link: https://wingsoveramerica.us/app

 

Coast Guard Foundation Scholarships:

“Support for education is a cornerstone of our commitment to the men and women of the U.S. Coast Guard and their families. Our scholarships are one of the ways we thank our brave men and women for their steadfast service to our nation, while also ensuring their family members can afford to reach their higher education dreams.”

Application timeline: February 1 – March 15 2024

Link: https://coastguardfoundation.org/scholarships

 

It’s important to note the deadlines on these scholarships, as the vary from application to application. For more scholarship resources, visit: https://www.militaryonesource.mil/benefits/college-scholarships-for-military-teens/

Free Activity Books for Military Families – Order by 2/2

We are excited to announce that once again, Ohio Military Kids is offering free projects books for you and your family! Continue reading to learn more about how you can get your hands on a free project activity book.

Our partners at Ohio 4-H are proud to present a collection of project books to military families – at no cost to you! Ohio Military Kids is an organization that benefits from the youth development education offered from Ohio 4-H and the organization resources contributed from Ohio National Guard Family Readiness and Warrior Support. Together, we hope that your families may benefit from the education opportunities found in the collection of project book titles listed in this survey.

 

Here are the books we are offering:

  • Edible Landscapes – “Beginning-level youth of any age can learn to grow edible plants, including fruit trees. Add edibles to the current landscape, swap existing plants for edible plants, create a new garden, or do all three! The activities guide you as you complete a site evaluation, plan which edible plants to use, plant and nurture them, and then enjoy the fruits and vegetables as they ripen.”
  • Explore the Outdoors – “This project opens your eyes to the great outdoors, so get your backpack and field guides ready. The first activity shows how to prepare for an outdoor adventure so you can explore the woodlands, fields, wetlands, and the geology of Ohio. Once you see nature with a new appreciation, you’ll want to learn more! Intended for youth of all ages interested in Ohio’s wildlife and ecosystems.”
  • Medicine Science and Safety – “Who should help you make decisions about medicine? How can you stay safe around it? These and other important questions are answered with five hands-on activities that get right to the point. Follow the core messages and become a good example for others. Learn about careers in pharmacy too!”
  • Rockets Away! – “These ten lessons, described in detail in the Rockets Away Teacher Guide, are a student’s gateway to the practical knowledge behind Newton’s Laws of Motion. Educational research shows that the practice of recording one’s own data and observations helps students internalize concepts.

 

Please note that we have a very limited supply of each book. You may only select one of each book per order. If a book has “sold out” it will not be displayed as an option.

Requests must be placed by February 2 at 11:59 PM. Orders will then be processed and sent to families approximately 3-5 weeks after the order deadline.

 

For additional information about this program or enrollment in Ohio 4-H, please contact State 4-H Healthy Living and Ohio Military Kids Student Assistant, Matthew Swearingen (swearingen.96s@osu.edu)

 

go.osu.edu/omk4hbookorder

Healthy Hot Chocolate Recipe – Vegan and Dairy Free

Ohio’s cold weather has been pretty brutal this week, but don’t let these chilly temperatures keep you from having a sweet, classic winter treat. Want to keep your family warm with some healthy hot chocolate? Check out this vegan and dairy free recipe from Ambitious Kitchen!

 

Ingredients (for two servings, increase accordingly):

  • 1 cup light coconut milk, from the can
  • 1 ½ cups unsweetened almond milk
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 
  • Pinch of sea salt

 

Instructions:

Step 1

Place all your ingredients into one small pot, warm it on a low-medium heat setting. Combine the ingredients by whisking them, mix until you’ve gotten rid of all the cocoa clumps. Be sure to not let the mixture broil, as to not burn the almond milk. Warm the mixture for 3-5 minutes, or until steamy.

Step 2

Now that your hot chocolate is warm, you can grab two mugs and serve it! Add your choice of toppings (I prefer marshmallows in my hot chocolate). 

 

According to Ambitious Kitchen, this the nutritional value of this hot chocolate recipe:

Serving: 1 serving

Calories: 166 cal

Carbohydrates: 18.7g

Protein: 1.8g

Fat: 10.2g

Saturated Fat: 7.1g

Fiber: 2.6g

Sugar: 13.6g

Adapted from: https://www.ambitiouskitchen.com/healthy-hot-chocolate/