Hartschuh named as field specialist, Dairy Management and Precision Livestock at Ohio State

By: Cheryl Buck

COLUMBUS, Ohio–Jason Hartschuh has been hired as field specialist, dairy management and precision livestock for Ohio State University Extension in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

Hartschuh, who previously served as an OSU Extension educator for agriculture and natural resources, will begin his new position Nov. 1, said Jacqueline Kirby Wilkins, associate dean and director, OSU Extension.

“In this important position, Jason will provide leadership for developing and implementing a comprehensive Extension and applied research agenda in dairy management and precision livestock farming,” Wilkins said.

Hartschuh will focus on providing unbiased research and education in precision livestock farming, dairy market conditions and policy, dairy facility design for animal welfare, livestock facility ventilation, and dairy calf and heifer care. He will also work to bridge connections between livestock nutritionists and agronomists to help produce high-quality, low-cost feeds.

“We are very pleased to have Jason on board as a field specialist to work collaboratively within Extension and in cross-disciplinary efforts with CFAES and other college professionals,” said Sam Custer, interim assistant director, Agriculture and Natural Resources, OSU Extension. “He will function as a consultant with clientele to address statewide issues as his expertise is needed,” Custer said.

Hartschuh said he looks forward to continuing to build relationships with Ohio livestock farmers and working with them to solve the challenges they are facing, which will ultimately also help to make their farms more sustainable for future generations.

“My primary focus will be on helping Ohio farmers to keep their operations successful by assisting dairy producers with risk management strategies, along with working to bring the latest precision livestock technologies to Ohio producers,” Hartschuh said. “I will also continue some of the work I am currently doing on corn vomitoxin risk management, as this is very important to Ohio dairy and livestock producers.”

Prior to accepting this role, Hartschuh served as an OSU Extension educator in Crawford County for 10 years, focusing on agriculture and natural resources. During this time, he conducted many on-farm research projects, with his latest focus on ways to improve forage production and decrease vomitoxin levels in corn. He also has been active in helping dairy producers understand USDA risk management programs.

Hartschuh joins other OSU Extension field specialists, who each have a particular subject matter focus and provide overall leadership for a comprehensive teaching and applied research program to address statewide issues. Field specialists work to expand existing partnerships, develop new relationships, and foster collaborations across the state, including with university researchers, to complement local Extension educators’ efforts.

Other topics addressed by Extension field specialists include beef cattle; community economics; agronomic systems; farm management; food, nutrition, and wellness; energy development; manure nutrient management systems; agricultural and resource law; food safety; youth nutrition and wellness; family wellness; and organizational and community leadership development.

“Please join OSU Extension in welcoming Jason Hartschuh to this new role, which is important to the continuing success of Ohio’s livestock industry and OSU Extension’s work to support agriculture and natural resources professionals throughout the state,” Wilkins said.

USDA Names Appointees to the Ohio Farm Service Agency State Committee

Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 7, 2022- The USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) today announced appointees who will serve on the Ohio USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) state committee.

Members of the FSA state committee are appointed by Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and are responsible for the oversight of farm programs and county committee operations, resolving program delivery appeals from the agriculture community, maintaining cooperative relations with industry stakeholders, keeping producers informed about FSA programs and operating in a manner consistent with USDA equal opportunity and civil rights policies.

Each FSA state committee is comprised of three to five members including a designated chairperson. The individuals appointed to serve on this committee for Ohio are:

  • Committee Chair Theodore Finnarn – Greenville
  • Fred Deel – Vinton
  • Tracy Hundley – Geneva
  • Thomas Jackson, Jr. – Toledo
  • Mark Mechling – Duncan Falls

“The FSA state committee members play an integral role in the continuity of operations, equitable and inclusive program administration and ensure the overall integrity of services to the nation’s agricultural producers,” said Marcus Graham, FSA Deputy Administrator for Field Operations.  “These individuals have proven themselves to be leaders, early adopters and key influencers in the agriculture industry in their respective states – qualities that will serve them well in these key Biden-Harris Administration leadership positions.

The Farm Service Agency serves farmers, ranchers, foresters, and agricultural partners through the effective, efficient, and equitable delivery of federal agricultural programs. The Agency offers producers a strong safety net through the administration of farm commodity and disaster programs. Additionally, through conservation programs, FSA continues to preserve and protect natural resources and provides credit to agricultural producers who are unable to receive private, commercial credit, including targeted loan funds for beginning, underserved, women and military veterans involved in production agriculture.

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit usda.gov.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender.

Three Extension Professional Named as Field Specialists in Farm Management

By: Cheryl Buck, OSU Extension

Bruce Clevenger, David Marrison, and Eric Richer have been hired as field specialists, farm management for Ohio State University Extension in The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The three new specialists, who previously have served as OSU Extension county educators, will begin their new roles Nov. 1, said Jacqueline Kirby Wilkins, associate dean and director, OSU Extension. “Farm management is an extremely important topic in the agriculture industry, and OSU Extension has determined that the best way to address this top priority is to install several professionals to coordinate their efforts across the state,” Wilkins said. “Bruce, David, and Eric are experts in this field, and each also has a specialized area of interest that will contribute to the industry as a whole and really help meet the needs of our clientele.”

“I am excited that these positions will be able to work in tandem with each other and with our other field specialists,” said Sam Custer, interim assistant director, Agriculture and Natural Resources, OSU Extension. “Each of their experience in the industry and as county educators gives them firsthand knowledge about the challenges of managing a farm business and the scope of the industry throughout the state.”

These new field specialists will also be key players in helping to implement the inaugural work of the college’s new Farm Financial Management Policy Institute, Custer said. The Institute is a joint effort of the CFAES departments of Extension and Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics. Its main mission will be to find solutions to the most critical farm management and agricultural policy issues facing Ohio producers. More information about the Institute’s leadership and work will be available in the near future.

Clevenger said his goal is to help Ohio farmers increase profitability with improved farm business tools that help make the best-informed decisions on the farm. “My primary focus will be teaching and developing outreach materials to meet the needs of Ohio producers and entrepreneurial ag businesses,” Clevenger said. “Farm management is as diverse as crop and animal sciences, so farm managers need modern tools that help their farm business be successful today and able to transition someday to the next generation.”

Prior to this role, Clevenger served as an OSU Extension educator in Defiance County for 28 years, focusing on agriculture and natural resources. He has also served part-time as an area leader for the past four years.

Marrison said his goal is to help Ohio farmers improve profitability and management regardless of farm size, location, or commodities raised and produced.

“I am excited to be transitioning into this role and help all Ohio farm families and agribusinesses to enhance their management, productivity, and profitability,” Marrison said. “This industry is multi-faceted, and I’m glad to be able to use my specialization in farm succession planning and tax management to enhance the efforts of our team across the state.”

Prior to this role, Marrison served as an OSU Extension educator in agriculture and natural resources since 1997. He has served in Coshocton County since 2018, and he was located in Ashtabula County prior to that.

Richer said his goal is to help farmers improve their financial performance and risk management to help meet the growing needs of their farm and today’s diverse consumer.

“Working in production agriculture comes with significant stressors, none more important than financial management,” Richer said. “I’m excited to work with current and beginning farmers in Ohio to improve their understanding of key farm financial management tools to better their farm today and for generations to come.”

Richer previously served as an OSU Extension educator in agriculture and natural resources for 10 years in Fulton County. Prior to that, he worked as an agricultural education instructor at Wauseon High School for 10 years.

Clevenger, Marrison, and Richer join other OSU Extension field specialists, who each have a particular subject matter focus and provide overall leadership for a comprehensive teaching and applied research program to address statewide issues. Field specialists work to expand existing partnerships, develop new relationships, and foster collaborations across the state, including with university researchers, to complement local Extension educators’ efforts.

Other topics addressed by Extension field specialists include beef cattle; community economics; agronomic systems; dairy management and precision livestock; food, nutrition, and wellness; energy development; manure nutrient management systems; agricultural and resource law; food safety; youth nutrition and wellness; family wellness; and organizational and community leadership development.

“Please join OSU Extension in welcoming these three exceptional Extension professionals to this new role,” said Wilkins. “We look forward to demonstrating how this unique collaboration will provide major assistance across the state to ag professionals who are managing a business.”

 

Ukraine: The Breadbasket of Europe

by: Ian Sheldon, Professor and Andersons Chair of Agricultural Marketing, Trade, and Policy, Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, Ohio State University

This short essay, recently published in the Ohio State online magazine Origins: Current Events in Historical Perspective, places the impact of the war in Ukraine on global markets into a historical context.  Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Ukrainian agriculture has returned to its pre-revolutionary position as a major agricultural exporter, largely due to land reform and restructuring of its collective farms.  Land reform has resulted in the development of large-scale, privately-operated farms with owners investing in new technology and introducing best management practices. By 2018, cereal yields had increased by almost 40%, Ukraine re-establishing itself as the “breadbasket of Europe. The full article can be accessed at: https://origins.osu.edu/read/ukraine-food-war-agriculture

Ag Policy and Outlook Conference Recordings Available

by: Holly Davis, Communications and Outreach Manager
CFAES | Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics

Each year the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics (AEDE) in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) hosts the premier forum for Ohio’s agricultural and food industries. Our experts cover topics and issues important to producers, agribusinesses and elected officials. Recordings of these sessions are now available on AEDE’s YouTube channel. The full playlist of all six sessions can be accessed by clicking below. Topics covered include:

  • Consumers, Shopping, and Local Food: What’s Next?
  • Now Hiring: An Ohio Food and Agricultural Labor Update
  • U.S. Trade Policy and Prospects for Agricultural Trade
  • Agricultural Commodity Markets: Trends and Prospects
  • Agricultural Finance Recovery
  • A Conversation About the Next U.S. Farm Bill

Sessions in bold indicate AEDE faculty presenters who are available to do a winter/spring updated presentation upon request (capacity varies by presenter). Please visit our conference website to access presenter contact information if you would like to request an updated virtual session for your population, and to access PDFs of the presentations.

 

Inaugural Director for the Farm Financial Management and Policy Institute (FFMPI) Sought

The Ohio State University Department of Extension, and the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics (AEDE) together are pleased to announce that they are seeking an innovative and transformative inaugural Director for the new Farm Financial Management and Policy Institute (FFMPI).  The FFMPI Director will be appointed as an Associate Professor or Professor in the Department of Extension (75%), with the consideration of a joint teaching and/or applied research appointment in AEDE (not to exceed 25%) or other relevant college at The Ohio State University.

Under the direction of the Associate Dean and Director for Ohio State University Extension (OSUE) in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), in collaboration with the Chair of AEDE, the FFMPI Director will serve as the administrative head of the institute.

The Director will be responsible for leading, developing, and maintaining robust high-quality research, teaching, and Extension programs to find solutions to the most critical farm management and agricultural policy issues facing Ohio producers; including, but not limited to, issues of marketing, finance, risk management, supply chain, human resources, and agricultural policy.

For more information or for the full job description, please follow the link below:

https://osu.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/OSUCareers/job/Columbus-Campus/Inaugural-Director–Farm-Financial-Management-and-Policy-Institute–FFMPI–Associate-Professor-Professor-in-the-Department-of-Extension-and-Department-of-Agricultural—Environmental–and-Development-Economics_R27629-1

 

Or visit: https://hr.osu.edu/careers/   Requisition# R27629

 

Are Starlink Satellites the Solution to Rural Internets Setbacks? 

By: Andrew Holden, Extension Educator, Agriculture & Natural Resources, The Ohio State University Extension

Disclaimer: The purpose of this article is to provide you with information about a new internet service technology and is not an endorsement of the company or their services. I hope that this information will assist you in making informed decisions and help you learn more about the importance of high-speed internet for rural communities.  

Slow internet can frustrate almost anyone, but if you live in a rural area, slow internet, if any, can often be your only choice. The lack of highspeed internet access has been a concern for many years in rural America. While companies slowly improve service and governmental programs try to address these issues, many rural residents are left waiting for faster internet that can’t come soon enough. One company that is attempting to close this digital divide is SpaceX, with their high-speed satellite internet system called Starlink. While Starlink is just beginning to roll out service, the initial results appear to be promising.

Rural communities and Tribal lands have far less access to high-speed internet compared to those in more populated areas. The Federal Communications Commission considers high-speed broadband internet as being able to provide 25 Mbps download speeds and 3 Mbps upload speeds. According to the FCC’s, 2020 Broadband Deployment Report, “22.3% of Americans in rural areas and 27.7% of Americans in Tribal lands lack coverage from fixed terrestrial 25/3 Mbps broadband, as compared to only 1.5% of Americans in urban areas”. Those without high-speed internet access can often be categorized under the phrase ‘last mile’ customers. The last mile problem can be described as the customers at the end of the communication line that are more expensive to reach and located farther apart. As unfortunate as it is, in basic terms, companies would rather run a mile of infrastructure in an area that will yield 25 customers than run a mile for just one customer. Diminishing returns leads to internet companies being unwilling to improve internet in rural areas, as well as less competition for existing providers.

The impact of the digital divide can be felt across the US by those living in small and rural towns. Many aspects of modern life are affected by access to high-speed internet, including education, healthcare, entertainment, and employment. In a report from Michigan State University’s Quello Center, students with slow or limited internet access lacked digital skills and performed lower on standardized tests. In addition to education, 2020 highlighted the future of working remotely and virtual healthcare appointments which rely on faster internet. Rural businesses, from farms to manufacturing, benefit from better internet speeds as well, making it quicker to send and receive information. As technology improves and expands, more people in rural areas are slowly receiving better internet services, but one company that may have the ability to close the gap seemingly overnight is SpaceX.

SpaceX, short for the Space Exploration Technologies Corporation, is an aerospace manufacturer founded by Elon Musk. Musk is also the founder of the popular electric  vehicle company Tesla Motors. One of SpaceX’s business endeavors is providing satellite internet access via a satellite consolation called Starlink. This isn’t like the traditional satellite internet that has been offered over the years. Starlink uses satellites in low Earth orbit that allow for shorter distances and speeds over 100 mbps for those in the beta testing program. Speeds like that would be a huge improvement for almost anyone in a rural area and can be offered remotely to the hardest to reach places. In February, Starlink opened pre-orders to the public and has been slowly filling orders ever since. With the high demand for the service, many orders are slated to be filled by the end of 2021 depending on your location. The current advertised cost for the service is $99.00 per month with the hardware, including a small satellite dish and a router, for a $499.00 onetime payment. On their website Starlink states service will be offered on a first come, first served basis, and is currently taking $100 down payments to get in line for the service. If you are interested in seeing if service is available in your area, or signing up yourself, you can visit www.Starlink.com to do so.

Will Starlink satellites be the solution to our rural internet woes? When considering access to high-speed internet service in rural areas, one thing that has historically lacked were options to choose from. Starlink will provide another option, or possibly the first option, to those living with poor to no access to internet and may solve the last mile problem for many rural communities. Even those who do not use Starlink’s service could benefit from the competition that will encourage traditional internet providers to improve their infrastructure and speeds. Rural communities here in Ohio and across the United States could benefit greatly with better internet access and Starlink is on its way to providing it.

2020 Broadband Deployment Report: https://www.fcc.gov/reports-research/reports/broadband-progress-reports/2020-broadband-deployment-report

Poor Internet connection leaves rural students behind: https://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2020/poor-internet-connection-leaves-rural-students-behind#:~:text=Slow%20Internet%20connections%20or%20limited,college%20admissions%20and%20career%20opportunities.

 

 

 

 

Ask the Expert Sessions to Be Held Live During 2020 Farm Science Review

by: David Marrison, Jeff Workman & Chris Bruynis

For the first time in its nearly 60 year history, Ohio State’s Farm Science Review scheduled for September 22 -24 will not be held in-person.  Instead, a virtual show will be held and the Review will come to you on your laptop or smartphone this year, and for free.  You can watch live streamed talks and recorded videos featuring the latest farm equipment and research to pique your curiosity.

Virtual visitors can find out about the show’s offerings by going to fsr.osu.edu and clicking on an image of the show’s site. Within that image, people can click on the various icons to find the schedules for talks and demos they’re most interested in, such as field demonstrations or “Ask the Expert” talks.

Among the livestreamed talks will be Ask the Expert presentations. Viewers will enter the talks through a Zoom meeting link and be able to post their questions in chat boxes. If you miss any, you can check back after the talks to watch the recordings.

The 20 minute “Ask the Expert” presentations at Farm Science Review are one segment of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and the College of Veterinary Medicine comprehensive Extension Education efforts during the three days of the Farm Science Review. Our experts will share science-based recommendations and solutions to the issues people are facing regarding weather impacts, tariffs, veterinarian medicine, and low commodity prices.

Topics for talks at FSR this year include the risks of transmitting COVID-19 to your animals, the prospects of U.S. agricultural exports abroad, increasing profits from small grains by planting double crops, climate trends, managing cash flow on the farm, farm stress, and rental rates on agricultural land.

To access all prerecorded and livestreamed talks at Farm Science Review, sign up on or after Sept. 8 at fsr.osu.edu.

Click here for a PDF copy of the 2020 FSR Ask the Expert full schedule

A complete list of the Ask the Expert Session are as follows:

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

The Talk on Friday Avenue

Value Chains in Food and Agriculture

9:30-10:30 a.m.

Keeping Backyard Poultry Healthy

Tim McDermott DVM

10:40-11:00 a.m.

Crop Inputs & Margins: Challenges for this Year and Next

Barry Ward

11:00-11:20 a.m.

Farm Stress-Finding the Sunshine in the Storm

Sarah Noggle

11:20-11:40 a.m.

COVID-19: What are the risks to my animals and to myself?

Scott Kenney

11:40-12:00 p.m.

Weather is Always on my Mind

Aaron Wilson

12:00-12:20 p.m.

How to Get $4 Corn

Ben Brown

12:20-12:40 p.m.

Farm neighbor laws: Can we all just get along?

Peggy Hall

12:40-1:00 p.m.

Prospects for US Exports: Pandemic vs. the Phase 1 Agreement with China

Ian Sheldon

1:00-1:20 p.m.

Increasing Small Grains Profitability with Double Crops

Eric Richer

1:20-1:40 p.m.

Making Sense of the Modeling of Infectious Diseases

Rebecca Garabed VMD

1:40-2:00 p.m.

Ohio Cropland Values & Cash Rents: Is Change Coming?

Barry Ward

2:00-2:20 p.m.

Farm CFO: Doing More Than a Tax Return

Bruce Clevenger

2:20-2:40 p.m.

COVID-19: Impacts on Workers and the Food Supply or Where’s the beef? How COVID-19 is altering animal agriculture

Gustavo Schuenemann

DVM 2:40-3:00 p.m.

 

Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Weather is Always on my Mind

Aaron Wilson

10:00-10:20 a.m.

Farming through COVID

Chris Zoller & Dee Jepsen

10:20-10:40 a.m.

Fly Control Issues–Don’t Get Pinkeye!

Jeff Lakritz DVM

10:40-11:00 a.m.

Working Capital-More money going out than coming in, what do I do?

Dianne Shoemaker

11:00-11:20 a.m.

Water Quality and Nutrient Management-Can we make more money and avoid regulation?

Greg LaBarge

11:20-11:40 a.m.

Farm Stress-Finding the Sunshine in the Storm

Sarah Noggle

11:40-12:00 p.m.

Crop Inputs & Margins: Challenges for this Year and Next

Barry Ward

12:00-12:20 p.m.

The Happy ½ Hour on the Economics of Malting Barley in Ohio

Mike Estadt

12:20-12:40 p.m.

Keeping Backyard Poultry Healthy

Tim McDermott DVM

12:40-1:00 p.m.

How to Get $4 Corn

Ben Brown

1:00-1:20 p.m.

COVID-19: What are the risks to my animals and to myself?

Scott Kenney

1:20-1:40 p.m.

Micro Business Data Management

Sid Dasgupta

1:40-2:00 p.m.

Farm neighbor laws: Can we all just get along?

Peggy Hall

2:00-2:20 p.m.

Economics of Parasite Control and Drug Resistance

Antoinette Marsh DVM

2:20-2:40 p.m.

Are you ready for the hearse to arrive?

David Marrison

2:40-3:00 p.m.

Thursday, September 24, 2020

Keeping Horses Healthy: The old gray mare, she ain’t what she used to be

Eric Schroeder DVM

10:00-10:20 a.m.

Making Sense of the Modeling of Infectious Diseases

Rebecca Garabed VMD

10:20-10:40 a.m.

Increasing Small Grains Profitability with Double Crops

Eric Richer

10:40-11:00 a.m.

COVID-19: Impacts on Workers and the Food Supply or Where’s the beef? How COVID-19 is altering animal agriculture

Gustavo Schuenemann, DVM

11:00-11:20 a.m.

Are you ready for the hearse to arrive?

David Marrison

11:20-11:40 a.m.

Working Capital-More money going out than coming in, what do I do?

Dianne Shoemaker

11:40-12:00 p.m.

How to Get $4 Corn

Ben Brown

12:00-12:20 p.m.

Ohio Cropland Values & Cash Rents: Is Change Coming?

Barry Ward

12:20-12:40 p.m.

Weather is Always on my Mind

Aaron Wilson

12:40-1:00 p.m.

Farm neighbor laws: Can we all just get along?

Peggy Hall

1:00-1:20 p.m.

COVID-19: What are the risks to my animals and to myself?

Scott Kenney

1:20-1:40 p.m.

Hay ewe, No hay-No way?

Alejandro Relling

1:40-2:00 p.m.

For more information about the Ask the Expert Sessions, contact David Marrison, OSU Extension Educator at marrison.2@osu.edu

Rory Lewandowski Set to Retire from OSU Extension

Rory Lewandowski, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Wayne County, is retiring from Ohio State University Extension on July 29, 2020.  Rory has served agricultural clientele in Guernsey, Noble,  Athens, and Wayne Counties during his twenty years with Ohio State University Extension.

As an Extension Educator and Certified Crop Advisor (CCA), Rory focused much of his teaching on forages, pesticide use, nutrient management, and farm financial management.  Rory worked tirelessly to serve the needs of his clientele.  Farmers locally and across Ohio benefitted from his knowledge and expertise.  His ability to make every lesson unique and meet the needs of his audience is commendable.

Rory was a member of the Ohio Joint Council of Extension Professionals, National Association of County Agricultural Agents, Epsilon Sigma Phi National Extension Fraternity, Ohio Sheep Industry Association, and Ohio Cattleman’s Association.  Rory was recognized with numerous awards for his exemplary teaching, research, and service, including the Steven D. Ruhl Award for Outstanding Teaching, Leadership, and Service from Ohio State University Extension; Distinguished Service Award from the National Association of County Agricultural Agents; Mid-Career Award from Epsilon Sigma Phi; and the Ohio Sheep Industry Distinguished Service Award.  In addition, Rory was recognized by his professional associations for his outstanding teaching, winning eleven awards.

Rory and his wife Marcia have accepted a three-year assignment in Cambodia with the Mennonite Central Committee.  They will focus on peace and justice as they help people learn to work out their differences as opposed to resorting to violence.  This is not their first experience with the Mennonite Central Committee, having served in Bolivia from 1989 – 1992 and 1996-2000.

Those of us who have had the pleasure of working with Rory are better because of his teaching, leadership, and friendship.  His efforts have made an impact on the communities he has served, and he will carry his style of servant leadership into retirement.

In keeping with Rory’s wishes, an in-person gathering will not be held.  However, anyone interested in sharing memories, pictures, stories or well wishes may do so by clicking on this link: https://www.kudoboard.com/boards/yIDiZU6S

We wish Rory the best in his retirement!

Farm Office Live Webinar Slated for Thursday, June 11 at 9:00 a.m.

OSU Extension is pleased to be offering the a “Farm Office Live” session on Thursday morning, June 11 from 9:00 to 10:30 a.m.  Farmers, educators, and ag industry professionals are invited to log-on for the latest updates on the issues impact our farm economy.

The session will begin with the Farm Office Team answering questions asked over the two weeks.  Topics to be highlighted include:

  • Updates on the CARES Act Payroll Protection Program
  • Prevent Plant Update
  • Business & Industry CARES Act Program
  • EIDL Update
  • CFAP- update on beef classifications and commodity contract eligibility
  • Dicamba Court Decision Update
  • Other legal and economic issues

Plenty of time has been allotted for questions and answers from attendees. Each office session is limited to 500 people and if you miss the on-line office hours, the session recording can be accessed at farmoffice.osu.edu the following day.  Participants can pre-register or join in on Thursday morning at  https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive