Starting a Food Business Webinar Series being offered by OSU Extension

Written by Peggy Kirk Hall, Associate Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law

Direct food marketing in Ohio is hot. The latest USDA survey identified 7,107 Ohio farms with direct food sales–third highest in the nation.  That might be why our program receives more legal inquiries about food sales than any other area of law.  And that is also why we’re hosting a three-part webinar series on “Starting a Food Business,” providing an introduction to what a producer needs to know about selling home-based and farm-raised foods directly to consumers and retailers.

The free webinar series will be from 7—9 p.m. on January 24, February 28, and March 28 in 2023, with these different topics each night:

  • January 24:  Start-Up Basics.  What do you want to sell?  We’ll review initial considerations for selling your food product.  We’ll cover food safety, licensing, legal, and economic considerations for starting up a food business.
  • February 28:  Selling Home-Based Foods.  Learn about food product development, Ohio’s Cottage Food and Home Bakery laws, and requirements for selling canned foods.
  • March 28:  Selling Meat and Poultry.  A look at the economics, processing options, and labeling and licensing requirements for selling meat and poultry.

Our teaching team for the webinar series includes:

  • Nicole Arnold, Asst. Professor and Food Safety Field Specialist for OSU Extension.  Nicole supports food handlers, consumers, and educators with food safety education and risk communication efforts.
  • Peggy Kirk Hall, Assoc. Professor and Agricultural Law Field Specialist for OSU Extension.  Peggy directs OSU Extension’s Agricultural & Resource Law Program and regularly teaches and writes on food laws.
  • Emily Marrison, OSU Extension Educator in Family and Consumer Sciences.  Emily’s food science background provides expertise and insight on food safety, product development, and selling home-based foods.
  • Garth Ruff, Beef Cattle Field Specialist for OSU Extension.  Garth has a background in animal science and specializes in livestock production and marketing, farm management, and meat science.

The webinar series is free, but registration is necessary.  Find details and the registration link at go.osu.edu/foodbusiness

Join OSU Extension for Annie’s Project series this fall in Chillicothe, OH in Ross County.

Annie’s Project is an educational program dedicated to strengthening women’s roles in modern farm enterprises.

This 6-week workshop focuses on five key areas of risk management: human, financial, marketing, production, and legal. Women learn about argi-business practices from experts in their fields. They also form valuable networks with others in the class.

Registration http://go.osu.edu/rossannies2022
Cost is $75.00 per person
Registration deadline is October 24, 2022

Brochure

Session 1: October 27, Rm D

  • Welcome and Introductions
    •Real Colors Personality Test
    •Intro to Risk Management

Session 2: October 31, Rm C

  • Identifying & Managing Legal Liability on the Farm

Session 3: November 3, Rm D

  • Direct Marketing
    •Social Media Presence
    •Overview of Rules & Regs
    •Commodity Marketing
    •Knowing Your Production Costs
    •Different Marketing Tools

Session 4 November 7, Rm D

  • Record Keeping
    •Financial Statements
    •Budgeting & Benchmarking

Session 5: November 10, Rm D

  • Communication and Stress
    •Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate
    •Estate Planning Strategies

Session 6: November 17, Rm D

  • Farm Services Agency
    •Natural Resources Conservation Service
    •Soil and Water Conservation District
    •Crop Insurance

Event Sponsors

Kingston National Bank
Farm Credit Services of Mid America
Atomic Credit Union
LCNB National Bank

 

 

Ag Lender Seminars Offered in October

By Wm. Bruce Clevenger, Ken Ford, Grant Davis, Shelby Tedrow, and Frank Becker

Ohio State University Extension has scheduled four seminars in Ohio for Agricultural Lenders. The dates are Tuesday, October 18th in Ottawa, Ohio; Thursday, October 20 in Urbana, Ohio; Thursday, October 20 in Washington Court House, OH, and Friday, October 21st in Wooster, OH.

These seminars are excellent professional development opportunities for Lenders, Farm Service Agency personnel, county Extension Educators and others to learn about OSU Extension research, outreach programs and current agricultural topics of interest across the state.

2022 Topics and Speakers by Location

Ottawa, OH – October 18th, Putnam Co. Educational Service Center, 124 Putman Parkway, Ottawa, OH  45875

  • Farm Service Agency Loan Program Update – Kurt Leber, Northwest Ohio FSA, District Director – Farm Loan and Farm Program
  • Long Term Care Impacts on Farming Operations – Robert Moore, J.D., Ohio State University Extension, Attorney, OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program
  • Beef and Small Ruminant Enterprise Opportunities – Garth Ruff, Ohio State University Extension, Field Specialist, Beef Cattle
  • Farm Business Analysis with FINPACK and OSUE Farm Office – Clint Schroeder, Ohio State University Extension, Program Coordinator, Farm Business Analysis
  • Examining Land Values, Rents, Crop Input Costs & Margins & New Tax Policy- Barry Ward, Ohio State University Extension, Leader – Production Business Management & Director – OSU Income Tax Schools
  • Ag Commodity Grain Markets: Trends and Prospects – Seungki Lee, PhD, Ohio State University, Dept of Agricultural, Environmental, & Development Economics

Urbana, OH – October 20th, Champaign Co. Community Center Auditorium, 1512 South US Highway 68, Urbana, OH  43078

  • Farm Service Agency Update – Shari Deao, Champaign County Director, FSA
  • Examining Land Values, Rents, Crop Input Costs & Margins in 2023 – Barry Ward, Ohio State University Extension, Leader – Production Business Management & Director – OSU Income Tax Schools
  • Mental Health and the Agriculture Community – Bridget Britton, Behavioral Health Field Specialist, Ag & Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension
  • Update on Alternative Energy in Ohio – Eric Romich, Energy Development Field Specialist, Ohio State University Extension
  • Long Term Care Impacts on Farming Operations – Robert Moore, J.D., Ohio State University Extension, Attorney, OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program

Washington Court House, OH – October 20th, Fayette County Agricultural Center, 1415 US Hwy 22 SW, Washington Court House, OH  43160

  • Farm Service Agency Update – Katie Maust, Fayette County Director, FSA
  • Update on Alternative Energy in Ohio – Eric Romich, Ohio State University Extension, Field Specialist Energy Development
  • Long Term Care Impacts on Farming Operations – Robert Moore, J.D., Ohio State University Extension, Attorney, OSU Agricultural & Resource Law Program
  • Examining Land Values, Rents, Crop Input Costs & Margins & New Tax Policy- Barry Ward, Ohio State University Extension, Leader – Production Business Management & Director – OSU Income Tax Schools
  • Mental Health and the Agriculture Community – Bridget Britton, Behavioral Health Field Specialist, Ag & Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension

Wooster, OH – October 21st, – Buckeye Agricultural Museum, 877 West Old Lincoln Way, Wooster, OH  44691

  • Timber Management – John Kehn, State Service Forester, Ohio Dept of Natural Resources – Division of Forestry
  • Dairy Economics – Jason Hartschuh, Ohio State University Extension, Extension Educator Crawford County
  • Beef and Small Ruminant Enterprise Opportunities – Garth Ruff, Ohio State University Extension, Field Specialist, Beef Cattle
  • Examining Land Values, Rents, Crop Input Costs & Margins & New Tax Policy- Barry Ward, Ohio State University Extension, Leader – Production Business Management & Director – OSU Income Tax Schools
  • Farm Succession Planning – David Marrison, Ohio State University Extension, Extension Educator Coshocton County

The registration cost to attend one of the Ag Lender Seminars is $75.00 and the registration deadline is one week prior to the seminar you are attending. Payments can be made by check by mail or by credit card (by phone only to 419-782-4771). Registration forms are available online at: https://u.osu.edu/aglenderseminars/

Registration questions can be directed to OSU Extension Defiance County 419-782-4771 or email clevenger.10@osu.edu

OSU Extension conducts the seminars from input from Ag Lenders, County Extension Educators and Extension Specialists.  The seminars are designed to provide information that Ag Lenders will use directly with their customers, indirectly within the lending industry, and as professional development for current issues and trends in production agriculture.  OSU Extension has been offering Ag Lenders seminars for nearly 30 years.

OSU Extension Offering Beginner & Small Farm College in Coshocton and Greene Counties

The Extension offices in Coshocton and Greene counties will be hosting the 2022 Beginner & Small Farm College on October 24, 31 and November 7 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. This college is designed to help landowners examine potential ways to increase profits on their small acreage properties. The program is open to all new or aspiring farmers, new rural landowners, small farmers, and farm families.

During this college, participants will be challenged to develop realistic expectations for their new farm business. They will receive information on getting started, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of their property, and developing a farm business plan. Information on farm finances, insurance, liability, labor and marketing will be covered during the college. The topics included in this workshop include:

October 24th-Getting Started on Your New Farm Business

  • Developing real-life expectations for your farm.
  • Examining the available resources and opportunities for your property.
  • Developing a farm business plan, including setting your family and farm mission, goals and objectives.
  • An introduction to marketing and selling agricultural products.

October 31st–Money, Money, Money! Managing your Farm Finances

  • Developing a family and farm balance sheet.
  • Using enterprise budgets to project farm income.
  • Recordkeeping for farm businesses and farm taxes.
  • Managing family and farm income and expenses.

November 7th–There’s More to Farming than Just Growing Stuff!

  • Farm Management for New Farms
  • Setting up your farm business, including choosing a business entity and obtaining employer identification numbers.
  • Farm taxes.
  • Obtaining farm financing.
  • Insurance and liability for farms.
  • Licenses and permits needed for a small farm business.
  • Employer responsibilities related to farm labor and labor laws.

Farm Tour (Date & Location TBD)

Each site host will be planning a farm tour so participants can visit with a successful local farming operation to learn how they started and what they have learned during the development of their farm business.

Registration: The cost is $30 for the first person and $15 for each additional. Registration is limited to the first 50 registrants per location. Registration deadline is October 17th. There are two methods to register for this college.  Registration on-line can be made at: go.osu.edu/smallfarmcollegereg  Registration can also be made by mailing in a registration form to the site host for the location you plan to attend. Click here for registration flyer.

Mail Registrations for Coshocton County Site to:

OSU Extension –Coshocton County

c/o David Marrison

724 South 7thStreet, Room 110

Coshocton, OH 43812

Mail Registrations for Greene County Site to:

OSU Extension –Greene County

c/o Trevor Corboy

100 Fairground Road

Xenia, OH 45385

More Information:

For more information about the Coshocton County location, contact David Marrison at

marrison.2@osu.edu or (740)722-6073

For more information about the Greene County location, contact Trevor Corboy at corboy.3@osu.edu or (937)736-7203

USDA Announces Details for the 2022 Census of Agriculture 

Source: Jodi Halvorson, National Agricultural Statistics Service

America’s farmers and ranchers will soon have the opportunity to be represented in the nation’s only comprehensive and impartial agriculture data for every state, county and territory. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will mail the 2022 Census of Agriculture to millions of agriculture producers across the 50 states and Puerto Rico this fall.

The 2022 Census of Agriculture will be mailed in phases, starting with an invitation to respond online in November followed by paper questionnaires in December. Farm operations of all sizes, urban and rural, which produced and sold, or normally would have sold, $1,000 or more of agricultural product in 2022 are included in the ag census.

“Census of Agriculture data are widely used by federal and local governments, agribusinesses, trade associations, extension educators, and many others to inform decisions about policy and farm programs and services that aid producers and rural communities,” said NASS Administrator Hubert Hamer. “By responding to the Census of Agriculture – by being represented in these important data – producers are literally helping to shape their futures.”

Collected in service to American agriculture since 1840 and now conducted every five years by USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), the Census of Agriculture tells the story and shows the value of U.S. agriculture. It highlights land use and ownership, producer characteristics, production practices, income and expenditures, among other topics. Between ag census years, NASS considers revisions to the questionnaire to document changes and emerging trends in the industry. Changes to the 2022 questionnaire include new questions about the use of precision agriculture, hemp production, hair sheep, and updates to internet access questions.

To learn more about the Census of Agriculture, visit www.nass.usda.gov/agcensus or call 800-727-9540. On the website, producers and other data users can access frequently asked questions, past ag census data, partner tools to help spread the word about the upcoming ag census, special study information, and more. For highlights of these and the latest information on the upcoming Census of Agriculture, follow USDA NASS on twitter @usda_nass.

 

Ohio Farm Custom Rates 2022

By: Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, OSU Extension, Agriculture and Natural Resources; John Barker, Extension Educator Agriculture/Amos Program, Ohio State University Extension Knox County and Eric Richer, Extension Educator Agriculture & Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension Fulton County

Farming is a complex business and many Ohio farmers utilize outside assistance for specific farm-related work. This option is appealing for tasks requiring specialized equipment or technical expertise. Often, having someone else with specialized tools perform tasks is more cost effective and saves time. Farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply, “custom work”. A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider.

Ohio Farm Custom Rates

The “Ohio Farm Custom Rates 2022” publication reports custom rates based on a statewide survey of 223 farmers, custom operators, farm managers, and landowners conducted in 2022. These rates, except where noted, include the implement and tractor if required, all variable machinery costs such as fuel, oil, lube, twine, etc., and labor for the operation.

Some custom rates published in this study vary widely, possibly influenced by:

  • Type or size of equipment used (e.g. 20-shank chisel plow versus a 9-shank)
  • Size and shape of fields,
  • Condition of the crop (for harvesting operations)
  • Skill level of labor
  • Amount of labor needed in relation to the equipment capabilities
  • Cost margin differences for full-time custom operators compared to farmers supplementing current income

Some custom rates reflect discounted rates as the parties involved have family or community relationships, Discounted rates may also occur when the custom work provider is attempting to strengthen a relationship to help secure the custom farmed land in a future purchase, cash rental or other rental agreement. Some providers charge differently because they are simply attempting to spread their fixed costs over more acreage to decrease fixed costs per acre and are willing to forgo complete cost recovery.

New this year, the number of responses for each operation has been added to the data presented. In cases where there were too few responses to statistically analyze, summary statistics are not presented.

Charges may be added if the custom provider considers a job abnormal such as distance from the operator’s base location, difficulty of terrain, amount of product or labor involved with the operation, or other special requirements of the custom work customer.

The data from this survey are intended to show a representative farming industry cost for specified machines and operations in Ohio. As a custom farm work provider, the average rates reported in this publication may not cover your total costs for performing the custom service. As a customer, you may not be able to hire a custom service for the average rate published in this factsheet.

It is recommended that you calculate your own costs carefully before determining the custom rate to charge or pay. It may be helpful to compare the custom rates reported in this fact sheet with machinery costs calculated by economic engineering models available online. The following resources are available to help you calculate and consider the total costs of performing a given machinery operation.

Farm Machinery Cost Estimates, available by searching University of Minnesota.

Illinois Farm Management Handbook, available by searching University of Illinois farmdoc.

Estimating Farm Machinery Costs, available by searching Iowa State University agriculture decision maker and machinery management.

Fuel price changes may cause some uncertainty in setting a custom rate. Significant volatility in diesel price over the last several months has caused some concern for custom rate providers that seek to cover all or most of the costs associated with custom farm operations. The approximate price of diesel fuel during the survey period ranged from $4.50 – $5.25 per gallon for off-road (farm) usage. As a custom farm work provider, if you feel that your rate doesn’t capture your full costs due to fuel price increases you might consider a custom rate increase or fuel surcharge based on the increase in fuel costs.

For example, let’s assume the rate you planned to charge for a chisel plow operation was based on $4.50 per gallon diesel costs and the current on-farm diesel price is $5.50 per gallon. This is a $1 per gallon increase. The chisel plow operation uses 1.15 gallons of fuel per acre so the added fuel surcharge could be set at $1.15 per acre (1.15 gallons x $1 gallon).

The complete “Ohio Farm Custom Rates 2022” publication is available online at the Farm Office website:

https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-management/custom-rates-and-machinery-costs

 

 

 

Planning for the Future of Your Farm Workshop Slated for July 29 in Darke County

by: Taylor Dill, OSU Extension Extension Educator

Many farms are lost in the modern farm community because of an unsuccessful transition from one generation to the next. The farm transition is a difficult task to plan for financially and can be even more difficult to just talk about between family members. It is estimated that more than half of farmers and ranchers do not have an estate plan. Estate planning is crucial for a successful transition to the next generation, while also keeping the family together. Ohio State Extension has many farm management specialists to assist in this undertaking.

Join OSU Extension Darke County in welcoming David Marrison, Coshocton County Extension Educator and Robert Moore OSU Farm Law Attorney for a Planning for the Future of Your Farm event! David and Robert will be covering; developing goals for estate and succession, planning for the transition of control, planning for the unexpected, communication and conflict during the farm transfer, selecting an attorney, legal tools and strategies, developing your team, and getting your affairs in order. David and Robert are well renowned in extension and their mission is to save family farms from collapse because of poor transition planning.

The event will be July 29th at the Anderson’s Ethanol Plant Meeting Room, 5728 Sebring Warner Rd. #E, Greenville starting at 8:30 a.m. and ending at 4 p.m. The cost for the class is $45 covering two family members and course materials. Lunch has been generously provided by Farm Credit. Pre-registration is required as seats are limited! Please RSVP to Dill.138@osu.edu or call 937-548-5215

 

 

How Will the Invasion of Ukraine Affect U.S. Agriculture?

by: Ian Sheldon, Professor and Andersons Chair of Agricultural Marketing, Trade, and Policy, Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, Ohio State University and Chris Zoller, Associate Professor and Extension Educator, Agriculture & Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension – Tuscarawas County

Russia’s Invasion of Ukraine: The Global Impact

The shock to global commodity markets following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is expected to be the largest in the post-war period, and certainly since the oil crisis of the 1970s.  Over the past 30 year, the two countries have become major agricultural exporters, accounting for a quarter of global grains trade in the 2021-22 season (International Grains Council, March 9, 2022).  Across key commodities, they account for a 34, 18, 27 and 75 percent share of volume traded of world wheat, corn, barley, and sunflower oil respectively (International Food Policy Research Institute, February 24, 2022).  With Russia blockading ports on the Black Sea, 16 million tons of grain are currently stranded in Ukraine, USDA forecasting Ukrainian-Russian wheat exports to fall by 7 million tons in 2021-22, Australian and Indian exports only partially filling the gap (USDA/WASDE Report, March 9, 2022)   Also, despite reports of some spring crops being planted in Ukraine, outgoing Agriculture Minister Roman Leshchenko expects total area sown to be reduced by 19 million acres (Reuters, March 22, 2022).

Not surprisingly a market shock of this magnitude has affected both the volatility and level of prices, wheat futures at one point moving above $14/bushel, and eventually falling back to just over $10/bushel, reflecting uncertainty among traders about the invasion.  In turn, the increase in grain prices, are having a significant effect on global food prices and hence food security.  Even before the invasion, several factors were already driving up food prices, including poor harvests in South America, strong global demand, supply chain issues, reduced global stocks of grains and oilseeds, and an input cost squeeze mostly due to rising fertilizer prices.  Adding in the effect of the invasion, global food prices are now reaching levels not seen since the so-called “Arab Spring” of the early 2010s (UN/FAO, March 2022).

The steep decline in grain exports has led to institutions such as the UN World Food Program expressing concern about global food security, the cost of buying food forecast to rise by $23/month – a significant increase to those living off $1.90/day, the World Bank definition of poverty (New York Times, March 20, 2022).  Countries in the Middle East and North Africa such as Egypt, the Lebanon and Tunisia are very dependent on grain imports from Ukraine and Russia, the risk of food price inflation stirring up political and social unrest.  On top of this, there is concern other countries will adopt “beggar-thy-neighbor”-type controls on grain exports to protect their own populations, that will simply intensify the food price spike (Financial Times, March 23, 2022).

Implications for U.S. Agriculture

We are experiencing higher fuel prices at the pump, grain markets (especially wheat) rallied on news of the invasion and resulting sanctions, and the invasion created further uncertainty for fertilizer costs.  What does the future hold for fuel, fertilizer, and grain prices?  It is impossible to say with certainty, but the market does not like uncertainty.  In other words, expect a great deal of continued volatility.  Harwood Schaffer and Darrel Ray, Agriculture Policy Analysis Center at the University of Tennessee (MidAmerica Farmer Grower, March 4, 2022), make the following points about possible impacts:

  • Russia may try to broker a deal with China to avoid trade sanctions.  If this happens, the U.S. may be able to capture markets previously served by Russia.
  • If the war continues, who will harvest the Ukraine wheat crop and how will it be transported?
  • If the consensus is that the wheat crop will be short, expect an increase in prices.
  • If commodity prices do increase, will it be enough to cover rising fuel and fertilizer costs?

Scott Stiles, agricultural economist, University of Arkansas, says the war may provide an opportunity for the U.S. to sell more corn to China and the European Union, who have historically purchased corn from Ukraine (Ryan McGeeney, U of A Division of Agriculture, March 3, 2022).

University of Illinois agricultural economists Gary Schnitkey, Nick Paulson, and Krista Swanson, and Carl Zulauf, Emeritus Professor, Ohio State University (Weekly Farm Economics, March 29, 2022), offer the following potential impacts:

  • Wheat has seen positive price movement.  Because corn is a substitute feed grain for wheat, corn prices may see a greater increase than soybeans.
  • Do not underestimate the resourcefulness of Ukrainian farmers.  However, continued fighting and planting disruptions may lead to higher prices.
  • Expect continued price and availability uncertainties in the fertilizer market.

Summary

The invasion of Ukraine is proving a significant shock to global commodity markets, with the very real prospect of worsening global food insecurity as net food importing countries face shortages of key staples such as wheat.  In the short run, the expectation is that there are real limitations on the ability of the U.S. to meet the shortfall: winter wheat is already in the ground, stocks are low, drought conditions are likely to impact yields in states such as Kansas, and farmers face an input price squeeze (Financial Times, March 14, 2022).  Not surprisingly, there is political pressure on USDA to allow farmers to plant on land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) without penalty (Reuters, April 1, 2022).

USDA Report: Small Family Farms Produce Majority of Poultry and Eggs, and Hay

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR in Tuscarawas County &  Tony Nye, Extension Educator, ANR in Clinton County

The United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service (USDA ERS), in their December 2021 Charts of Note, examined the value of production of seven commodities.  The purpose of the analysis was to determine the percentage of each by type (family and non-family farms) and size of operation.

The USDA ERS defines family farms as those where the principal operator and those associated with the principal operator own most of the business.  USDA ERS defines nonfamily farms as those where the principal operator and those related to the principal operator do not own a majority of the business.

USDA ERS classifies family farms by size, according to gross cash farm income (GCFI):

  • Small family farms – GCFI less than $350,000
  • Midsize family farms – between $350,000 and $999,999 in GCFI
  • Large-scale family farms – $1 million or more in GCFI

The table below summarizes the value of production by type and size of operation.  Small family farms produced the majority of hay (59%) and poultry and eggs (49%) in 2020.  Small family farms also accounted for just over one-quarter of beef production.

 

Ohio State University Extension works with Small Farm Producers throughout Ohio.

Since 2005, Ohio State has been addressing producer needs for small farm production. Our two main efforts include an eight-week Small Farm College course and the Small Farm Conference.

The Mission of OSU Extension Small Farm Programs:

To provide a greater understanding of production practices, economics of land use choices, assessment of personal and natural resources, marketing alternatives, and the identification of sources of assistance for new and small farms in Ohio.

Small Farm Program Objectives:

  • To improve the economic development of small farms in Ohio.
  • To help small farm landowners and families diversify their opportunities into successful new enterprises and new markets.
  • To improve agricultural literacy among small farm landowners not actively involved in agricultural production.

Small Farm Conference

‘Sowing Seeds for Success’  –  the 2022 Small Farm Conference is scheduled for March 12th from 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the Mansfield OSU Campus in Ovalwood Hall.  The campus is just minutes from I-71 and US Rt 30.

This conference is for small farm owners who want to learn more about how to make their farms work better for them or expand their operations. This conference is also useful for those new to agriculture who are looking for ways to utilize acreage. Landowners can attend workshops and presentations on these topics:

    • Horticulture
    • Produce Production
    • Natural Resources
    • Livestock
    • Specialty Crops
    • Farm Management
    • Marketing
    • Miscellaneous Topics

This conference is designed to help participants learn tips and techniques for diversifying their opportunities into successful new enterprises and markets. Combined with a trade show, participants learn new ways to improve economic growth and development on their farms.

Cost is $75.00 per person. Please visit: https://morrow.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/small-farm-conference  for conference and registration details or call OSU Extension Morrow County 419-947-1070.

The New and Small Farm College

The New and Small Farm College is a seven-week program that introduces new and seasoned farmers to a wide variety of topics. The program teaches participants how to set goals, plan, budget, how to manage financial and farm records, and where to find resources if they choose to start a small farming operation. Other subjects include legal issues, farm insurance and marketing.

Coming in August 2022, this program will be available.  Watch this website for updates on times and locations: https://u.osu.edu/gofarmohio/programs/new-and-small-farm-college/

The cost to attend is $125 and includes a resource binder, meals, all programs including Farm Science Review admission, and a soil test. Additional family members can register for $100 per person (excludes binder).

 

 

 

OSU Extension to Host 2022 East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension will host the 7th Annual East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference. The conference is planned for Friday, March 25 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum, 3266 Dyewood Road SW, Carrollton, OH 44615. All women and young women (high school age) who are interested, involved in, or want to become involved with food, agricultural, or natural resources production or small business are encouraged to attend.

East Ohio Women in Ag Conference 2022 Flyer

The conference program features a networking fair and sixteen breakout sessions presented by OSU Extension educators, producers, and partner agencies. Sessions this year are focused around four themes: Natural Resources, Plants & Animals, Home & Family, and Special Interest (includes break-out with Ohio FFA State Officers). The conference keynote will be led by Bridget Britton, OSU Extension Behavioral Health Field Specialist. She and her team will lead participants through “Stoic or Stressed? Talking through difficult topics in a safe space.”

Registered participants, community organizations, or businesses interested in sponsorship can contact 740-461-6136.

Interested individuals can register for the conference online at go.osu.edu/eowia2022. Cost of the conference is $55 for adult participants and $30 for students.  Conference fee includes conference participation, breakfast, lunch, and conference handouts. Deadline for registration is Friday, March 11. For additional information, please contact Emily Marrison, OSU Extension Coshocton County at 740-622-2265.

Stay connected with the Ohio Women in Agriculture Learning Network on Facebook @OHwomeninag or subscribe to the Ohio Women in Agriculture blogsite at u.osu.edu/ohwomeninag .