Agricultural Outlook from the Farm Science Review  

by: Professors Ani Katchova, Farm Income Enhancement Chair, Seungki Lee, Ian Sheldon, Andersons Chair of Agricultural Marketing, Trade, and Policy, Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics (AEDE), and Chris Zoller, Agriculture & Natural Resources Ohio State University Extension (OSUE) – Tuscarawas County

At this year’s Farm Science Review a panel of AEDE economists chaired by OSUE’s Chris Zoller answered questions about global uncertainty and its impact on agriculture.  Their outlook for farm income, production, and global markets is summarized here.

Farm Income Outlook

Net farm income is expected to increase in 2022, up 5.2 percent from last year, mostly due to higher cash receipts which are offset by lower government payments and higher production expenses (ERS-USDA). High commodity prices are expected to more than buffer the largest-ever year-to-year increase in production expenses. However, farm income is projected to decline in 2023 and 2024 as commodity prices are expected to soften, and then hold steady through 2027 (USDA, Baselines).

The demand for farmland has surged this year due to higher farm income and high farm liquidity. With the return to normal supply of cropland for sale, farmers who have experienced several years of high grain prices have continued to strongly bid for land. Individual investors have also entered the land market as farmland is considered a safe, long-term inflation-hedging investment. This combined heightened demand propelled land prices higher in 2022. This year’s high inflation rate at 8.5 percent is another leading contributor to buoyant land values, yet high interest rates have counteracted it.

In line with high farm income, agricultural credit conditions have also remained strong in 2022, but the pace of improvement has slowed, with higher repayment rates and lower demand for agricultural loans (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City). In the past couple of years, the total agricultural loan volume has declined, mostly because of higher farm incomes resulting in fewer production loans. The trends for Ohio farms have followed those for US farms, although the reduction in production loans has not been as large for Ohio.  The rise in interest rates (currently about 3 percent and expected to increase more) to the levels seen in 2018 and 2019 are a major factor contributing to lower loan demand. Overall, an economy with an inflation rate at about 8.5 percent, which boosts land values but also increases farm production expenses, and a higher interest rate, will dampen the farmer’s ability to service debt.

Farm financial performance has improved in 2022 as the agricultural economy has been recovering from the pandemic. Agricultural loan delinquency rates have remained low this year, at 1.9 percent as of the end of the second quarter of 2022, compared to as much as 4 percent in 2012 (FDIC). For Ohio, the delinquency rate was even lower at 1.5 percent, with a total of two Chapter 12 bankruptcies in 2022 so far (FDIC and US Courts). Farm balance sheets are stronger this year than 2021 with an inflation-adjusted increase in assets and equity of about 4% each and a decrease in inflation-adjusted debt by 1.2 percent (ERS-USDA). The increase in farm income is associated with the first decline in total debt since 2012 and the bankruptcy rate being at its lowest level since 2004.

Negative Shifts in Supply and Demand Added to Grain Market Uncertainty

In the September WASDE report, USDA adjusted down its forecasts of both production and usage for major grains. So far, the drop in production has been somewhat overwhelming, resulting in persistently high commodity prices: corn and soybeans were anticipated to have average season prices of $6.75 and $14.35 per bushel respectively. However, prices are equilibrium outcomes, so they are limitedly instructive in a current market featured by contemporaneous shifts in both supply and demand. Consequently, it is important to explore both sides of the market.

In comparison to August, corn and soybean planted acreage and yield expectations have decreased, resulting in total corn and soybean production expected to be down by 5 and 1.5 percent respectively from 2021. Forecast corn and soybean use were reduced by 250 million and 93 million bushels from August. Exports drove the drop. Good weather in its northeast regions is boosting China’s harvest, which will reduce demand for US grain. Brazil is also expected to produce record volumes of corn and soybeans according to the latest observation of planting. Compared to last year, 21 percent more soybeans and 9 percent more corn are expected. As La Niña is expected to be less influential in 2023, the optimistic forecasts for Brazilian production should be taken seriously as it could be the coming season’s most bearish influence.

Lastly, several wildcards exist outside the market. First, the Federal Reserve has raised interest rates to 3 percent this year. Despite interest rates not being highly correlated with commodity prices, such a rate hike can have critical implications. The drastic increase in rates will certainly increase farm capital costs and reduce price competitiveness due to a strong dollar in export markets. Thus, a higher interest rate may burden farmers in terms of both supply and demand. Second, the ongoing war in Ukraine could be another game changer as it could induce further tightening of the energy market if the war continues through winter.

Volatility Will Characterize the Global Market

The global market outlook will be one characterized by continuing price volatility, due to the ongoing effects of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the impact of drought on global grain production, slow rebuilding of stocks, along with various policy choices.  After two months of the export deal brokered by Turkey and the United Nations (UN) to get Ukrainian grain out through the Black Sea, 218 vessels have already left carrying a total of 4.85 million tonnes, only marginally denting the 20-25 million tonnes trapped in storage (Reuters, September 18).  With Ukrainian exports down 46 percent this year (Reuters, September 25), Russia finding it difficult to export its grain (Bloomberg, September 22), and persistent drought conditions in the United States, South America, and Europe affecting yields, not surprisingly futures prices for wheat, corn and soybeans have risen 17, 28, and 14 percent respectively over the past 12 months (Wall Street Journal, September 21, 2022).

At the same time, commodity prices are proving sensitive to policy pronouncements.  Threats by President Putin to stop Ukrainian grain exports in early-September pushed up wheat futures by 7 percent (Bloomberg, September 7, 2022), while his recent mobilization of Russian reservists and his suggested use of nuclear weapons in Ukraine immediately pushed up both wheat and corn futures (Wall Street Journal, September 21, 2022).  On top of this, India recently announced a 20 percent duty on two thirds of its rice exports, placing more pressure on already high levels of global food insecurity (Bloomberg, August 29, 2022).  With global grain supplies currently remaining tight, analysts are predicting two years of good harvests will be needed to rebuild global grain stocks and relieve market pressure (Wall Street Journal, September 20, 2022).

Planning for 2023

As we review the topics presented by our AEDE experts, phrases like declining farm income, inflation, the war in Ukraine, supply and demand, and global policy movements are evident.  It is becoming increasingly more important to analyze your current situation, critically analyze where and how each dollar is spent, develop a plan (along with back-up plans), execute your plan, and monitor performance.

As you wrap-up harvest, assemble a team of advisors (examples include accountant, lender, agronomist, nutritionist, and Extension Educator) to discuss your production and financial performance in 2022, plan strategies for the coming year, and schedule regular check-in times to monitor progress.

OSU Extension Offering Beginner & Small Farm College in Coshocton and Greene Counties

The Extension offices in Coshocton and Greene counties will be hosting the 2022 Beginner & Small Farm College on October 24, 31 and November 7 from 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. This college is designed to help landowners examine potential ways to increase profits on their small acreage properties. The program is open to all new or aspiring farmers, new rural landowners, small farmers, and farm families.

During this college, participants will be challenged to develop realistic expectations for their new farm business. They will receive information on getting started, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of their property, and developing a farm business plan. Information on farm finances, insurance, liability, labor and marketing will be covered during the college. The topics included in this workshop include:

October 24th-Getting Started on Your New Farm Business

  • Developing real-life expectations for your farm.
  • Examining the available resources and opportunities for your property.
  • Developing a farm business plan, including setting your family and farm mission, goals and objectives.
  • An introduction to marketing and selling agricultural products.

October 31st–Money, Money, Money! Managing your Farm Finances

  • Developing a family and farm balance sheet.
  • Using enterprise budgets to project farm income.
  • Recordkeeping for farm businesses and farm taxes.
  • Managing family and farm income and expenses.

November 7th–There’s More to Farming than Just Growing Stuff!

  • Farm Management for New Farms
  • Setting up your farm business, including choosing a business entity and obtaining employer identification numbers.
  • Farm taxes.
  • Obtaining farm financing.
  • Insurance and liability for farms.
  • Licenses and permits needed for a small farm business.
  • Employer responsibilities related to farm labor and labor laws.

Farm Tour (Date & Location TBD)

Each site host will be planning a farm tour so participants can visit with a successful local farming operation to learn how they started and what they have learned during the development of their farm business.

Registration: The cost is $30 for the first person and $15 for each additional. Registration is limited to the first 50 registrants per location. Registration deadline is October 17th. There are two methods to register for this college.  Registration on-line can be made at: go.osu.edu/smallfarmcollegereg  Registration can also be made by mailing in a registration form to the site host for the location you plan to attend. Click here for registration flyer.

Mail Registrations for Coshocton County Site to:

OSU Extension –Coshocton County

c/o David Marrison

724 South 7thStreet, Room 110

Coshocton, OH 43812

Mail Registrations for Greene County Site to:

OSU Extension –Greene County

c/o Trevor Corboy

100 Fairground Road

Xenia, OH 45385

More Information:

For more information about the Coshocton County location, contact David Marrison at

marrison.2@osu.edu or (740)722-6073

For more information about the Greene County location, contact Trevor Corboy at corboy.3@osu.edu or (937)736-7203

USDA Report: Small Family Farms Produce Majority of Poultry and Eggs, and Hay

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR in Tuscarawas County &  Tony Nye, Extension Educator, ANR in Clinton County

The United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service (USDA ERS), in their December 2021 Charts of Note, examined the value of production of seven commodities.  The purpose of the analysis was to determine the percentage of each by type (family and non-family farms) and size of operation.

The USDA ERS defines family farms as those where the principal operator and those associated with the principal operator own most of the business.  USDA ERS defines nonfamily farms as those where the principal operator and those related to the principal operator do not own a majority of the business.

USDA ERS classifies family farms by size, according to gross cash farm income (GCFI):

  • Small family farms – GCFI less than $350,000
  • Midsize family farms – between $350,000 and $999,999 in GCFI
  • Large-scale family farms – $1 million or more in GCFI

The table below summarizes the value of production by type and size of operation.  Small family farms produced the majority of hay (59%) and poultry and eggs (49%) in 2020.  Small family farms also accounted for just over one-quarter of beef production.

 

Ohio State University Extension works with Small Farm Producers throughout Ohio.

Since 2005, Ohio State has been addressing producer needs for small farm production. Our two main efforts include an eight-week Small Farm College course and the Small Farm Conference.

The Mission of OSU Extension Small Farm Programs:

To provide a greater understanding of production practices, economics of land use choices, assessment of personal and natural resources, marketing alternatives, and the identification of sources of assistance for new and small farms in Ohio.

Small Farm Program Objectives:

  • To improve the economic development of small farms in Ohio.
  • To help small farm landowners and families diversify their opportunities into successful new enterprises and new markets.
  • To improve agricultural literacy among small farm landowners not actively involved in agricultural production.

Small Farm Conference

‘Sowing Seeds for Success’  –  the 2022 Small Farm Conference is scheduled for March 12th from 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the Mansfield OSU Campus in Ovalwood Hall.  The campus is just minutes from I-71 and US Rt 30.

This conference is for small farm owners who want to learn more about how to make their farms work better for them or expand their operations. This conference is also useful for those new to agriculture who are looking for ways to utilize acreage. Landowners can attend workshops and presentations on these topics:

    • Horticulture
    • Produce Production
    • Natural Resources
    • Livestock
    • Specialty Crops
    • Farm Management
    • Marketing
    • Miscellaneous Topics

This conference is designed to help participants learn tips and techniques for diversifying their opportunities into successful new enterprises and markets. Combined with a trade show, participants learn new ways to improve economic growth and development on their farms.

Cost is $75.00 per person. Please visit: https://morrow.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/small-farm-conference  for conference and registration details or call OSU Extension Morrow County 419-947-1070.

The New and Small Farm College

The New and Small Farm College is a seven-week program that introduces new and seasoned farmers to a wide variety of topics. The program teaches participants how to set goals, plan, budget, how to manage financial and farm records, and where to find resources if they choose to start a small farming operation. Other subjects include legal issues, farm insurance and marketing.

Coming in August 2022, this program will be available.  Watch this website for updates on times and locations: https://u.osu.edu/gofarmohio/programs/new-and-small-farm-college/

The cost to attend is $125 and includes a resource binder, meals, all programs including Farm Science Review admission, and a soil test. Additional family members can register for $100 per person (excludes binder).

 

 

 

OSU Extension to Host 2022 East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension will host the 7th Annual East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference. The conference is planned for Friday, March 25 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum, 3266 Dyewood Road SW, Carrollton, OH 44615. All women and young women (high school age) who are interested, involved in, or want to become involved with food, agricultural, or natural resources production or small business are encouraged to attend.

East Ohio Women in Ag Conference 2022 Flyer

The conference program features a networking fair and sixteen breakout sessions presented by OSU Extension educators, producers, and partner agencies. Sessions this year are focused around four themes: Natural Resources, Plants & Animals, Home & Family, and Special Interest (includes break-out with Ohio FFA State Officers). The conference keynote will be led by Bridget Britton, OSU Extension Behavioral Health Field Specialist. She and her team will lead participants through “Stoic or Stressed? Talking through difficult topics in a safe space.”

Registered participants, community organizations, or businesses interested in sponsorship can contact 740-461-6136.

Interested individuals can register for the conference online at go.osu.edu/eowia2022. Cost of the conference is $55 for adult participants and $30 for students.  Conference fee includes conference participation, breakfast, lunch, and conference handouts. Deadline for registration is Friday, March 11. For additional information, please contact Emily Marrison, OSU Extension Coshocton County at 740-622-2265.

Stay connected with the Ohio Women in Agriculture Learning Network on Facebook @OHwomeninag or subscribe to the Ohio Women in Agriculture blogsite at u.osu.edu/ohwomeninag .

 

Soybean Farmers Invited to Participate in Survey

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County & David Marrison, Extension Educator, ANR, Coshocton County

Dr. Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois, and Dr. Carl Zulauf, Emeritus Professor, The Ohio State University, are conducting an online survey of soybean growers in nine soybean producing states, including Ohio. The nine states represent 75% of U.S. soybean production.

The researchers intend to measure the impact of each communication channel – mass media, social media, and interpersonal meetings – on farmers’ decision-making to adopt a new digital technology. This survey is focused on soybean producers in these states: Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, and North Dakota. The results will support new research and contribute in a practical way to increase knowledge about the most efficient communication channels for the dissemination of digital agriculture technologies.

The survey takes approximately five minutes to complete, and all data will be kept confidential.  If interested, you can provide your email address to receive a copy of the final survey results.

If you are interested in participating in this survey, please click here: https://go.illinois.edu/farmdocsurvey

 

2022 Agricultural Outlook and Policy Meetings Set to Kickoff

by: Mike Estadt, OSU Extension, estadt.3@osu.edu

The Ohio State University Extension is pleased to announce the Regional Ag Outlook and Policy Meetings for 2022.  Meetings will be held around the state beginning the last of January and ending in March.

Speakers will address a myriad of topics of agriculture interest  here in Ohio as well as across the Corn Belt.  Programs will include presentations on Grain Market Outlook, Ag Law Updates, Dairy Industry 2022, Ohio’s Changing Climate, Farm Policy and Farm Bill, SB 52: Utility Solar Legislative, Farm Real Estate and Cash Rent Trends, Ag Input Price Projections and Federal Tax Updates.

New to this year’s program  is the statewide sponsorship and support of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

“We are proud to partner with Ohio State University  Extension educators across the state to support this year’s agronomy, outlook and grower meetings.  We value this partnership and look forward to supporting programs that bring value to our members farm businesses”, according to Brad Moffitt, Director of Membership and Market Development for the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

The following table lists the scheduled Outlook programs with contact information to register.

 

Hosts: Union/Madison/Champaign

DATE: January 28th

Time: 8:30 a.m.

Place: Der Dutchman Restaurant, 445 S. Jefferson Ave, Plain City, Ohio  43064

Speakers:

Barry Ward, Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Ben Brown, Grain Marketing Outlook

Robert Moore, Farm Transition and Taxes

Contact  Amanda Douridas (douridas.1@osu.edu)

Registration: Go.osu.edu/PlainCityOutlook

 

Host: Defiance County

Date: January 31, 2022

Time: 6:00-9:00 p.m.

Place: Jewell Community Center, 7900 Independence Road, Defiance, OH  43512

Speakers:

Barry Ward, Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Matt Roberts, Grain Marketing Outlook

 

Contact: Bruce Clevenger (Clevenger.1@osu.edu)

Registration:  https://defiance.osu.edu/

Host: Wayne County

Date: January 13, 2022

Place: Buckeye Ag Museum, 877 West Old Lincoln Way,  Wooster, OH   44691

Time: 8:00 a.m-12:00

Speakers:

Barry Ward, Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall,  Ag Law Update

Aaron Wilson, Ohio’s Changing Climate

Dianne Shoemaker, Dairy Industry 2022

 

Contact: Haley Zynda (zynda.7@osu.edu)

Host: Clinton County

Date January 14, 2022

Time: 7:00 a.m. Breakfast  7:30 a.m. Program

Place: OSU Extension Office, 111 S. Nelson Ave. Wilmington, Ohio  45177

Speakers:

Barry Ward Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall, Ag Law Update

Aaron Wilson, Ohio’s Changing Climate

Eric Romich, SB 52 Solar Farm Legislation

Carl Zulauf,  Farm Bill 2023

Contact:  Tony Nye (Nye.1@osu.edu)

Host: Crawford County

Date: February 1, 2022

Place: Wayside Chapel Community Center, 2341 Kersetter Rd., Bucyrus, OH 44820

Time: 5:00 p.m.

Speakers:

Peggy Hall Ag Law Update

Carl Zulauf Farm Bill 2023

Matt Roberts, Grain Marketing Outlook

Aaron Wilson  Ohio’s Changing Climate

 

Contact: Jason Hartschuh (hartschuh.11@osu.edu)

Host: Pickaway County

Date  Feb 2, 2022

Place: Emmett Chapel 318 Tarlton Rd, Circleville, Ohio 43113

Time: 8:00 a.m.

Speakers:

Barry Ward Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Matt Roberts,  Grain Marketing Outlook

Carl Zulauf,  Farm Bill 2023

 

Contact: Mike Estadt (estadt.3@osu.edu)

Host: Muskingum County

Date: February 14, 2022

Place: Muskingum County Convention Center, 205 N. 5th St. Zanesville, Ohio 43701

Time: 9:00 a.m.

Speakers:

Barry Ward  Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall,  Ag Law Update

Matt Roberts,  Grain Marketing Outlook

Carl Zulauf,  Farm Bill 2023

Contact: Clifton Martin (martin.2242@osu.edu)

Host:  Darke County

Date: March 25, 2022

Place: Romers Catering,118 E Main St, Greenville, OH 45331     

Time  10:00-2:00 p.m.

Speakers:

Barry Ward,  Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall Ag Law Update

Aaron Wilson  Ohio’s Changing Climate

Contact Taylor Dill (Dill.138@osu.edu)

 

 

Factors Behind Production Gains in Brazil

by: Guil Signorini, Department of Horticulture and Crop Science | The Ohio State University

Last month this column featured an article about souring fertilizer and chemical costs faced by Brazilian farmers as the 2020/2021 season unfolds. The latest developments show that the Southern farmers have not changed planting and growing plans due to these challenges. On the contrary, projections from CONAB (Federal Agency of Agricultural Supply) indicate that grain growers intensified production. Soybean production is expected to reach 4.9 billion bushels, a 7% increase over the last season, and the highest production mark ever registered. Projections for the corn crop are just as significant. Estimations indicate that the country will produce 4.6 billion bushels, a vital recovery from last season’s drop in production due to drought.

Nevertheless, what catches our curiosity is how Brazilian farmers have managed to improve production projections considering the pandemic and the severe pressure from high ag input costs. What can we learn from our fellow farmers? What marketing factors are favoring production expansion?

One important factor is the likely price stability for both commodities until May 2022, when most growers should be close to the season wrap-up. Ipea (Institute for Applied Economic Research) reported in December that international prices are expected to remain stable or experience marginal increments. Future prices from CME Chicago corroborate with Ipea. Soybean contracts for May 2022 were settled at $12.73 per bushel, and corn contracts were traded at $5.86 per bushel on December 6, slightly higher than current prices in Chicago.

Two other factors deserve attention: the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices and the use of innovative financial tools to fund the production. On the agricultural practices front, no-tillage, use of beneficial rhizobacteria, and crop-livestock-forest integration systems are examples of practices listed in a recent report from MAPA (Brazil’s Ministry of Agriculture) to explain the findings reported in the USDA International Agricultural Productivity document. In the latter document, USDA estimates a Total Factor Productivity (TFP) index. The TFP index reflects the overall rate of technical and efficiency change in production over time. Computations return positive estimates for the index when total agricultural output grows faster than the sum of inputs utilized. Brazil’s index figures above the world’s average with a 1.7% annual growth rate in the last years of analysis (2015-2019). The world’s average is 1.2%, and the U.S. index holds a yearly growth rate of 0.04%. Brazil has been in many ways a reference in sustainability practices applied to corn and soybean crops. As a result, farmers experience yield gains, reduce reliance on conventional inputs or practices, and help sustain a healthy growth rate of national production.

The third overall factor sustaining production growth in Brazil is the development of innovative financial instruments to borrow operating capital. These instruments were devised out of farmers’ necessity instead of preference. The operating costs of a representative corn and soybean farm in Brazil are considerably higher than those of a Midwest farm. Our estimations suggest that one acre of soybeans grown in Brazil requires five times the operating costs that an average Midwest farm requires. Similarly, the operations of one acre of corn in Brazil cost twice as much as the operations of one acre of corn in a typical Ohio farm. Because the cost of establishing a soybean or corn crop is budget constraining for most growers in Brazil, several financial instruments were devised and continue to evolve to ease the constraint. Eventual challenges associated with spikes in ag-input prices can be managed using the available financial tools. (As long as grain prices at harvest lead to a positive bottom-line result).

We want to call attention to two private financing instruments commonly used in Brazil: the CPR (Rural Product Exchange Title) and the CRA (Certificate of agribusiness receivables). Together these instruments raised $5.1 billion in 2019. Farmers may also access working capital at reduced interest rates through season plans (Plano Safra, in Portuguese) put together by the federal government every season. In 2019 the government made approximately $43 billion available to farmers in need of capital to cover establishment costs, including seed, fertilizer, and chemicals.

A quick discussion about the two private funding instruments is in order. The CPR refers to an agreement between a farmer and a financial institution. The agreement is frequently signed a couple of months before planting, and the expected crop is used as the guarantee. Farmers may choose to use the crop to liquidate the title at the end of the season. The CRA is a type of income security issued by a non-financial institution, often a multinational ag-input firm or a commodity trader. The security is then transacted with a financial institution that agrees on anticipating capital to the firm or trader. In possession of working capital, the ag-input firm or trader signs agreements with growers in exchange for the money.

This latter instrument has gained popularity in Brazil for two key reasons. First, farmers show preferences for borrowing capital from trading partners instead of banks. Second, ag-input firms and traders are in a position that allows scale gains before approaching a financial institution for the working capital. In that sense, they tend to obtain the capital at reduced interest rates, which are passed to growers with little to no additional charges. Ag input firms and traders are primarily interested in selling inputs or originating grain rather than profit via financial transactions.

The point to be made is that Brazilian grain growers count on two resilience factors. The first derives from technical decisions at the farm field. Sustainable practices have paid off as they tend to reduce reliance on conventional ag inputs, favor nutrient cycling, and enhance tolerance to abiotic stresses such as droughts. The second factor refers to financial tools available to help farmers cope with expensive operating costs. From the farm financial management perspective, eventual price increases in fertilizers and chemicals can be managed with appropriate financial instruments, especially when the commodities show signs of stable prices at harvest. Other than that, Brazilian farmers must work their fields and hope for the projections to hold and for abiotic stresses to be easy on the crops. The bottom line shall be safe then.

 

(This article was previously published in the Ohio’s Country Journal on December 13, 2021).

 

FARM OFFICE LIVE FALL and WINTER EDITION!

by: Barry Ward, David Marrison, Peggy Hall, Dianne Shoemaker, Julie Strawser – Ohio State University Extension

“Farm Office Live” returns virtually this fall and winter as an opportunity for you to get the latest outlook and updates on ag law, farm management, ag economics, farm business analysis and other related issues from faculty and educators with the College of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.

Each Farm Office Live will include presentations on select ag law and farm management topics from our experts. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and interact with presenters via webinar features. Viewers can attend “Farm Office Live” online each month on Wednesday evening or Friday morning, or can catch a recording of each program. The full slate of offerings for this fall and winter:

November 17th 7:00 – 8:30pm

November 19th 10am – 11:30am

December 15th 7:00 – 8:30pm

December 17th 10:00 – 11:30am

January 19th 7:00 – 8:30 pm

January 21st 10:00 – 11:30 am

February 16th 7:00 – 8:30 pm

February 18th 10:00 – 11:30 am

March 16th 7:00 – 8:30 pm

March 18th 10:00 – 11:30 am

April 20th 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Topics to be addressed over the next few months include:

Legal trends for 2021

Legislative updates

Tax Issues That May Impact Farm Businesses

Crop Input Costs and Profit Margins

Cropland Values and Cash Rents

Interest Rates

Farm business management and analysis updates

Farm succession & estate planning updates

Who’s on the Farm Office Team?  Our team features OSU experts ready to help you manage your farm office:

Peggy Kirk Hall — agricultural law

Dianne Shoemaker — farm business analysis and dairy production

David Marrison — farm management

Barry Ward — agricultural economics and tax

Julie Strawser – marketing, webinar management and support, administrative support

Register at:  https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive

We look forward to you joining us this fall and winter!

Farm Office Live to Analyze USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers Initiative

By Barry Ward, David Marrison, Peggy Hall, Dianne Shoemaker and Julie Strawser – Ohio State University Extension

April’s “Farm Office Live” will focus on details of the USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers” initiative announced on March 24, 2021. Changes were made in effort to reach a greater share of farming operations and improve USDA pandemic assistance.

During the webinar, we will be sharing details about the pandemic initiative and discussing some of the changes made to the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP).  Our Farm Office Team will also provide a legislative update and discuss changes to the Paycheck Protection Program and Employee Retention Credits. They will also be on hand to answer your questions and address any related issues.

Two live sessions will be offered on Wednesday, April 7, from 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. and again on Friday, April 9, from 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. A replay will be available on the Farm Office website if you cannot attend the live event.

Farm Office Live is a webinar series addressing the latest outlook and updates on ag law, farm management, ag economics, farm business analysis and other related issues. It is presented by the faculty and educators with the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.

To register or view past recordings, visit https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive.

For more information or to submit a topic for discussion, email Julie Strawser at strawser.35@osu.edu or call the Farm Office at 614-292-2433.

Farm Office Live Continues!

by: Barry Ward, David Marrison, Peggy Hall, Dianne Shoemaker – Ohio State University Extension

“Farm Office Live” continues this winter as an opportunity for you to get the latest outlook and updates on ag law, farm management, ag economics, farm business analysis and other related issues from faculty and educators with the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.

Each Farm Office Live begins with presentations on select ag law and farm management topics from our specialists followed by open discussions and a Q&A session. Viewers can attend “Farm Office Live” online each month on Wednesday evening or Friday morning, or can catch a recording of each program.

The full slate of offerings remaining for this winter are:

  • March 10th 7:00 – 8:30 pm
  • March 12th 10:00 – 11:30 am
  • April 7th 7:00 – 8:30 pm
  • April 9th 10:00 – 11:30 am

Topics to be addressed in March include:

  • Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP)
  • Proposed Stimulus Legislation
  • General Legislative Update
  • Ohio Farm Business Analysis – A Look at Crops
  • Crop Budget & Rental Rates

To register or view past recordings, visit https://go.osu.edu/farmofficelive

For more information or to submit a topic for discussion, email Julie Strawser at strawser.35@osu.edu or call the farm office at 614-292-2433. We look forward to you joining us!