Ohio State University (OSU) Extension’s Ohio Women in Agriculture Program announces opportunities to Learn, Grow, Connect, Inspire and Empower at the 2022 Farm Science Review!

Some of the best conversations and discussions have occurred around the family kitchen table. Grab a cup of your favorite beverage, lunch, or snack and join us from our kitchen table or yours to engage in conversations in-person or “virtually” on September 20, 21, and 22, 2022 for “Kitchen Table Conversations” hosted by the Ohio Women in Agriculture of Ohio State University Extension.

These sessions are offered during the Farm Science Review daily from 11:30 AM-12:30 PM. In-person sessions will be located on the north side of the Firebaugh Building at 384 Friday Avenue at our kitchen table. ZOOM session registration is required to participate. Register @ https://go.osu.edu/2022fsrkitchentableconversation

Programs will focus on key topics related to health, marketing, finance, legal, and production for women in agriculture.  Each topic will feature a leading expert and moderators to generate dialogue and empower discussion among participants.  A list of daily topics and leaders is provided below.

TUESDAY

When Death Happens- Managing the Farm Without Your Business Partner

Death can change everything, especially your ability to manage the farm without your business partner.  How can you better prepare to manage your farm business without your spouse or sibling?  Learn some strategies that can help you plan for the challenge of managing a farm alone.

SPEAKER: David Marrison, OSU Extension Educator, Coshocton County

WEDNESDAY

Female Farmer Financing Options: Opportunities with USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Loans

Come participate in this kitchen table conversation on how you can find unique farmland financing options for females, veterans, and minority farmers. Learn a little bit more about the requirements, normal rates, and roles.

SPEAKER: Eric Richer, OSU Extension Educator, Fulton County

THURSDAY

The Devil is in the Details: Communication and Record Keeping for Improving Farm Management

Family farms are only as good as their communication.  A record-keeping system is a valuable form of communication when the level of detail fits the needs of the farm decision-makers.  Useful record keeping can move a farm management team beyond the basic tax return to exploring problem-solving and strengthening the family farm business.

SPEAKER: Bruce Clevenger, OSU Extension Educator, Defiance County

Your host for the event will be Extension Professionals of the OSU Extension Ohio Women in Agriculture Team. Visit our display inside the Firebaugh Building for additional women in agriculture opportunities.

For more information: Gigi Neal, neal.331@osu.edu, 513-732-7070 or Heather Neikirk, neikirk.2@osu.edu, 234-348-6145

Blog site: u.osu.edu/ohwomeninag

 

Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents 2021-22

by: Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, Director, OSU Income Tax Schools, OSU Extension, Agriculture & Natural Resources

High crop prices and COVID era legislative ad-hoc government payments coupled with lower interest rates (among other factors) over the last 2 and half years have given strength to farmland markets. Higher input costs over the last year and half together with rising interest rates have offset some of this strength but farmland values continue to increase. Many of these same factors have given strength to the farmland rental markets which have also seen increases this last year and will likely see additional increases in 2022.

According to the Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents Survey, cropland values in western Ohio are expected to increase in 2022 by 8.0 to 11.3 percent depending on the region and land class. This is on top of increases from 2020 to 2021 of 7.2 to 26.6 percent depending on region and productivity class.

Cash rents are expected to increase from 5.8 to 6.8 percent depending on the region and land class. This is on top of rental increases of 1.5 to 7.7 percent from 2020 to 2021.

Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rent

Ohio cropland varies significantly in its production capabilities and, consequently, cropland values and cash rents vary widely throughout the state. Generally, western Ohio cropland values and cash rents differ from much of southern and eastern Ohio cropland values and cash rents. The primary factors affecting these values and rents are land productivity and potential crop return, and the variability of those crop returns. Soils, fertility and drainage/irrigation capabilities are primary factors that most influence land productivity, crop return and variability of those crop returns.

Other factors impacting land values and cash rents may include field size and shape, field accessibility, market access, local market prices, field perimeter characteristics and potential for wildlife damage, buildings and grain storage, previous tillage system and crops, tolerant/resistant weed populations, USDA Program Yields, population density, and competition for the cropland in a region. Factors specific to cash rental rates may include services provided by the operator and specific conditions of the lease. This fact sheet summarizes data collected for western Ohio cropland values and cash rents.

Study Results 

The Western Ohio Cropland Values and Cash Rents study was conducted from January through April in 2022. The opinion-based study surveyed professionals with a knowledge of Ohio’s cropland values and rental rates. Professionals surveyed were rural appraisers, agricultural lenders, professional farm managers, ag business professionals, OSU Extension educators, farmers, landowners, and Farm Service Agency personnel.

Respondents were asked to group their estimates based on three land quality classes: average, top, and poor. Within each land-quality class, respondents were asked to estimate average corn and soybean yields for a five-year period based on typical farming practices. Survey respondents were also asked to estimate current bare cropland values and cash rents negotiated in the current or recent year for each land-quality class. Survey results are summarized for western Ohio with regional summaries (subsets of western Ohio) for northwest Ohio and southwest Ohio.

The complete survey summary can be accessed and downloaded at our Farm Office page:

https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-management-tools/farm-management-publications/cash-rents

 

Ohio Farm Custom Rates 2022

By: Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, OSU Extension, Agriculture and Natural Resources; John Barker, Extension Educator Agriculture/Amos Program, Ohio State University Extension Knox County and Eric Richer, Extension Educator Agriculture & Natural Resources, Ohio State University Extension Fulton County

Farming is a complex business and many Ohio farmers utilize outside assistance for specific farm-related work. This option is appealing for tasks requiring specialized equipment or technical expertise. Often, having someone else with specialized tools perform tasks is more cost effective and saves time. Farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply, “custom work”. A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider.

Ohio Farm Custom Rates

The “Ohio Farm Custom Rates 2022” publication reports custom rates based on a statewide survey of 223 farmers, custom operators, farm managers, and landowners conducted in 2022. These rates, except where noted, include the implement and tractor if required, all variable machinery costs such as fuel, oil, lube, twine, etc., and labor for the operation.

Some custom rates published in this study vary widely, possibly influenced by:

  • Type or size of equipment used (e.g. 20-shank chisel plow versus a 9-shank)
  • Size and shape of fields,
  • Condition of the crop (for harvesting operations)
  • Skill level of labor
  • Amount of labor needed in relation to the equipment capabilities
  • Cost margin differences for full-time custom operators compared to farmers supplementing current income

Some custom rates reflect discounted rates as the parties involved have family or community relationships, Discounted rates may also occur when the custom work provider is attempting to strengthen a relationship to help secure the custom farmed land in a future purchase, cash rental or other rental agreement. Some providers charge differently because they are simply attempting to spread their fixed costs over more acreage to decrease fixed costs per acre and are willing to forgo complete cost recovery.

New this year, the number of responses for each operation has been added to the data presented. In cases where there were too few responses to statistically analyze, summary statistics are not presented.

Charges may be added if the custom provider considers a job abnormal such as distance from the operator’s base location, difficulty of terrain, amount of product or labor involved with the operation, or other special requirements of the custom work customer.

The data from this survey are intended to show a representative farming industry cost for specified machines and operations in Ohio. As a custom farm work provider, the average rates reported in this publication may not cover your total costs for performing the custom service. As a customer, you may not be able to hire a custom service for the average rate published in this factsheet.

It is recommended that you calculate your own costs carefully before determining the custom rate to charge or pay. It may be helpful to compare the custom rates reported in this fact sheet with machinery costs calculated by economic engineering models available online. The following resources are available to help you calculate and consider the total costs of performing a given machinery operation.

Farm Machinery Cost Estimates, available by searching University of Minnesota.

Illinois Farm Management Handbook, available by searching University of Illinois farmdoc.

Estimating Farm Machinery Costs, available by searching Iowa State University agriculture decision maker and machinery management.

Fuel price changes may cause some uncertainty in setting a custom rate. Significant volatility in diesel price over the last several months has caused some concern for custom rate providers that seek to cover all or most of the costs associated with custom farm operations. The approximate price of diesel fuel during the survey period ranged from $4.50 – $5.25 per gallon for off-road (farm) usage. As a custom farm work provider, if you feel that your rate doesn’t capture your full costs due to fuel price increases you might consider a custom rate increase or fuel surcharge based on the increase in fuel costs.

For example, let’s assume the rate you planned to charge for a chisel plow operation was based on $4.50 per gallon diesel costs and the current on-farm diesel price is $5.50 per gallon. This is a $1 per gallon increase. The chisel plow operation uses 1.15 gallons of fuel per acre so the added fuel surcharge could be set at $1.15 per acre (1.15 gallons x $1 gallon).

The complete “Ohio Farm Custom Rates 2022” publication is available online at the Farm Office website:

https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-management/custom-rates-and-machinery-costs

 

 

 

Farm Service Agency Loans Available for Beginning Farmers

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR in Tuscarawas County

Building and managing a successful farm is a significant financial investment and can be especially challenging for those just beginning, especially those unable to obtain financing through commercial lenders.  The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) makes and guarantees loans to beginning farmers.

Each year money is allocated to FSA for farm ownership and farm operating loans for beginning farmers.  These loan programs are important as beginning farmers have historically experienced more difficulty obtaining financial assistance.

What is a Beginning Farmer?

A beginning farmer is an individual or entity who:

  • Has not operated a farm for more than 10 years
  • Substantially participates in the operation
  • For farm ownership loans, the applicant cannot own a farm greater than 30 percent of the average size farm in the county, at the time of application
  • If the applicant is an entity, all members must be related by blood or marriage, and all members must be eligible beginning farmers

Additionally, beginning farmers must meet the loan eligibility requirements for the program.

Maximum Loan Amounts

The Farm Service Agency makes available a variety of loans, each with a different maximum loan amount.  The loan types and maximum allowable amounts are provided below:

  • Direct farm ownership: $600,000
  • Direct operating loan: $400,000
  • Microloan: $50,000 each for operating and farm ownership
  • Guaranteed farm ownership or operating loan: $1,825,000
  • EZ Guarantee: $100,000 ($50,000 if the lender is a micro lender)

Down Payment Program

FSA has a special loan program to assist beginning farmers purchase a farm.  Retiring farmers may use this program to transfer their land to future generations.  Requirements are listed here:

  • Cash down payment of at least 5% of the purchase price
  • Loan amount limited to 45% of the least of:
    • Purchase price of the farm
    • Appraised value of the farm or
  • $ 667,000 ($300,150) maximum
  • 20 year loan term
  • Interest rate is 4% below the direct farm ownership rate, but no lower than 1.5%

The remaining balance may be obtained from a commercial lender or private party.  FSA can guarantee up to 95% of the loan if financing is obtained from a commercial lender.  Participating lenders do not have to pay a loan guarantee fee.

If financing is secured from participating lenders, the amortization period must be at least 30 years and cannot have a balloon payment due within the first 20 years of the loan.

Additional Options to Access Capital

Beginning farmers may be interested in participating in a joint financing arrangement.  FSA will lend up to 50% of the amount financed and another lender provides the remaining percentage.  These funds can be used for any authorized farm ownership purpose.  The interest rate is two percent less than the direct ownership rate but not lower than 2.5%.  The term of the loan will not exceed 40 years or the useful life of the security.

Land Contract Guarantees

FSA does provide financial guarantees for land sales to beginning farmers.  The seller may request either of the following:

  • Prompt Payment Guarantee: A guarantee up to the amount of three amortized annual installments plus the cost of any related real estate taxes and insurance.
  • Standard Guarantee: A guarantee of 90% of the outstanding principal balance under the land contract.

The farm purchase price cannot exceed $500,000 or the market value of the property.  The buyer is required to provide a minimum down payment of 5% of the purchase price of the farm.  The interest rate is fixed at a rate not to exceed the direct farm ownership loan interest rate in effect at the time the guarantee is issued, plus three percentage points.  The guarantee period is 10 years.  Contract payments must be amortized a minimum of 20 years.

How to Apply

Direct loans are available through your local Farm Service Agency office.  For guaranteed loans, you must apply with a commercial lender who participated in the Guaranteed Loan Program.  Your local FSA office can provide a list of participating institutions.

Locating Your FSA Office

If you are unsure which FSA office services your county, please visit: https://offices.sc.egov.usda.gov/locator/app?state=oh&agency=fsa

Ohio Farm Custom Rate Survey 2022 Responses – Last Call

by: Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, OSU Extension, Agriculture & Natural Resources

The Ohio Farm Custom Rates Survey 2022 data collection has launched. The online survey for 2022 is available at: https://go.osu.edu/ohiofarmcustomratesurvey2022

If you perform custom farm work or pay for these services, we kindly ask you to complete the Ohio Farm Custom Rate Survey for 2022.

A large number of Ohio farmers hire machinery operations and other farm related work to be completed by others. This is often due to lack of proper equipment, lack of time or lack of expertise for a particular operation.  Many farm business owners do not own equipment for every possible job that they may encounter in the course of operating a farm and may, instead of purchasing the equipment needed, seek out someone with the proper tools necessary to complete the job. This farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply “custom work”. A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider.

Custom farming providers and customers often negotiate an agreeable custom farming machinery rate by utilizing Extension surveys results as a starting point. Ohio State University Extension collects surveys and publishes survey results from the Ohio Farm Custom Survey every other year. Past survey summaries can be found at: https://farmoffice.osu.edu/farm-mgt-tools/custom-rates-and-machinery-costs

This year we are updating our published custom farm rates for Ohio.

We kindly request your assistance in securing up-to-date information about farm custom work rates, machinery and building rental rates and hired labor costs in Ohio.

This year we have an online survey set up that anyone can access. We would ask that you respond even if you know only a few rates.  We want information on actual rates, either what you paid to hire custom work or what you charged if you perform custom work. Custom Rates should include all ownership costs of implement & tractor (if needed), operator labor, fuel and lube. If fuel is not included in your custom rate charge there is a place on the survey to indicate this.

 You may access the survey at: https://go.osu.edu/ohiofarmcustomratesurvey2022

If you prefer a document that you can print out and fill out by hand to return, email Barry Ward at ward.8@osu.edu

The deadline to complete the survey is March 31, 2022.

 

 

 

 

USDA Report: Small Family Farms Produce Majority of Poultry and Eggs, and Hay

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR in Tuscarawas County &  Tony Nye, Extension Educator, ANR in Clinton County

The United States Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service (USDA ERS), in their December 2021 Charts of Note, examined the value of production of seven commodities.  The purpose of the analysis was to determine the percentage of each by type (family and non-family farms) and size of operation.

The USDA ERS defines family farms as those where the principal operator and those associated with the principal operator own most of the business.  USDA ERS defines nonfamily farms as those where the principal operator and those related to the principal operator do not own a majority of the business.

USDA ERS classifies family farms by size, according to gross cash farm income (GCFI):

  • Small family farms – GCFI less than $350,000
  • Midsize family farms – between $350,000 and $999,999 in GCFI
  • Large-scale family farms – $1 million or more in GCFI

The table below summarizes the value of production by type and size of operation.  Small family farms produced the majority of hay (59%) and poultry and eggs (49%) in 2020.  Small family farms also accounted for just over one-quarter of beef production.

 

Ohio State University Extension works with Small Farm Producers throughout Ohio.

Since 2005, Ohio State has been addressing producer needs for small farm production. Our two main efforts include an eight-week Small Farm College course and the Small Farm Conference.

The Mission of OSU Extension Small Farm Programs:

To provide a greater understanding of production practices, economics of land use choices, assessment of personal and natural resources, marketing alternatives, and the identification of sources of assistance for new and small farms in Ohio.

Small Farm Program Objectives:

  • To improve the economic development of small farms in Ohio.
  • To help small farm landowners and families diversify their opportunities into successful new enterprises and new markets.
  • To improve agricultural literacy among small farm landowners not actively involved in agricultural production.

Small Farm Conference

‘Sowing Seeds for Success’  –  the 2022 Small Farm Conference is scheduled for March 12th from 8:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the Mansfield OSU Campus in Ovalwood Hall.  The campus is just minutes from I-71 and US Rt 30.

This conference is for small farm owners who want to learn more about how to make their farms work better for them or expand their operations. This conference is also useful for those new to agriculture who are looking for ways to utilize acreage. Landowners can attend workshops and presentations on these topics:

    • Horticulture
    • Produce Production
    • Natural Resources
    • Livestock
    • Specialty Crops
    • Farm Management
    • Marketing
    • Miscellaneous Topics

This conference is designed to help participants learn tips and techniques for diversifying their opportunities into successful new enterprises and markets. Combined with a trade show, participants learn new ways to improve economic growth and development on their farms.

Cost is $75.00 per person. Please visit: https://morrow.osu.edu/program-areas/agriculture-and-natural-resources/small-farm-conference  for conference and registration details or call OSU Extension Morrow County 419-947-1070.

The New and Small Farm College

The New and Small Farm College is a seven-week program that introduces new and seasoned farmers to a wide variety of topics. The program teaches participants how to set goals, plan, budget, how to manage financial and farm records, and where to find resources if they choose to start a small farming operation. Other subjects include legal issues, farm insurance and marketing.

Coming in August 2022, this program will be available.  Watch this website for updates on times and locations: https://u.osu.edu/gofarmohio/programs/new-and-small-farm-college/

The cost to attend is $125 and includes a resource binder, meals, all programs including Farm Science Review admission, and a soil test. Additional family members can register for $100 per person (excludes binder).

 

 

 

OSU Extension to Host 2022 East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension will host the 7th Annual East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference. The conference is planned for Friday, March 25 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at Ohio FFA Camp Muskingum, 3266 Dyewood Road SW, Carrollton, OH 44615. All women and young women (high school age) who are interested, involved in, or want to become involved with food, agricultural, or natural resources production or small business are encouraged to attend.

East Ohio Women in Ag Conference 2022 Flyer

The conference program features a networking fair and sixteen breakout sessions presented by OSU Extension educators, producers, and partner agencies. Sessions this year are focused around four themes: Natural Resources, Plants & Animals, Home & Family, and Special Interest (includes break-out with Ohio FFA State Officers). The conference keynote will be led by Bridget Britton, OSU Extension Behavioral Health Field Specialist. She and her team will lead participants through “Stoic or Stressed? Talking through difficult topics in a safe space.”

Registered participants, community organizations, or businesses interested in sponsorship can contact 740-461-6136.

Interested individuals can register for the conference online at go.osu.edu/eowia2022. Cost of the conference is $55 for adult participants and $30 for students.  Conference fee includes conference participation, breakfast, lunch, and conference handouts. Deadline for registration is Friday, March 11. For additional information, please contact Emily Marrison, OSU Extension Coshocton County at 740-622-2265.

Stay connected with the Ohio Women in Agriculture Learning Network on Facebook @OHwomeninag or subscribe to the Ohio Women in Agriculture blogsite at u.osu.edu/ohwomeninag .

 

Soybean Farmers Invited to Participate in Survey

by: Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, ANR, Tuscarawas County & David Marrison, Extension Educator, ANR, Coshocton County

Dr. Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois, and Dr. Carl Zulauf, Emeritus Professor, The Ohio State University, are conducting an online survey of soybean growers in nine soybean producing states, including Ohio. The nine states represent 75% of U.S. soybean production.

The researchers intend to measure the impact of each communication channel – mass media, social media, and interpersonal meetings – on farmers’ decision-making to adopt a new digital technology. This survey is focused on soybean producers in these states: Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Indiana, Nebraska, Missouri, Ohio, South Dakota, and North Dakota. The results will support new research and contribute in a practical way to increase knowledge about the most efficient communication channels for the dissemination of digital agriculture technologies.

The survey takes approximately five minutes to complete, and all data will be kept confidential.  If interested, you can provide your email address to receive a copy of the final survey results.

If you are interested in participating in this survey, please click here: https://go.illinois.edu/farmdocsurvey

 

Ohio Farm Custom Rate Survey 2022 Responses Requested

by: Barry Ward, Leader, Production Business Management, OSU Extension, Agriculture & Natural Resources

 The Ohio Farm Custom Rates Survey data collection has launched once again. The online survey for 2022 is available at: https://go.osu.edu/ohiofarmcustomratesurvey2022

A large number of Ohio farmers hire machinery operations and other farm related work to be completed by others. This is often due to lack of proper equipment, lack of time or lack of expertise for a particular operation.  Many farm business owners do not own equipment for every possible job that they may encounter in the course of operating a farm and may, instead of purchasing the equipment needed, seek out someone with the proper tools necessary to complete the job. This farm work completed by others is often referred to as “custom farm work” or more simply “custom work”. A “custom rate” is the amount agreed upon by both parties to be paid by the custom work customer to the custom work provider.

Custom farming providers and customers often negotiate an agreeable custom farming machinery rate by utilizing Extension surveys results as a starting point. Ohio State University Extension collects surveys and publishes survey results from the Ohio Farm Custom Survey every other year. This year we are updating our published custom farm rates for Ohio.

We kindly request your assistance in securing up-to-date information about farm custom work rates, machinery and building rental rates and hired labor costs in Ohio.

This year we have an online survey set up that anyone can access. We would ask that you respond even if you know only a few rates.  We want information on actual rates, either what you paid to hire custom work or what you charged if you perform custom work. Custom Rates should include all ownership costs of implement & tractor (if needed), operator labor, fuel and lube. If fuel is not included in your custom rate charge there is a place on the survey to indicate this.

 You may access the survey at: https://go.osu.edu/ohiofarmcustomratesurvey2022

If you prefer a document that you can print out and fill out by hand to return, email Barry Ward at ward.8@osu.edu

 

The deadline to complete the survey is March 31, 2022.

 

 

 

 

2022 Agricultural Outlook and Policy Meetings Set to Kickoff

by: Mike Estadt, OSU Extension, estadt.3@osu.edu

The Ohio State University Extension is pleased to announce the Regional Ag Outlook and Policy Meetings for 2022.  Meetings will be held around the state beginning the last of January and ending in March.

Speakers will address a myriad of topics of agriculture interest  here in Ohio as well as across the Corn Belt.  Programs will include presentations on Grain Market Outlook, Ag Law Updates, Dairy Industry 2022, Ohio’s Changing Climate, Farm Policy and Farm Bill, SB 52: Utility Solar Legislative, Farm Real Estate and Cash Rent Trends, Ag Input Price Projections and Federal Tax Updates.

New to this year’s program  is the statewide sponsorship and support of the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

“We are proud to partner with Ohio State University  Extension educators across the state to support this year’s agronomy, outlook and grower meetings.  We value this partnership and look forward to supporting programs that bring value to our members farm businesses”, according to Brad Moffitt, Director of Membership and Market Development for the Ohio Corn and Wheat Growers Association.

The following table lists the scheduled Outlook programs with contact information to register.

 

Hosts: Union/Madison/Champaign

DATE: January 28th

Time: 8:30 a.m.

Place: Der Dutchman Restaurant, 445 S. Jefferson Ave, Plain City, Ohio  43064

Speakers:

Barry Ward, Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Ben Brown, Grain Marketing Outlook

Robert Moore, Farm Transition and Taxes

Contact  Amanda Douridas (douridas.1@osu.edu)

Registration: Go.osu.edu/PlainCityOutlook

 

Host: Defiance County

Date: January 31, 2022

Time: 6:00-9:00 p.m.

Place: Jewell Community Center, 7900 Independence Road, Defiance, OH  43512

Speakers:

Barry Ward, Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Matt Roberts, Grain Marketing Outlook

 

Contact: Bruce Clevenger (Clevenger.1@osu.edu)

Registration:  https://defiance.osu.edu/

Host: Wayne County

Date: January 13, 2022

Place: Buckeye Ag Museum, 877 West Old Lincoln Way,  Wooster, OH   44691

Time: 8:00 a.m-12:00

Speakers:

Barry Ward, Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall,  Ag Law Update

Aaron Wilson, Ohio’s Changing Climate

Dianne Shoemaker, Dairy Industry 2022

 

Contact: Haley Zynda (zynda.7@osu.edu)

Host: Clinton County

Date January 14, 2022

Time: 7:00 a.m. Breakfast  7:30 a.m. Program

Place: OSU Extension Office, 111 S. Nelson Ave. Wilmington, Ohio  45177

Speakers:

Barry Ward Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall, Ag Law Update

Aaron Wilson, Ohio’s Changing Climate

Eric Romich, SB 52 Solar Farm Legislation

Carl Zulauf,  Farm Bill 2023

Contact:  Tony Nye (Nye.1@osu.edu)

Host: Crawford County

Date: February 1, 2022

Place: Wayside Chapel Community Center, 2341 Kersetter Rd., Bucyrus, OH 44820

Time: 5:00 p.m.

Speakers:

Peggy Hall Ag Law Update

Carl Zulauf Farm Bill 2023

Matt Roberts, Grain Marketing Outlook

Aaron Wilson  Ohio’s Changing Climate

 

Contact: Jason Hartschuh (hartschuh.11@osu.edu)

Host: Pickaway County

Date  Feb 2, 2022

Place: Emmett Chapel 318 Tarlton Rd, Circleville, Ohio 43113

Time: 8:00 a.m.

Speakers:

Barry Ward Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Matt Roberts,  Grain Marketing Outlook

Carl Zulauf,  Farm Bill 2023

 

Contact: Mike Estadt (estadt.3@osu.edu)

Host: Muskingum County

Date: February 14, 2022

Place: Muskingum County Convention Center, 205 N. 5th St. Zanesville, Ohio 43701

Time: 9:00 a.m.

Speakers:

Barry Ward  Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall,  Ag Law Update

Matt Roberts,  Grain Marketing Outlook

Carl Zulauf,  Farm Bill 2023

Contact: Clifton Martin (martin.2242@osu.edu)

Host:  Darke County

Date: March 25, 2022

Place: Romers Catering,118 E Main St, Greenville, OH 45331     

Time  10:00-2:00 p.m.

Speakers:

Barry Ward,  Farm Inputs, Rent and Real Estate

Peggy Hall Ag Law Update

Aaron Wilson  Ohio’s Changing Climate

Contact Taylor Dill (Dill.138@osu.edu)