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Module 5: Web-Enhanced Listening and Viewing Strategies

This week was all about the ways in which we take notes and listen during class. Taking notes is incredibly important in college because you are most likely going to have quizzes and exams that cover the class material. With note-taking, it’s best to K.I.S.S. (Keep it simple, stupid) and to work smarter and not harder, since you are on a collegiate level, professors are prone to go through the material a bit faster. In our list of references I found a great tool called Crash Course, it’s a Youtube channel where it’s all things academia in a more interesting and entertaining way. I have put into practice reviewing/studying material from a course (i.e. Organic chemistry) and then going to view the Crash Course videos that correspond. Doing this allows me to fill in any gaps that I missed while studying and ultimately helps me understand the bigger picture while refreshing me of material I just reviewed. Building the correct study regimen for you is most effective in your first year because it will carry on with you throughout your time here. There’s a lot of resources that are readily available to help you ace your next exam, you just have to search around and figure out what’s best for you and your learning behaviors. From what I have learned from this module, it’s best to stay as organized as possible and review material from a class after it’s over, that way you are already giving yourself a headstart when it’s time to study for a quiz/exam.

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.youtube.com/user/crashcourse/playlists

Module 4: Web-Enhanced Reading and Study Strategies

This module was all about building up resources that can help us read online and retain information with our classes. Online study tools will be your best friend when you first get to college so it’s important to look around for the one that best suits your learning styles/preferences. I am a big fan of mnemonics and have been for a while, even before I came to college. I even was able to learn about a couple more ways I can use mnemonics after reading “9 Types of Mnemonics to Improve Your Memory”. My favorite strategy to use is letters and word mnemonics, it allows me to make up my own acronyms like “LCM” to remember the phrase “least common multiple”. But I was surprised to see the strategy was #7 Loci Mnemonic Strategy. This will actually be a great method for incoming students when learning about the locations of their classrooms and trying to navigate their way around OSU’s ginormous campus. Taking mental “notes” when entering a new building for the class is important because it allows you to, over time, of course, become familiar with your location and even helps out others who also might be lost! The lessons you learn in class are sometimes going to be applicable outside of the classroom, so always keep that in mind!

 

Source: https://www.verywellhealth.com/memory-tip-1-keyword-mnemonics-98466

Module 3: Efficiency in the Digital Age

For this week’s lessons, we talked all about procrastination and time management. This is one of the most important things that you will put into fruition from your first day of school. Especially if you are someone who has other non-educational responsibilities and has to juggle academics and other important things. A great way to do this is to “Work Smarter, Not Harder”, I also read the article titled “Work Smarter, Not Harder: 21 Time Management Tips to Hack Productivity” from the list of our modules and learned a couple of additional tips and tricks. Tip #3, is one of the most underrated but important tips, that almost seem contradictory. Getting at least 7-8 hours of sleep is actually a great way to utilize your upcoming day because you are rest, refreshed, and ready to learn and take on the day. I have been taught this lesson the hard way, and have started recently taking my sleep a lot more seriously by setting an earlier bedtime and setting a morning alarm.  REMEMBER! Bingers, all-nighters, and parties will always be here, you are here for a degree and have to get used to balancing your fun and academics. College is about finding a balance and knowing when it’s time to have fun versus when it’s time to sit down and figure out your academic/serious priorities.

Source: https://www.creativitypost.com/create/work_smarter_not_harder_21_time_management_tips_to_hack_productivity

Module 2: Communicating and Collaborating on the Web

This week we learned a lot about communication especially when it comes to work in virtual environments. Due to COVID-19 it’s more important than ever for there to be proper ways to communicate with others because pre-COVID, we were able to see people in person which allowed us to observe their body language and hear their tone when speaking. I found Slide 7 about emails and “Netiquette” to be incredibly important because emails are forever and can leave last impressions if done incorrectly. In the 18 Etiquette Tips for Emailing Your Professor, I realized that my OSU email address is appropriate but my personal email is not, which is sometimes the email I put down for jobs. Email accounts are free and very easy to create, so make sure to have an email separate for all your professional and academic endeavors. Email etiquette is incredibly useful because it’s able to span across multiple avenues in your life as a student. You’ll use it not only to talk to professors but bosses, coworkers, TA’s, and more. Finding out who to email in some situations can be tricky, which is why it’s important to do a little research before you begin sending emails out to people who may not be able to help you with your issues/problems/concerns. 

 

Source: https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/professors-guide/2010/09/30/18-etiquette-tips-for-e-mailing-your-professor