Posts

U of Cambridge Interfaith Week webinar

As part of University of Cambridge’s 13th World Interfaith Harmony Week programming, we are holding a webinar Language Learning in/as Religious Education on February 2, at 15:45 GMT. I will join Adel Mozammel (Darul Ihsan School), Anastasia Badder (Cambridge U), Jo-Ann Myers (Leo Baeck Institute), and Youmna Helmy (Cambridge U) to explore how religious communities draw on language as a semiotic resource aimed at specific goals, and how different methodologies can reveal aspects of the aims, processes, factors, and outcomes of sacred language learning and use. The event is free, just register in advance to get the Zoom link.

6th FLRT Symposium

FLRT held its 6th Graduate Student Symposium for Foreign Language Research and Teaching January 20th. In addition to 13 great papers by students, keynote speaker Professor Ester de Jong (University of Colorado Denver) gave a talk on multilingualism and language teacher preparation.

Supporting Black Children’s Language, Literacy, and Joy

Dr. Monique Mills and I the organizers of Supporting Black Children on Their Paths to Greatness: Language, Literacy, and Joy. This is a series of virtual mini-convenings that bring together a small group of people to create a collaborative space for sharing strategies that work well in advancing research, educational practice, advocacy, and dialogue and collaboration between researchers and practitioners. Each convening includes one or more talks by members of our emerging community of practice, as well as opportunities to discuss and to get to know one another. In 2022-2023, we meet roughly once a month, and each convening has a theme.

ASHA webinar with Monique Mills

Dr. Monique Mills and I will present a live webinar Perceptions of Narrative Quality in School-Age African American English (AAE) Speakers on December 22. The audience is school-based Speech-Language pathologists who work with African American children. We will explore variation in narrative practices common within AAE-speaking communities and discuss widely held beliefs about narrative language and its variation, how these beliefs affect clinical practice, and insights from research into how SLPs can expand our narrative language assessment practices to be more inclusive of culturally based narrative variation.

Sessions at AAA 2022 in Seattle

I am participating in 2 sessions at the 2022 Meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Seattle. The panel ‘Using Anthropology Of Language And Literacy To Address Equity In Unsettling Times’ brings together educational anthropologists who draw on anthropological theory and methods to examine the teaching and learning of language and literacy, drawing on theoretical frameworks that challenge dominant understandings. The round table ‘Refugee Education Across The Life Span In Unsettling Times’ showcases research on/with the language and literacy dimensions of the refugee experience.

Seminar for U of Cambridge UK Inter Faith Week

I will be part of a virtual seminar ‘Language Learning in/as Education’, hosted by the University of Cambridge as part of the upcoming UK Inter Faith Week. The seminar will feature talks by Dr. Anastasia Badder (University of Cambridge) and Dr. Jo-Ann Myers (Leo Baeck College), and responses from Dr. Farah Ahmed (University of Cambridge) and me. We will explore the nature of ‘progress’ n Progressive religious contexts and the significance of language and literacy learning for religious community identity, focusing on Jewish and Muslim educational contexts. The seminar will take place on Zoom on Wednesday, 16 November, 12:30 – 1:45pm (UK time). Check out the short article on InterFaith Week events and a recording of our panel.

ASHA Editor’s Award for LSHSS article

An article I co-authored with Monique Mills, Rong Cong, Somin Kim, and Bethany Frick has been honored with the Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools 2022 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Editor’s Award. An Editor’s Award is given by the editor-in-chief of each of the ASHA journals for the article that the editor-in-chief and editors feel meets the highest quality standards in research design, presentation, and impact for a given year. Our article Perceptions of Black children’s narrative language: A mixed-methods study is open access, so check it out!

Intercultural English Language Programs at OSU

The Ohio State University’s English as a Second Language (ESL) Program has a new name: The Intercultural English Language Programs reflects a more expanded notion of English language learning. The new name reflects a more expanded notion of English language learning. Learn more about our programs.