How SUVs conquered the world – at the expense of its climate

I was interviewed by The Guardian (UK) newspaper about Sport Utility Vehicles (SUVs): how they came to dominate the US market, and their damage to the environment, cities and people:

How SUVs conquered the world – at the expense of its climate,”  The Guardian, 1 September 2020.

The article was also reprinted in Slate:

C U, SUV: The hulking car has become the world’s most dominant form of transportation—and one of its biggest climate threats,” Slate, 8 September 2020.

 

Webinar: Impacts of COVID-19 on Mobility

On July 29th, I participated in a webinar on the Impacts of COVID-19 on Mobility, organized by The Ohio State University College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering and the OSU Alumni Association.   The recording is posted below.  Very interesting discussion; worth watching!

 

 

Faculty and industry experts have a conversation about the potential implications of COVID-19 on the design of our communities and various modes of transportation including air travel, personal vehicles, public transit, micro-mobility and ride-hailing services.

Panelists:

  • Chris Atkinson, Director, The Ohio State University Smart Mobility Program
  • Jennifer Clark, Professor and Section Head, City and Regional Planning
  • Harvey Miller, Reusche Chair in Geographic Information Science; Director, Center for Urban and Regional Analysis
  • Sophia Mohr, Chief Innovation Officer, Central Ohio Transit Authority
  • Stephanie Morgan, Executive Director, Air Transportation and Aerospace Campus
  • Giorgio Rizzoni, Center for Automative Research, Ford Motor Company Chair, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Evidence of Increased Vehicle Speeding in Ohio’s Major Cities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

New paper:   Lee, J., Porr, A. and Miller, H.J. (2020) “Evidence of increased vehicle speeding in Ohio’s major cities during the COVID-19 pandemic,” Transportation Findings, June. https://doi.org/10.32866/001c.12988

Abstract.  This paper compares the speeding patterns before and after the COVID-19 pandemic in three major cities in Ohio, USA: Columbus, Cincinnati, and Cleveland. Using high-resolution and real-time INRIX traffic data, we find evidence of increased speeding in all three cities. In particular, we observe an increase in the spatial extent of speeding as well as in the average level of speeding. We also find the mean differences in speeding before and after the COVID-19 outbreak are statistically significant within the study areas.