Why faster geographic information is not always smarter

New publication: Miller, H.J. (2020) “GIScience, fast and slow – Why faster geographic information is not always smarter,” Progress in Human Geography, 44, 129-138.

Geographic information observatories and opportunistic GIScience

The first of three GIS status update reports commissioned by PiHG:

Miller, H. J. (2017) “Geographic information science I: Geographic information observatories and opportunistic GIScience,” Progress in Human Geography.  Online publication date: May-15-2017.  DOI: 10.1177/0309132517710741

Abstract: Geographic information observatories (GIOs) extend the capabilities for observatory-based science to the broad geographic data associated with a place or region. GIOs are a form of scientific instrumentation that affords a holistic view of geographic data. This potentially could lead to new insights about geographic information, as well as the human and coupled human-natural systems described by this information. In this report, I discuss GIOs in light of a timely question – what new types of GIScience should we be doing with big geographic data? I argue that GIOs also allow for a new type of opportunistic geographic information science that leverages real-world events via ongoing observation, experimentation and decision-support.

Keywords: data science, geographic information observatory, natural experiments, opportunistic science, spatial decision support

2017 Mapping Science Committee

I’m looking forward to chairing the Mapping Science Committee (MSC) of the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine! We have a great committee for the next three years:

  • Harvey J. Miller, Chair, The Ohio State University
  • Daniel G. Brown, University of Michigan
  • Stewart Fotheringham, Arizona State University
  • Henry Lin, Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark E. Reichardt, Open GIS Consortium, Inc.
  • Kathleen Stewart, University of Maryland
  • Kristin M. Tolle, Microsoft Research
  • Grady H. Tuell, 3D Ideas
  • Martha McCart Wells, Spatial Focus, Inc.

Here are the biographical sketches for this first-rate team.

The MSC organizes and oversees National Research Council studies that provide independent advice to society and to government at all levels on geospatial science, technology, and policy. It also addresses aspects of geographic information science that deal with the acquisition, integration, storage, distribution, and use of spatial data. Through its studies, the committee promotes the informed and responsible development and use of spatial data for the benefit of society.