NASEM Mapping Science Committee webinar: Geospatial Needs for a Pandemic-Resilient World. 

Epidemics and pandemics such as the COVID-19 outbreak have clear geographic dimensions due to the vector spreading the virus (human contact), demographics and co-morbidity factors that vary geographically, the distributed and heterogeneous nature of health care systems, and the highly variable response and interventions from political authorities and the public-at-large. The decline and shifts in human activity also affect broader social, economic and environmental systems to varying degrees. Geospatial information can play vital roles in crafting effective government and societal responses at the operational, tactical and strategic levels.

On 17 June 2020, the Mapping Science Committee of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine will host an online workshop on Geospatial Needs for a Pandemic-Resilient World.  This workshop will explore the needs of federal agencies, organizations, and scientists for geospatial data science to understand and respond to epidemics/pandemics and developing infrastructure and policies that facilitate effective management and graceful recovery from these types of shocks.  This workshop is free and open to the public.

Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing and self-reinforcing

A study led by Jinhyung Lee from Ohio State’s Center for Urban and Regional Analysis (CURA) finds deepening and self-reinforcing polarization of neighborhood housing values in Columbus, Ohio.  Factors long thought to impact neighborhood values – distance to downtown, nearby highways, or attractions such as city parks – no longer matter as much as the neighborhoods themselves.

OSU News article: Gap between rich, poor neighborhoods growing in some cities