Evidence of Increased Vehicle Speeding in Ohio’s Major Cities during the COVID-19 Pandemic

New paper:   Lee, J., Porr, A. and Miller, H.J. (2020) “Evidence of increased vehicle speeding in Ohio’s major cities during the COVID-19 pandemic,” Transportation Findings, June. https://doi.org/10.32866/001c.12988

Abstract.  This paper compares the speeding patterns before and after the COVID-19 pandemic in three major cities in Ohio, USA: Columbus, Cincinnati, and Cleveland. Using high-resolution and real-time INRIX traffic data, we find evidence of increased speeding in all three cities. In particular, we observe an increase in the spatial extent of speeding as well as in the average level of speeding. We also find the mean differences in speeding before and after the COVID-19 outbreak are statistically significant within the study areas.

CURA report: Less traffic is leading to more speeding in Ohio’s major cities during the Coronavirus pandemic

The Center for Urban and Regional Analysis (CURA) released a report that compared traffic data for Ohio’s three major cities for March-April 2020 versus 2019.  Less traffic during the Coronavirus crisis is leading to more speeding, especially extreme speeding.

CURA research report: Evidence Of Increased Vehicle Speeding In Ohio’s Major Cities During The Coronavirus Pandemic

This report is featured in several news sources:

  1. Ohio State News
  2. WOSU Public Media
  3. The Columbus Dispatch
  4. Columbus Underground
  5. WEWS TV5 Cleveland

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