Trends that will shape us: Transportation

On April 7, I participated in a panel discussion at the Columbus Metropolitan Club; topic: Trends that Will Shape Us: Transportation. Other guests include Jack Marchbanks (Director, Ohio Department of Transportation) and Kevin Chambers (Managing Director – Logistics, Distribution and Supply Chain, JobsOhio).

It was an interesting and lively conversation: spanning public transit, the impact of COVID on cities, social equity, infrastructure, freight and logistics.  Check it out!

Link to recording

 

 

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, US National Academies

I am honored and pleased to be appointed to the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) at the US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. The BESR oversees a wide range of Earth science issues, including research, the environment, natural hazards, resources, geographic science and geospatial information, and data and education. It also provides guidance on U.S. participation in international Earth science programs.

I am looking forward to some very stimulating conversations and activities.

More on the BESR

Urban transit took a pandemic wallop. Can it bounce back?

I was interviewed for an article in the Christian Science Monitor about the impacts of the COVID pandemic on public transit. The reporter did a nice job of summarizing my thoughts on the role of public transit at this moment in history:

Self-driving cars offer some hope to reduce pollution in the near future. Yet progress has been slow, says Professor Miller, and autonomous vehicles aren’t likely to enter city streets within the decade. Even at their electrified best, he says, cars are still an inefficient form of transportation, and hence an imperfect solution to the climate crisis.

In his opinion, the moment demands a grand shift in thought. If viewed as a foundational piece of urban infrastructure, public transit could expand this decade and cement a larger role in the transportation ecosystem. Permitting residents a larger menu of options when traveling – say biking, walking, or riding buses or subways – would help conserve city space, lower spending, and protect the environment.

Urban transit took a pandemic wallop. Can it bounce back? Christian Science Monitor, 25 Feb 2021