Geographic information observatories and opportunistic GIScience

The first of three GIS status update reports commissioned by PiHG:

Miller, H. J. (2017) “Geographic information science I: Geographic information observatories and opportunistic GIScience,” Progress in Human Geography.  Online publication date: May-15-2017.  DOI: 10.1177/0309132517710741

Abstract: Geographic information observatories (GIOs) extend the capabilities for observatory-based science to the broad geographic data associated with a place or region. GIOs are a form of scientific instrumentation that affords a holistic view of geographic data. This potentially could lead to new insights about geographic information, as well as the human and coupled human-natural systems described by this information. In this report, I discuss GIOs in light of a timely question – what new types of GIScience should we be doing with big geographic data? I argue that GIOs also allow for a new type of opportunistic geographic information science that leverages real-world events via ongoing observation, experimentation and decision-support.

Keywords: data science, geographic information observatory, natural experiments, opportunistic science, spatial decision support

Out for Good podcast on Mobility in Columbus

I am happy to be part of the first episode of Out for Good, a weekly podcast that explores issues facing Central Ohio and highlights the individuals and organizations making an impact.

Elissa Scheider (Transit Columbus) and I discuss why mobility is important to our community with co-hosts Jason Phillips and J.M. Rayburn.  You can listen to the podcast here.

Cars are like beer or ice cream

Cars are like beer or ice cream; fine in moderation, but bad to binge on.

My interview with ASU News, in association with my visit to Arizona State University to deliver the 16th Annual Malcolm Comeaux Lecture:

ASU lecture features professor who says geographical information systems can help transportation