On-line Education Discusses Vasculitis and What The Primary Care Physician Needs To Know

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 On-line Education Discusses Vasculitis and What The Primary Care Physician Needs To Know. Vasculitides such as granulomatosis with polyangiitis are potentially deadly diseases and patients will usually first present to their primary care physician with signs and symptoms of vasculitis. But these diseases can be difficult to diagnose so today on MedNet, we’re going to help you to be able to identify vasculitis in your patients and give you an overview of the treatment of vasculitis. First, to tell you about pulmonary manifestations of vasculitis is pulmonologist and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Dr. Lynn Fussner. And then, to tell you about renal manifestations of vasculitis is nephrologist and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine Dr. Salem Almaani. And finally, to share about the treatment of vasculitis is rheumatologist and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Dr. Alexa Meara.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: REVIEW the classification and defining features of ANCA-associated vasculitis; and HIGHLIGHT clinical findings that could suggest sinopulmonary manifestations of vasculitis.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • Presenting signs and symptoms of vasculitis
  • Prognosis of vasculitis
  • When to stop treatment
  • Microscopic polyangiitis
  • Distinguishing between vasculitides by kidney biopsy
  • Whether vasculitis patients with ESRD need to be treated

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

On-line Enduring Material Teaches on Adrenal Nodules

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014 On-line Enduring Material Teaches on Adrenal Nodules. Pheochromocytomas are fairly rare with about 1,000 cases in the U.S. every year but overall, adrenal tumors are common, and you can find one in about every 20 patients who undergo abdominal CT scans. Most of these adrenal tumors are benign and require no treatment but knowing which ones are consequential and which ones are inconsequential can be a challenge. On this CME webcast, to show you how to manage the incidentally identified adrenal tumor is surgical oncologist and Assistant Professor of Surgery at the Ohio State University, we have Dr. Drew Shirley.

View a video introduction of this webcast

What you’ll learn in this webcast

As a result of this educational activity, webcast participants will be able to: UNDERSTAND the imaging characteristics used to determine treatment strategies for adrenal nodules; and USE biochemical tests to aid in the diagnosis of functional adrenal nodules.

You’ll also learn about the following:

  • Causes of adrenal nodules
  • Which adrenal nodule need to be biopsied
  • Familial syndromes involving adrenal tumors
  • Incidental adrenal nodules found when staging lung cancer
  • Performing adrenal nodule needle biopsy and FNA
  • What to expect during and after adrenal surgery
  • Approach to adrenal hemorrhage
  • Radiographic imaging follow-up of adrenal nodules
  • Laboratory follow-up of adrenal nodules in patients with hypertension

You can find this and many other MedNet21 programs on the OSU – CCME website.

Call our MedNet21 Program Manager at 614.293.3473 for more details about subscribing to MedNet21 as a hospital or as an individual. You can also e-mail him at derrick.freeman@osumc.edu.

What Hospital Site Administrators Need to do for MOC

OSUWexnerbloglogo2014Here’s a guide to help you understand what Hospital Site Administrators need to do for Maintenance of Certification (MOC). One of the most important items is ensuring that attendees are signing in before your CME Webcast sessions and indicating if they they would like CME, MOC, or both during the group viewing.  If physicians would like MOC, they must take the pre-test on our website (https://ccme.osu.edu/) before coming to the webcast group viewing.

Here’s what the time sheet should look like. Make sure it has a checkbox or something similar for selecting MOC. If attendees want MOC, they must select the checkbox or indicate “Yes”. This is important because if they select that they want MOC, you will not assign them CME for attending the webcast.

For each attendee that indicates that they would like MOC on the time sheet, you’ll need to navigate to the Admin Section for the webcast to indicate their intent, by selecting the MOC checkbox for the webcast.

Here’s how to do this.

Log into your account and click the Admin Section button.  Once in the Admin Section, click the Webcasts button.

Click the Select button to choose a webcast.

Notice that there is an MOC checkbox  on the screen next to the name of the physician.

Click the checkbox for each individual that indicated that they want MOC.

Also, for any person that wants MOC, you cannot assign that person a CME credit. This is because with MOC there is a self assessment element to the educational process, and a pre-test and post-test must be completed to earn the MOC point.

The only way individuals can get MOC is by completing the pre-test before viewing the webcast, and then by passing the post-test after the webcast. If the user takes the pre-test and passes the post-test, a CME credit and an MOC point will be added to their on-line account.