China’s Online Literature talk

Online Talk: China’s Online Literature and the Problem of Preservation
Dr. Michel Hockx
Thursday, November 16, 2023
6:00-7:30p.m. CST
Virtual event held on Zoom.

Please register to attend:

https://kansas.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMqfuqqrz4uH9YY5V5uoODOT6PN3sSzv6O2

Abstract

Since their introduction in the late 1990s, websites devoted to the production and discussion of literary work have been ubiquitous on the Chinese Web. Over the years, the study of online literature has become an established field of inquiry within the Chinese academy. General studies and textbooks have been produced, and especially for the first decade or so of online literary production, there appears to be consensus on what were the most important sites, authors, and works. This emerging canon of born-digital works, however, can rarely still be found online in its original location and context. This paper addresses the challenges of preserving early Chinese Internet literature, as well as the opportunities for literary analysis when preservation does take place.

About the speaker

Dr. Michel Hockx is professor of Chinese Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and director of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He has published widely, both in English and in Chinese, on topics related to modern Chinese literary culture, especially early 20th-century Chinese magazine literature and print culture and contemporary Internet literature. His monograph Internet Literature in China was listed by Choice magazine as one of the “Top 25 Outstanding Academic Titles of 2015.”

Posted by: Faye Xiao <hxiao@ku.edu>

Genre trends in Chinese-language cinema

Lecture: Post-Pandemic Era: Different Genre Trends in Chinese-Language Cinema in Mainland, Hong Kong, and Taiwan
By Peggy Chiao
Friday, November 10, 2023, 3:00 PM- 5:00 PM
Meyerson Conference Room (WCH 4.118)
University of Texas, Austin

After the pandemic, films in Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan have evolved into different genres, reflecting the societal changes and collective consciousness in these three regions. My speech will focus on the development of various genres and how the diverse economic, social, and political situations behind them have resulted in these distinctions. Film markets worldwide went through a hiatus during the pandemic for several years. In Mainland China, after COVID-19, the film industry welcomed a thriving box-office boom. It developed new genres and saw innovation in creativity, aesthetics, and marketing strategies, posing a significant threat to the traditionally dominant Hollywood films. In contrast, Hong Kong and Taiwan had been targeting the Mainland Chinese market before the pandemic, leading to a divide within their domestic film industries regarding whether to ‘go north’ (literally translated as “North Drifter,” referring to those working in the Mainland). During the pandemic, the ‘going north’ trend came to a halt due to travel restrictions and regulations. Interestingly, both regions witnessed a surge in their local film industries. Hong Kong experienced a rise in small independent films, often with subversive socio-political undertones. Taiwan’s film industry, on the other hand, focused on survival and developing niche genre films with established markets. Continue reading

The ‘Rhythm’ of Revolution talk

The “Rhythm” of Revolution: Body Politics and the Voice in the Leftist Poetry Recitation

Join the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies for a lecture featuring Ling Kang, Associate Professor in Modern Chinese Literature in the Department of Chinese Language and Literature at Fudan University.

Wednesday, October 25th at 7 pm US Central Time via Zoom. Here is the registration link:

https://uchicagogroup.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_k9eNx_L3R76SB8xG7YcVjA

LECTURE ABSTRACT:

In 1932, a group of leftist poets in Shanghai established the China Poetry Society, aiming to produce poetry that would enlighten and mobilize the masses to be the self-conscious political subject. This talk revisits the poetic works and theories of the members of the Society, focusing in particular on the extensive discussion on the historical origin and political relevance of poetic rhythm and its relationship with labor. Tracking the transnational circulation and transformation of the new knowledge of bodily rhythm and poetic rhythm since the late 19th century, this talk shows how a new conception of poetic rhythm as a mediating and mobilizing device gave rise to a series of leftist poetic experiments that attempted to construct the collective political subject through invoking the bodily solidarity of the laboring masses.

Posted by: Connie Yip cyip@uchicago.edu

Museums as Bridges of Understanding talk

Dear all,

The ‘Global Diasporic Chinese Museums Network Initiative Public Talk Series’ will host the third talk on Friday 13 October. Our speaker is Ms. Carmelea Ang See, Director, Bahay Tsinoy, Museum of Chinese in Philippine Life. She will give a talk on Museums as Bridges of Understanding: The Bahay Tsinoy Experience 构建理解之桥:以菲华历史博物馆的经验为例.

The talk will be given in English. Simultaneous translation into Mandarin Chinese will be provided.

Date: Friday 13 October 2023
Time: 12:00 pm to 13:30 pm (BST)
Venue: Online
Zoom ID: 825 3771 6294
Password: 12345
Meeting link:
https://ntu-sg.zoom.us/j/82537716294?pwd=NmJ3dWI5Q3lSSmxqanpPL3dOYTRyZz09#success

Abstract

Considering what is happening now in our part of Southeast Asia, it is more crucial now, more than ever, to distinguish the Tsinoys (our term for the Chinese in the Philippines) from the new immigrants from mainland China. This talk revolves around the role Bahay Tsinoy plays against this backdrop. The existence of the museum itself as a repository of the historical and cultural legacy of the Chinese in the Philippines showcases the plural diversity of Philippine society. Beyond the physical museum, the myriad ways of reaching out to the public act as a bridge of understanding and acceptance between the Tsinoys (Chinese Filipinos) and mainstream Filipinos. Continue reading

Questioning Borders book launch

On Wed 9/27 (3-4:30 EDT), Professor Mark Bender of Ohio State University will have a short discussion with Robin Visser about her new book, Questioning Borders: Ecoliteratures of China and Taiwan (Columbia UP, 2023), followed by audience questions. Register here: https://carolinaasiacenter.unc.edu/event/visser-book-launch/

Posted by: Robin Visser <rvisser@email.unc.edu>

Overseas Chinese History Museum lecture

The ‘Global Diasporic Chinese Museums Network Initiative Public Talk Series’ will be hosting the next talk on Monday 18th September at 12: 00 pm to 13:30 pm (BST)

Our speaker, Mr. Ning Yi, Deputy Director of Overseas Chinese History Museum of China, will give a talk on Tracing the History of Chinese Diasporas and Narrating Stories of Cultural Exchange — Explorations and Practices at the Overseas Chinese History Museum of China. The talk will be given in Mandarin Chinese. Simultaneous translation into English is provided.

The event is jointly hosted by HOMELandS (Hub On Migration, Exile, Languages and Spaces) at University of Westminster and the Chinese Heritage Centre of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. It is organised as part of the project Global Diasporic Chinese Museums Network Initiative funded by AHRC.

This is a free event, held online via Zoom. Please register here – Eventbrite link – for access to the meeting on the day.

Best wishes,

Cangbai Wang c.wang6@westminster.ac.uk

Liang Hong and Liu Zhenyun in the UK

Liang Hong and Liu Zhenyun in the UK for the Sinoist Books Chinese author roadshow
Sinoist Author Roadshow 2023
10–18 October

This October join us in for a UK-spanning roadshow featuring two of China’s premier literary authors. Immerse yourself in the art of storytelling with the eminent Chinese authors Liang Hong (梁鸿) and Liu Zhenyun (刘震云). Explore how their books arrived in English translation through a variety of exclusive events.

More details in the weblink here
https://sinoistbooks.com/our-events/2023-sinoist-roadshow/

Schedule
(10 October) Manchester – The Manchester China Institute – Physical
(11 October) Leeds – The Leeds Centre for New Chinese Writing – Physical/Virtual 
(12 October) Newcastle – The Confucius Institute at Newcastle University – Physical
(13 October) Edinburgh – The Confucius Institute for Scotland
(16 October) SOAS – SOAS (NOT PUBLIC FACING) – Physical
(17 October) Oxford – Oxford International Centre for Publishing / Oxford Brookes Confucius Institute – Physical
(18 October) London – China Exchange (CHINESE ONLY) – Physical/Virtual

Posted by: Daniel Li <Daniel.li@alaincharlesasia.com>

Babel of Chinese SF Aug. event

Babel of Chinese SF August Event
Lu Hang on “Tongji Bridge:” When Tradition Meets Robotics
To join us, send an email to babelofchinesesf@gmail.com for the event link!
Beijing Time: 20:00, August 11, 2023.
UK Summer Time: 13:00, August 11, 2023.

Fiction: “Tongji Bridge” by Lu Hang
Translated by Li Yi

Chinese Version: https://freewechat.com/a/MjM5OTAxMzMwMA==/2652021465/2

English Version: In Galaxy Awards 1: Chinese Science Fiction Anthology (https://www.amazon.ca/Galaxy-Awards-Chinese-Science-Anthology-ebook/dp/B0BR5Y8Q5Z/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=)

Walk across Tongji, ward off worries.
[……]
I knew that the unison cheering would turn into diverse comments once I took off the Lion Head at the closing of the show. What a miserable imitator and disgrace to the national essence, some might criticize; or, what a genius innovator and ground breaker, others might applaud. However, I did not do this to get their feedback.

But, for my seventh great-uncle to watch a dragon and lion dance show once more.

Or better, if our performance attracted new interest, and new apprentices came to learn the traditional art from us. I would pass it on without reservation to anyone who would dedicate themselves to the art, no matter where that person was from, or rather, no matter that was a person or not. (From “Tongji Bridge” By Lu Hang) Continue reading

Liao Yiwu and Ian Johnson on dissent

Source: Asia Society (nd)
ChinaFile Presents: The Future of Dissent Inside and Outside of China
A discussion with authors Liao Yiwu and Ian Johnson

Liao Yiwu, Paris, April 2, 2019

Liao Yiwu poses during a photo session in Paris, April 2, 2019. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP via Getty Images

Event Details
IN-PERSON
Wed 12 Jul 2023; 6:30 – 8 p.m.
Asia Society
725 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10021
Click for directions
BUY TICKETS
$15 Nonmembers; $8 Students and Seniors; Free for Members

Please join us for a discussion with internationally acclaimed Chinese author Liao Yiwu, co-hosted by PEN America. A reporter, novelist, poet, and musician, Liao is best known for The Corpse Walker, his 2008 collection of interviews with laborers, migrants, and other people living at the margins of China’s economic boom, and for For a Song and a Hundred Songs, a memoir of the prison term he served for his writings about the Tiananmen protests. Since 2011, he has lived in exile in Berlin.

In conversation with the Council on Foreign Relations’ Ian Johnson, Liao will discuss the role of political dissent in exile, the use of fiction as a means for grappling with history, as well as his recent novels Wuhan, about the outbreak of COVID-19, and Love in the Times of Mao Zedong, set during the Cultural Revolution, and his documentary film on the construction of a Taiwanese memorial to Nobel Peace Prize-winning dissident Liu Xiaobo.

The conversation will be conducted in Chinese and English with translation, and is co-hosted by ChinaFile and PEN America. Continue reading

Anti-May Fourth Films of Republican China

MAY 3 ONLINE EVENT: “Anti-May Fourth Films of Republican China”
Public online lecture by Christopher Rea
Hosted by the Australian Centre for China in the World

EVENT INFO: https://ciw.anu.edu.au/events/anti-may-fourth-films-republican-china

REGISTRATION: https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/anti-may-fourth-films-of-republican-china-tickets-628191877817

EVENT DESCRIPTION

Nora should not step out and find her own way. She should stay at home, dress modestly, and be a good wife. Chinese silent films of the 1920s and early 1930s often convey ideological messages strikingly at odds with May Fourth ideals such as equality of the sexes and liberation of the individual. While some films express sympathy for progressive causes and outrage at present inequalities, others are overtly misogynistic and reactionary. This talk will focus on Chinese-made films that May Fourth figures would consider to be on the wrong side of history, and show how they harness the power of the film medium—charismatic stars, special effects, popular Hollywood tropes—to take us back to the good old days. On this May Fourth anniversary, bring your sense of righteousness and film studies sensibilities to a tour through moral dramas such as The Pearl Necklace 一串珍珠 (1926), Don’t Change Your Husband 情海重吻 (1929), Poor Daddy 怕老婆 (1929), Love and Duty 戀愛與義務 (1931), and The Peach Girl 桃花泣血記 (1931). #NoraStayHome

Christopher Rea

Indigenous Taiwan, Transpacific Connections talks

Indigenous Taiwan, Transpacific Connections
台灣原住民文化: 跨越太平洋的聯結

Bilingual videos of eight talks with four Taiwan writers and filmmakers about Indigeneity, art, and life in contemporary Taiwan:

Writer Badai 巴代

“Indigenous literary practices in postcolonial Taiwan” (43 mins): https://youtu.be/df48hcX2xCw

“Indigenous culture in modern society” (41 mins): https://youtu.be/z89TuiduB7o

Filmmaker Wei Te-sheng 魏德聖

“The making of the first blockbuster film about Taiwan’s Indigenous history” (43 mins): https://youtu.be/2lfaTFpm5tE

“Representing Taiwan tribes in ‘Warriors of the Rainbow'” (37 mins): https://youtu.be/-wEsvAS0EV4

Writer Ahronglong Sakinu 亞榮隆撒可奴

“Reviving Taiwan Indigenous practices for a new generation” (58 mins): https://youtu.be/vfMpMUpFEqI

“Mountain boars and flying squirrels in ‘Hunter School'” (44 mins): https://youtu.be/ISDPzkXTPrI
Continue reading

UC Davis lecture by Tani Barlow

The UC Davis History Department invites you to the 2023 Virtual Liu Lecture, which is free and open to the public. It will be delivered by Professor Tani Barlow of Rice University, who will speak on “Instinct, Society, Vitality: Li Zehou’s Farewell to Life Philosophy” at 15:10 to 16:30 on Tuesday, March 14, followed by a Q&A session. Registration information is available here.

Li Shicen’s (1892–1934) evolutionary Bergsonian Marxism exemplifies how Chinese philosophers — Zhang Zhunmai (1887-1969), Cai Yuanpei (1868-1940), Zhang Dongsun (1886-1973), Li Jingxi (1857-1925), Feng Youlan (1895-1990) — struggled to resolve the question of “structuration of life,” or human bodily evolution. Evolutionary philosophy is where Chinese modernists debated “life” (shenghuo) and “intuition” (zhijue), meaning insight into organic life, particularly in the debate over “science and the outlook on life” (kexue yu renshengguan lunzhan). Li Shicen, was a radical who incorporated earlier Ruists like Wang Yangming (1472–1529) and Dai Zhen (1724—1777) into his radicalism by fusing sexual difference to political philosophy. Li Shicen, like early Li Zehou, was not iconoclastic. However, Li Shicen and Li Zehou are opposite figures in the historical integration of life philosophy into existing modes of thinking. When Li Zehou superseded “life” and imposed the category of “culture,” he extinguished radical elements in philosophy and masculinized the human: he exsanguinated a vital, sexual, streak in Chinese philosophy and replaced it with an abstract, modernist, neo-Confucian “tradition,” grounded in a masculinist, Kantian-Confucian imaginary. Continue reading

China’s Online Literature and the Problem of Preservation

Webinar: Dr. Michel Hockx – China’s Online Literature and the Problem of Preservation
Thursday, March 30, 2023
6:00-7:30p.m. CST
Virtual event held on Zoom.
Please register to attend:
https://kansas.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIsfuuhqz4tHNMIRYEJ1dHGDkH_7fvjGM78

Abstract

Since its inception in the late 1990s, websites devoted to the production and discussion of literary work have been ubiquitous on the Chinese Web. Over the years, the study of online literature has become an established field of inquiry within the Chinese academy. General studies and textbooks have been produced, and especially for the first decade or so of online literary production, there appears to be consensus on what were the most important sites, authors, and works. This emerging canon of born-digital works, however, can rarely still be found online in its original location and context. This paper addresses the challenges of preserving early Chinese Internet literature, as well as the opportunities for literary analysis when preservation does take place.

About the speaker

Dr. Michel Hockx is professor of Chinese Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and director of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He has published widely, both in English and in Chinese, on topics related to modern Chinese literary culture, especially early 20th-century Chinese magazine literature and print culture and contemporary Internet literature. His monograph Internet Literature in China was listed by Choice magazine as one of the “Top 25 Outstanding Academic Titles of 2015.”

Posted by: Faye Xiao <hxiao@ku.edu>

China’s Path from Poverty to the Gilded Age

Webinar – China’s Path from Poverty to the Gilded Age
Date: Monday, 6 March 2023
Time: 12pm-1.30pm, EST (5pm-6.30pm, GMT)
Register here: https://www.soas.ac.uk/about/event/chinas-path-poverty-gilded-age

Abstract

Over the last four decades, China has undergone a great transformation – from impoverishment to a Gilded Age of rapid growth paired with corruption and inequality. What lessons of development should the world learn from this mixed outcome?

Drawing from her books, How China Escaped the Poverty Trap (2016) and China’s Gilded Age (2020), Professor Yuen Yuen Ang underscores three lessons. (1) Learn from both China’s successes and failures: In China, the past success of industrial capitalism under a collective leadership laid the seeds for its problems today, including corruption, inequality, and political fragmentation. (2) Don’t learn the wrong lessons: China’s success does not prove that autocracy is superior to democracy in performance; rather, it reminds us that autocracies must temper its worst tendencies in order to perform. (3) Adapt the right national lessons to different national contexts, rather than blindly emulating and copying. Professor Ang stresses that these lessons apply to China’s rise as much as they apply to lessons we’ve drawn, correctly and incorrectly, from the rise of the West. Continue reading

Shi Tiesheng and Li Er events

List members might be interested in Sinoist Books Winter Season of Chinese Literature. We have two events coming up this season:

Shi Tiesheng’s My Travels in Ding Yi 
23rd February (7:30pm GMT) (LINK)
With Professor Sarah Dauncey, whose research focuses on disability in China, and Chloe Starr, Associate Professor of Asian Christianity and theology.

Li Er’s Cherries on a Pomegranate Tree 
31st March (5pm GMT) (LINK)
With translator Dave Haysom

More details in the Eventbrite below
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/clrcuk-winter-season-feb-and-march-next-up-shi-tiesheng-tickets-540945270867

Daniel Li <danielyangli92@gmail.com>