Asiascape–cfp

Call for papers: Asiascape: Digital Asia Anniversary Issue
The Shape of the Asiascape: Ten Years of Digital Asia Research

The peer-reviewed academic journal Asiascape: Digital Asia (DIAS) is now inviting contributions for its 2023 anniversary special issue, “The Shape of the Asiascape: Ten Years of Digital Asia Research”. This anniversary issue will take stock of advances and trends in research about digital Asia. It asks what a decade of Asiascape research has revealed about dynamics in the region and its varied digital societies. Are there national or regional Internets that form an ‘Asiascape’, and how do they differ from the ‘global’ Internet? Does ‘digital Asia’ truly exist, and if so: in what guises? By revisiting the current state-of-the-field, the short (4,000-word) contributions to this special issue will examine the multi-disciplinary, regional, and transnational concerns that have shaped Asiascape’s diverse research programmes. Collectively, they will ask how digital Asia features in contemporary discussions, whether in a mainstream, scholarly, or tech journalism context. Looking forward, the contributions will identify potential blindspots in the scholarship and propose ways forward for the next decade of multi- and interdisciplinary digital Asia research. Continue reading

In the Event of Women roundtable

Dear colleagues,

I’m sharing with you the recording of the Zoom roundtable “In the Event of Women” (with English subtitles).

Youtube Link: https://youtu.be/lCgfWX-7R78

Independently sponsored by the MLA’s LLC Modern and Contemporary Chinese Forum (members: Haiyan Lee, Nick Admussen, Liang Luo, Ping Zhu, and Nicolai Volland), this online roundtable convenes eight feminist scholars whose research interests cover the studies of history, social sciences, literature, and culture in China, Japan, and South Korea to celebrate the publication of Tani Barlow’s new monograph, In the Event of Women (Duke UP, Jan 2022).

Participants:

Tani Barlow (Rice University)
Ruri Ito (Tsuda University)
Rebecca Karl (New York University)
Suzy Kim (Rutgers University)
Nicola Spakowski (University of Freiburg)
Sharon Wesoky (Allegheny College)
Xueping Zhong (Tufts University)
Ping Zhu (University of Oklahoma)

Presider:

Ping Zhu (University of Oklahoma)

MLA 2022, East Asia-related panels

Jack Chen, current secretary and incoming chair of the MLA Pre-14th Century Chinese Forum, compiled a full list of Asian-related panels at the MLA 2022. Find the list below.

Best regards,

Liang Luo
Current secretary and incoming chair
MLA Modern and Contemporary Chinese Forum

MLA 2022: Sessions related to East Asia
(V) = virtual; (P) = in person

Thursday, January 6, 2022 / 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM

Decolonial and Indigenous Interventions in Japanophone Media and Literature (V)
Presider: Andrea Mendoza, U of California, San Diego

Presentations

Between Diversity and Assimilation: Revisiting Tadayoshi Himeda’s Ethnographic Documentary / Marcos Centeno-Martin, U of London, Birkbeck

Subversion and Transformation of Natural Landscapes in Medoruma Shun’s Decolonial Fiction / Andrea Boccardi, U of Leeds

Self-Discovery and Assimilation: Colonial Literary Modernity in Japanophone Taiwanese Literature / Ying Xue Liu, U of Maryland, College Park

Japanophone Literature: ‘The Question about Japaneseness’ / Paul McQuade, Cornell U Continue reading

Texas Asia Conference–cfp deadline extension

The Department of Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin is pleased to announce the Texas Asia Conference 2022: “Transitions and Transformations.” The deadline for abstract submission has been extended to January 7, 2022. The conference will take place on February 25th and 26th at the University of Texas at Austin. Please find the CFP information below.

The Texas Asia Conference (TAC) is a biennial and international graduate student conference organized by the graduate students of the Department of Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. The upcoming conference will take place on February 25th and 26th, 2022, at the University of Texas at Austin’s Glickman Conference Center (the conference will move online if necessary). The conference provides a space to present and engage with graduate research work centered on Asia as a regional focus from various disciplinary perspectives. 

With this year’s conference theme, Transitions and Transformations, we invite proposals for individual papers and/or panels that explore various approaches to this topic. The last two years have made precarity a widespread condition. Faced with constant changes and conflicts, we are reaching an inflection point from which political institutions, public health, and ecosystems are taking unpredictable turns. Instead of returning to what has previously been considered the norm, it is high time for us to anticipate and adapt to the new normal. A time of crisis is also a time of opportunity, as we are witnessing new directions and conversations emerging from academia, ranging from reconsiderations of time and space to reassessments of asymmetrical geopolitical relations. Standing at this threshold moment, we propose a colloquium where important dialogues on the shared future of Asia and the world can be initiated. How do we reimagine Asia in a time of transitions and transformations? What are some possible contributions that scholarship on Asia can make to help us better cope with the challenges of the Anthropocene?  

Continue reading

A decade of China’s media going global–cfa

Call for Abstracts: “A decade of China’s media going global: issues and perspectives” Conference
Date: May 31, 2022.
Location: Paris (France) & online
Abstract Submission Deadline: February 15, 2022

The year 2012 stands as a significant milestone in China’s government-led external communication activities. It was in early 2012 that Beijing launched television broadcasting and production centers in Washington, DC, USA (CCTV America, now CGTN America) and Nairobi, Kenya (CGTN Africa). Later in the year, it began publishing an African weekly edition of the English-language newspaper China Daily — European and Asian weekly editions launched in 2010. Set in motion under the leadership of President Hu Jintao, China’s global media expansion, part of a larger “going out” policy for the economy in general, sought to improve the country’s image overseas, and to give Beijing a larger say in global information flows.

Ten years on, Chinese media’s global engagement has not only grown, but diversified. Today, Chinese media companies are engaged in content production and distribution, direct investment in foreign media ventures, infrastructure development, training and media development efforts, and “managing” public opinion overseas. The growth and diversification of communication strategies can be partly explained by the fact that the global political and economic context under which Hu Jintao set out to improve China’s international image through external media expansion has changed. The rise (and fall) of Donald Trump in the United States, the use of social media for public diplomacy by “Wolf Warriors” in Xi Jinping’s China, and the debates about the coronavirus pandemic have encouraged a proliferation of polarised narratives. This is reflected in the global communicative strategies of the Chinese government. Continue reading

9th Asian-Pacific Forum on Translation and Intercultural Studies–cfp

CFP: The 9th Asian-Pacific Forum on Translation and Intercultural Studies will be held virtually between March 25-26, 2022 by the Interpreting and Translation Studies Program at the Wake Forest University, USA.

The APFTIS aims to gather students, educators, researchers and practitioners in the translation and interpreting (T&I) and intercultural studies fields to present their research and exchange perspectives on current trends across disciplines. Since the establishment of the Forum in 2011, it has been hosted by a number of prestigious universities around the world and has become one of the most reputable events of its kind.

The 9th Forum is soliciting submissions that reflect diverse theoretical perspectives and empirical research. Topics are broadly defined, and include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

  • T&I services in medical, legal, business, diplomatic, media and non-traditional contexts, i.e. humanitarian crisis, public safety and law enforcement
  • Collaboration between T&I academia and practitioners and industry partners from other domains
  • Community as base for interpreting and translation; i.e. re-enforced and/or re-defined role of T&I in diversified communities
  • Agency of translators and interpreters in global societies; i.e. leadership, construction of a nation’s or world region’s identity and image, impact on cultural memory
  • Big translation and cultural memory: the construction of a nation’s identity /image€
  • New approaches in T&I studies, i.e. trans-creation, adaptation with compensation, self-censorship
  • Cultural factors and T&I strategies
  • Remote interpreting and re-speaking
  • Technology application in T&I, in particular T&I-related AI applications, T&I on demand, post-editing, terminology management, etc.
  • Multimodality in T&I, i.e. audiovisual, videogames, movies
  • T&I education and curriculum development
  • T&I ethics, standards and quality assessment

Continue reading

Making Gender in China–cfp

Call for Papers: Making Gender in China: Third Biennial Conference of the China Academic Network on Gender
Dates: March 29-May 3, 2022. 2hr panels will be held weekly as a virtual conference series on Tuesdays, Toronto time (EST, UTC-5).  
Location: York University, Toronto (online)

We are pleased to announce that the Third Biennial Conference of the China Academic Network on Gender (CHANGE) will be hosted virtually by York University, Toronto. 

The theme of the conference will be ‘Making Gender in China.’ We seek to explore how gender is enacted, negotiated, and disrupted through objects and in the process of making them. How does scrutinizing things (a poem, a cookbook, a translation, a sword, a piece of furniture, noodles, an online protest, or a piece of legislation) help inform and reshape our understanding of gender in China itself? Indeed, material culture and gender studies share a reciprocal methodological outlook on the construction of societal norms. They ask not only how objects – or gender – are being shaped by society, but also how the material world – or gender – in turn shape society itself. Within Chinese studies, fruitful articulations between material culture and gender studies have first focused on areas such as dress, spinning, weaving (Bray, 1997; Ko, 2005). Recent work has expanded into the realm of literati’s writing apparatus, dictionaries and other domestic objects such as furniture, drawing our attention to the importance of interrogating the materiality of the everyday (Ko, 2017; Althenger and Ho, forthcoming). This workshop invites scholars to explore further how gendered divisions of labour or gender roles inform and shape the social lives of objects and vice-versa. If we take gender as a site of social construction, one that is “made,” what do we see when we turn to literal sites where construction takes place: shipyards, factory-floors, theatres, media broadcasting houses, the scholars’ study or the inner quarters? What symbolic and practical social roles do these objects then play in the creation of gender dynamics of daily life? How can they in turn be subverted or redirected from the intention of the maker in the uses to which they are put? Continue reading

National Identity and Millenials in Northeast Asia–cfp

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSAL: “National Identity and Millenials in Northeast Asia: Power and Contestations in the Digital Age” (deadline for proposals: 6 January 2022)

We invite book chapter proposals to be included in a forthcoming volume entitled “National Identity and Millenials in Japan and China: Power and Contestations in the Digital Age” to be published with Routledge (Contemporary Asian Societies Collection).

As Northeast Asian societies and States seek to come to terms with massive transformations – be they demographic, economic, technological or cultural – national identities have come into flux, as socio-economic certainties have waned. This has resulted in ever more prominent and emotional debates surrounding notions of history, belonging, memory, and pride. Younger generations in China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan play an increasingly important role in shaping these debates. This collective project seeks to explore the intersection between national identity formation and youth culture in Northeast Asia by focusing on (1) official discourses, (2) popular (visual) culture, and (3) digital spaces as critical venues for constructing collective identities and shaping political cultures among the young. Continue reading

Qiu Miaojin conference

Qiu Miaojin: Textuality, Visuality, and Desire in Global Circulation

Qiu Miaojin: Textuality, Visuality, and Desire in Global Circulation
December 4, 2021 (Saturday), 9am-5:30pm (HKT)
On ZOOM: Please register and the ZOOM link will be sent to you prior to the event:

https://hkuems1.hku.hk/hkuems/ec_hdetail.aspx?guest=Y&ueid=78221

This conference engages with the literary works of Qiu Miaojin, a famous lesbian and queer writer of Taiwan whose premature death in 1995 marks a watershed moment in queer and literary discourses both in and out of Taiwan. Qiu’s queer classic Notes of a Crocodile (1994) centers on a lesbian protagonist who assumes a non-human alter ego of a crocodile in the narration. Showcasing the clever use of irony, sarcasm, and dark humor, Qiu’s first novel instantly became a defining work of lesbian queer fiction in Taiwan. Qiu’s writing career ended too early when she committed suicide at the young age of twenty-six, leaving us with her last work called Last Words from Montmartre (1996). Recently, filmmaker Evans Chan has also completed a full feature film called Love and Death in Montmartre (2019). This conference brings together scholars who are interested in the lifework of Qiu by considering the impact of her works across the fields of film studies, literary studies, affect theory, queer studies, animal studies, and translation theory. It takes the specific case of Qiu’s lifework to investigate how the mobility of queer desire enables a kind of cross-genre, transmedial, and transnational mode of textuality. Presenters will situate the cultural phenomenon of Qiu Miaojin in broader comparative and global perspectives. The conference brings together literary and cultural critics, a filmmaker, and creative writers from Australia, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, North America, and the UK.

*Film screening: Love and Death in Montmartre 蒙馬特之愛與死 (2019), directed by Evans Chan (Vimeo link will be sent to you prior to the event.) Continue reading

Fantasy and Global Cities, 1830-1930–cfp

Klaudia Lee (City University of Hong Kong) and I have proposed a seminar on the theme of “Fantasy and Global Cities, 1830–1930” for the forthcoming American Comparative Literature Association conference in Taipei from June 15–18, 2022 (with contingency plans for an online conference if needed).

The ACLA abstract deadline has recently been extended till November 30. While we have received enough strong proposals for a small seminar on Fantasy and Global Cities, we still have plenty of room for more papers and would be very pleased to receive more abstracts. The CFP is here: https://www.acla.org/fantasy-and-global-cities-1830-1930.

The decision as to whether the conference will be in person or online will be made in January. If you can only attend the conference in one format or the other, when you submit, please contact Klaudia Lee (City University of Hong Kong, hiuylee@cityu.edu.hk) or me (Taipei Tech <sharinschroeder@mail.ntut.edu.tw>). More information on the ACLA conference can be found here: https://www.acla.org/annual-meeting-2022.

Thank you!

Sharin Schroeder  <sharinschroeder@mail.ntut.edu.tw>

Texas Asia Conference–cfp

The Texas Asia Conference (TAC) is a biennial and international graduate student conference organized by the graduate students of the Department of Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. The upcoming conference will take place on February 25th and 26th, 2022, at the University of Texas at Austin’s Glickman Conference Center (the conference will move online if necessary). The conference provides a space to present and engage with graduate research work centered on Asia as a regional focus from various disciplinary perspectives.

With this year’s conference theme, Transitions and Transformations, we invite proposals for individual papers and/or panels that explore various approaches to this topic. The last two years have made precarity a widespread condition. Faced with constant changes and conflicts, we are reaching an inflection point from which political institutions, public health, and ecosystems are taking unpredictable turns. Instead of returning to what has previously been considered the norm, it is high time for us to anticipate and adapt to the new normal. A time of crisis is also a time of opportunity, as we are witnessing new directions and conversations emerging from academia, ranging from reconsiderations of time and space to reassessments of asymmetrical geopolitical relations. Standing at this threshold moment, we propose a colloquium where important dialogues on the shared future of Asia and the world can be initiated. How do we reimagine Asia in a time of transitions and transformations? What are some possible contributions that scholarship on Asia can make to help us better cope with the challenges of the Anthropocene? Continue reading

Georgetown Journal of Asian Affairs–cfp

Greetings from Georgetown!

We are reaching out because the Georgetown Journal of Asian Affairs is currently accepting research manuscripts for Volume 8 (Spring 2022). We welcome submissions from students and scholars and would appreciate it if you could share our call for papers announcement with your students and departments.

The Journal welcomes original social science research papers written on issues relevant to politics, security, economy, culture, and society of contemporary Asia, including Pakistan and Afghanistan. Our publication highlights the works of young scholars alongside those of well-established experts, providing a valuable opportunity for graduate students to expand upon their academic portfolio.

Submissions will be considered on a rolling basis until January 31, 2022, so we encourage your students and colleagues to submit their manuscripts soon. All submissions should be 5,000-7,000 words in length. For more details on our formatting guidelines and expectations, please forward the attached “Instructions for Contributors” file or refer to the “Notice to Contributors” section on our website. For any points not addressed therein, we welcome questions and comments sent to our email (gjaa@georgetown.edu). Continue reading

Postwar Asian Management and Its Mediated Form–cfp

CFP: Postwar Asian Management and its Mediated Forms, seminar for the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) annual meeting (Taipei, June 15–18, 2022)
Organized by Hannah Airriess and Lawrence Zi-Qiao Yang
Submit an abstract: https://www.acla.org/postwar-asian-management-and-its-mediated-forms
Deadline: October 31, 2021

This seminar is interested in postwar media forms in the context of the period’s management theory as it became implemented as corporate practice in East Asia, during an era often said to be defined first by Japanese postwar reconstruction and then by Asian Tiger developmentalism. We wish to explore literary and visual narratives across media that take up questions regarding management in Asia since the end of World War II, with a particular eye toward understanding the way in which managerial organizational logics become manifest as aesthetic practices. To this end, we aim for an examination of both the textual articulation of managerial logics in aesthetic practices and forms as well as the organizational structures of systems and institutions that produce such media. In some cases, these practices revolve around emergent genre forms, as in white collar cinematic narratives produced during Japan’s high-growth era. In other cases, we are more interested in the material cultures that surround cultural products, like the propagandistic newsreels that were produced in Taiwan during the booming 1970s that would be played in theaters before feature films. Continue reading

Sixth Tone China Writing Contest

Sixth Tone China Writing Contest – Theme: “Generations”
Deadline: 11:59 pm (GMT), April 30, 2022

Each generation has a story to tell. Sixth Tone invites authors from across the globe to submit China-related nonfiction stories centering on the theme of “GENERATIONS.” An all-star panel of international judges including Fuchsia Dunlop, Howard W. French, Peter Hessler, Qian Jianan, Tabitha Speelman, Wu Qi, Xiang Biao, and Zhou Yijun will evaluate the finalists.

Deadline: 11:59 pm (GMT), April 30, 2022. Word limit: 1,000-5,000 words. Entry fee: none. CASH PRIZES: 10 prizes ranging from 3,000 to 50,000 yuan. Quality entries will also be considered for publication on Sixth Tone’s website or podcast. For more details: https://interaction.sixthtone.com/feature/2021/Writing-Contest/index.html

Posted by: Ting Wu fubm@sixthtone.com

ACLA Seminar on Literature and Media–cfp

CFP: Literature and Media, seminar for the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA) annual meeting (Taipei, June 15–18, 2022)
Organized by Renren Yang and Dylan Suher
Submit an abstract: https://www.acla.org/literature-and-media
Deadline: October 31, 2021

Two decades into the twenty-first century, this seminar will look to assess and use a comparative approach to expand the “media turn” in studies of literature. The configurations of literature represented by “new media” has prompted scholars both of contemporary literature and literature of earlier eras not only to emphasize transmedia modes of storytelling, but also to destabilize the very concept of “literature,” “film,” and the media form itself. In the wake of this turn, scholars have begun to scrutinize the role of the material and the technological in literary production, the convergence and divergence between the textual and the audiovisual media, and the renewed contentions over textual authority between writers, readers, and “mediators” (editors, reviewers, publishing houses, platforms, to name just a few). We hope that the ACLA conference in Taiwan will allow for a conversation about this research program that escapes the confines of the Anglophone. We want to think about institutions of literary and cultural production that extend across or were imported across oceans and transpacific/transatlantic networks of writers and readers. We are also interested in exploring transmedia assemblances and practices situated at the intersection of “late capitalism” and/or “post-socialism” (e.g., the legacies of state-managed transmedia assemblages of cultural production and consumption, and their engagement with the postmodern.) Continue reading