6th Critical Asian Humanities Workshop–cfp

Call for Papers: Sixth Annual Critical Asian Humanities Workshop (deadline, January 1, 2020)
Duke University
April 10-11, 2020

Duke University will host its sixth annual Critical Asian Humanities workshop on April 10-11, 2020. Integrating approaches and methodologies from cultural studies, critical theory, and area studies, we identify Critical Asian Humanities as an interdisciplinary field that emphasizes humanistic inquiry while critically interrogating many of the assumptions on which the humanities have traditionally relied.

The 2020 Workshop’s keynote speakers will be:

Michael Berry (UCL)
Shuang Shen (Penn State)
Keith Vincent (Boston University)
and with concluding remarks by Leo Ching (Duke)

The workshop will also feature papers by 6 graduate students, selected by a panel of Duke faculty and graduate students. Duke will cover the domestic travel and 3 days of room/board for the students who are invited to speak.

Although the workshop does not have a formal theme, preference will be given to graduate student papers that complement the keynote speakers’ focus on work that foregrounds questions of borders. Students working on Asia (including global Asia) in any discipline in the humanities or interpretive social sciences are welcome to apply.

Please send a 500-word abstract and brief biographical blurb to CAH-AMES@duke.edu by January 1, 2020. Queries may be addressed to carlos rojas (c.rojas@duke.edu).

Berkeley-Stanford Grad Conference–cfp reminder

Call for Proposals for the 2020 Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

Currently enrolled graduate students are invited to submit paper proposals for the Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities, to be held April 24-25, 2020 at UC Berkeley. Conference registration is free. Presenters will be provided with shared lodging, Friday dinner, and Saturday lunch. There is limited partial funding assistance for those who cannot find their own funding.

Proposals/bios due: November 22, 2019 (5:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time)

Application Instructions:

To apply, please upload your abstract and a short bio (not a full CV) as a one-page document.  For the abstract, include: Author Name, Main Title, Subtitle (optional), Keywords, and Abstract.  The short bio must be no more than one quarter of a page. Please follow the link to apply: https://ceas.stanford.edu/conferences/2020-berkeley-stanford-graduate-student-conference-modern-chinese-humanities Continue reading

EACS 2020–cfp reminder

Reminder: CALL FOR PAPERS: The 23rd Biennial Conference of the European Association for Chinese Studies (EACS 2020) – Deadline: 6 Jan 2020

As the end of 2019 is quickly approaching, we would like to remind those interested that the EACS 2020 papers and panels submission deadline is 6 January 2020, 6 pm CET.

The EACS 2020 will be held at Leipzig University (Germany) from 25 August 2020 to 29 August 2020. Local organisation is provided by the Institute of East Asian Studies, Leipzig University. The EACS biennial conference is the biggest Chinese Studies meeting in Europe, typically featuring between 400 and 500 paper presentations. Continue reading

Reassessing Chinese Independent Cinema–cfp

Reassessing Chinese Independent Cinema: Past, Present… and Future?
Conference, 5-6 June 2020
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne
Call for Paper Proposals

If Wu Wenguang’s Bumming in Beijing (流浪北京, 1990) is considered to mark the birth of independent cinema in the People’s Republic of China (hereafter China) that cinema will be celebrating its 30th birthday in 2020. But if independence is defined as meaning production without government permission, China’s first film law in 2017 was understood by many as making that practice illegal. The intervening decades saw the emergence of a broader film culture supporting this filmmaking, from film festivals to film criticism, but also this culture’s metamorphosis under pressure from both state and market. Can we still speak of independent cinema in the PRC, and if so, what does it mean to do so?

This seems to be a good moment to take stock of the past, present and future of Chinese independent film. We seek papers that address the current and future state of independent filmmaking in China, but also our understanding of this practice and its history. After thirty years, there is a significant body of literature on the subject, in a range of languages. What have we learned? What is missing? And what is still to be done? Continue reading

SEC AAS 2020–cfp deadline extension

Please note the deadline extension!

The 59th annual meeting of the Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies will be held January 17–19, 2020 at New College of Florida in the beautiful city of Sarasota by the Tampa Bay of Florida. The program committee welcomes proposals for individual or panel presentations from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars. Proposals must be submitted by November 20, 2019. Please submit panel submissions here and individual paper submissions here. Please direct any questions about proposal submission to our program chair, Professor Xia Shi (xshi@ncf.edu), and questions about conference logistics to our local arrangements chair Professor Fang-yu Li (fli@ncf.edu). More information can be found on our website, which is www.sec-aas.com. Continue reading

China India–cfp

Call For Papers
China India: Comparisons, Connections, Convergence
22nd Annual Comparative Literature Conference
March 26-28, 2020, The University of South Carolina

The emergent field of China India studies approaches the study of Asia in an integrated fashion, allowing scholars to exceed limits imposed by national boundaries. Engaging recent debates over world literature, global cinema, transnational history, the history and future of area studies programs, and cross-cultural anthropology, scholars engaged in China India studies examine connections and convergences between the two spaces. This conference, hosted by the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC, invites paper and panel submissions that put China and India into conversation. The conference will feature keynotes by Tansen Sen (NYU Shanghai), and Engseng Ho (Duke University). We welcome papers from various disciplines, including but not limited to comparative literature, film studies, anthropology, religious studies, history, and political science. Continue reading

AAS-in-Asia 2020–cfp

Call for Proposals
Hong Kong 2020
June 22-24, 2020

There is still time to submit. Two weeks remaining until the deadline

The Association for Asian Studies (AAS) in partnership with The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), are pleased to invite colleagues in Asian studies to submit proposals for Organized Panels, Roundtables and Workshops for consideration for the upcoming AAS-in-Asia 2020 Conference scheduled to take place June 22-24, 2020, The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Asianists interested in participating at  AAS-in-Asia 2020 Hong Kong may submit proposals via the electronic application. No Individual Papers will be considered for this conference.  The program committee seeks sessions that will engage panelists and audiences in the consideration of ideas, information, and interpretations that will advance knowledge about Asian regions and, by extension, will enrich teaching about Asia at all levels. AAS Membership is not a requirement for the submission of a proposal or participation.

Proposal Submission DeadlineThursday, October 31, 2019

All proposals should be submitted via the online abstract submission application link posted on the AAS website.  Please make sure to review ALL instructions and guidelines carefully prior to submitting a proposal.

Call for Proposals

Nostalgia from the West: China in Western Collections–cfp

Call For Papers
Nostalgia from the West: “China” in Western Collections
Date: May 22-25, 2020 Location: Guangzhou, China

Sponsor:

Boya College, Sun Yat-sen University
Advanced Institute for Humanities, Sun Yat-sen University
School of Art and Archaeology, Zhejiang University
Advanced Institute of Image and History, Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts

Organizer:

Advanced Institute for Humanities, Sun Yat-sen University
Advanced Institute of Image and History, Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts

Conference Theme:

Museum collections may be considered as ultimate presentations of a culture or nation to which the items belong. Therefore, visitors gain not only an aesthetic experience from artistic works and knowledge about the exhibits, but also understanding about the very culture or nation to which they belong.

For people living in Western societies, perceptions about non-Western cultures or nations is largely shaped by museum collections. Likewise, collected and displayed images of “China” play a significant role in the formation of knowledge about China. Based on an interweaved image of “civilization” and “politics” which are collected as well as exhibited in the West, understandings of China sometimes overlap with images of China conveyed through mass media, but sometimes they diverge, even conflicting with each other. The tensions between them invite further scrutiny. Continue reading

Revenge of the Remakes–cfp

Some colleagues here at BYU are editing a volume on remakes of 1950s sci fi films. They were interested in seeing if any there any colleagues in Chinese studies who might want to contribute a chapter. See the call for papers below.

Steve Riep <steven_riep@byu.edu>

REVENGE OF THE REMAKES: ADAPTATION AND INFLUENCE OF 195OS SCI FI FILMS
Call for Papers

Revenge of the Remakes: Adaptations and the Influence of 1950s Sci-Fi Films will be an edited collection of essays that will focus on the influence of 1950s science fiction films in later decades through direct and indirect adaptations. A great deal has been written about the sci-fi films of the 1950s, but much less has been written about how these films have been recycled, repurposed, and reused over the years. Continue reading

SEC-AAS 2020–cfp

The 59th annual meeting of the Southeast Conference of the Association for Asian Studies will be held January 17–19, 2020 at New College of Florida in the beautiful city of Sarasota by the Tampa Bay of Florida. The program committee welcomes proposals for individual or panel presentations from faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars. Proposals must be submitted by October 31, 2019. Please submit panel submissions here and individual paper submissions here. Please direct any questions about proposal submission to our program chair, Professor Xia Shi (xshi@ncf.edu), and questions about conference logistics to our local arrangements chair Professor Fang-yu Li (fli@ncf.edu). More information can be found on our website, which is www.sec-aas.com.

Best,

Fang-yu Li
Assistant Professor of Chinese Language and Culture
Division of Humanities
New College of Florida
941-487-4277

Critical Perspective on Chinese Infrastructures–cfp

Below is a brief CFP for a panel being organized by a colleague (Leif Johnson, University of Kentucky Dept. of Geography) and myself (Goeun Lee, University of Kentucky Dept. of Anthropology), for the upcoming Association for Asian Studies conference in Hong Kong, June 2020. We are looking for contributions from geographers and anthropologists doing research on or around topics including the construction, maintenance, planning, or discourse surrounding Chinese infrastructure, particularly within China.

Due to the structure of the AAS’ panel organization system, the deadline for panel proposals is quite soon, and we would hope to be able to have a clear idea of who will be participating by October 25th, which will give us time to submit requests for financial support for participants who need it, and draft a fleshed-out proposal to submit to AAS by the 30th of October. If you are interested, even with doubts about timing or funding, please get back to us as soon as possible! Continue reading

Berkeley-Stanford Grad Conference 2020–cfp

Call for Proposals for the 2020 Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

Currently enrolled graduate students are invited to submit paper proposals for the Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities, to be held April 24-25, 2020 at UC Berkeley. Conference registration is free. Presenters will be provided with shared lodging, Friday dinner, and Saturday lunch. There is limited partial funding assistance for those who cannot find their own funding.

Proposals/bios due: November 22, 2019 (5:00 p.m. Pacific Standard Time)

Application Instructions:

To apply, please upload your abstract and a short bio (not a full CV) as a one-page document.  For the abstract, include: Author Name, Main Title, Subtitle (optional), Keywords, and Abstract.  The short bio must be no more than one quarter of a page. Please follow the link to apply: https://ceas.stanford.edu/conferences/2020-berkeley-stanford-graduate-student-conference-modern-chinese-humanities Continue reading

Communication, Media, and Governance 2012–cfp

Call for Third Biennial Conference on Communication, Media, and Governance in the Age of Globalization

The National Communication Association (NCA) announces the Third Biennial Conference on Communication, Media, and Governance in the Age of Globalization, to be held on the Beijing campus of the Communication University of China (CUC), June 19-21, 2020. The conference seeks to foster greater understanding between and collaboration among Chinese scholars of Communication and a wide range of international colleagues affiliated with NCA.

For this event, we will be using the United Nation’s “Millennium Development Goals” (MDGs). Approved in 2000, and signed by all 191 UN members, the MDGs serve as benchmarks in human development, quality of life, and global partnership. The eight MDGs are:

  • To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger;
  • To achieve universal primary education;
  • To promote gender equality and empower women;
  • To reduce child mortality;
  • To improve maternal health;
  • To combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases;
  • To ensure environmental sustainability; and
  • To develop global partnerships for development.

Continue reading

Rethinking Modernity through Transculturality–cfp

CFP: Rethinking Modernity through Transculturality
ACLA 2020, March 19-22, Chicago
Deadline: Sep. 23 9am EST on ACLA portal

How was the idea of modernity or the modern conceptualized? According to Max Weber, it is originated from the secularization of Christianity, while for philosophers such as Nietzsche, it pertains to the Enlightenment reason and marks the rise of science and human rationality over theology and metaphysics. But more specifically, according to Peter Osborne, the term modernity is first and foremost a historical indicator derived from the distinction of the past as pre-modern. Contemporary scholars such as Fredric Jameson register the modern in the Marxist stages of revolution. The modern or modernity in this sense always subscribes to the temporal register. With the rise of anti-colonial consciousness and the prominent postcolonial criticism, the idea of the modern can no longer be limited to the temporal register. From the mid-twentieth century, a reflection over the conceptualization of the East-West has already been purported by Japanese scholars such as Takeuchi Yoshimi. In recent years, various efforts have been made at rethinking the issue of modernity and its relevant cultural and literary practices through border-crossing lenses, be it transcultural, transnational, transcontinental, global/world, etc. Continue reading

Translation as Reading–cfp

CFP: Translation as Reading (ACLA 2020)
ACLA 2020, March 19-22, Chicago
Seminar organizers: Junjie Luo and Eugene Eoyang

When Gayatri Spivak (1993) discusses “translation as reading,” she focuses on the relationship that a translator establishes with the original text and its translation. This seminar examines the role that reading plays in various aspects of translation. Following Spivak’s argument, this seminar welcomes papers that use the concept of reading to discuss the dynamics between texts and translators. How do different modes of reading influence translation strategies? What historical and cultural factors contribute to a translator’s understanding of the original text? We encourage contributors to use reading as a critical lens to compare cultures. For example, how does a translator’s interpretation of the source text reflect the cultural differences and the opportunities/challenges in cross-cultural communication? Continue reading