Spying on East Asia–cfp new deadline

Due to COVID-19 related concerns and uncertainties, “Spying on East Asia” conference has been postponed until Feb 27 – 28, 2021.  The new CFP deadline is September 15, 2020. Those who have already submitted a proposal do not need to resubmit.

Spying on East Asia: Intelligence and Surveillance in the Age of Information
Feb 27 – 28, 2021
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Washington University in St. Louis

This two-day conference will focus on secret agents and hidden control during hot, cold, and information wars in East Asia throughout the twentieth century to the present. Competition over information formed an invisible yet vitally important battlefield that had paramount effects on the war front in the first half of the twentieth century. Newly invented media technologies, such as radio, telegram, and tape recording, were mobilized to gather, reproduce, and disseminate intelligence. Secret agents and spies crossed institutional, regional, and national boundaries, destabilizing senses of truth and trust. The prevalence of the espionage genre in East Asia reflects the heightened political tension that persisted throughout the cold war, and also contributes to contemporary imaginations of wartime. Today, new technologies of surveillance and information control have largely reshaped people’s social experience and sense of security, raising pressing questions about power, privacy, and identity. Continue reading

Routledge Asia, Europe, and Global Connections series

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the Routledge Series “Asia, Europe, and Global Connections: Culture, History, and Trans-Area Studies.” This series, edited by Chunjie Zhang, Stefan Keppler-Tasaki, and Reto Hofmann, aims to publish innovative studies of connections and comparisons between Europe and Asia in all historical periods. We welcome contributions from all disciplines in the humanities and social sciences, including literary and cultural studies, history, political science, sociology, geography, gender studies. The aim is to provide a platform for the growing scholarship on Asia and Europe in a global context and the emerging field of trans-area studies.

Details about the series can be found at https://www.routledge.com/Asia-Europe-and-Global-Connections/book-series/AEC01

Chunjie Zhang <zhangchunjie2011@gmail.com>

Yan Lianke volume–cfp

We are seeking contributions to an edited volume focusing on Yan Lianke studies. We are pleased to announce the official Call for Papers, for your kind consideration. We look forward to your participation in this project.

The present edited volume focuses on how Yan Lianke has been received in and beyond mainland China, whilst presenting views of how Yan Lianke has been understood, interpreted, and appreciated in Japan, the US, and Europe.

Contributions are from renowned scholars worldwide. The volume will also include one or two articles written by Yan Lianke himself.

Significance of the Volume

Yan Lianke is by far the most prolific writer in present-day China as well as one of its most prominent avant-gardists. He is an author whose literary works have enjoyed an enormous readership and have caught much critical attention not only in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan but also in many other countries around the world. Continue reading

WICL-5

The 5th Workshop on Innovations in Cantonese Linguistics (WICL-5). organized at The Ohio State University, will be held as a synchronous webinar conference on April 18 (Saturday evening) and April 19 (Sunday morning), Eastern Daylight Time (EDT).  Registration is free and open to the public.

WICL-5 Website: https://u.osu.edu/wicl/wicl-5/
WICL-5 Program: https://u.osu.edu/wicl/wicl-5/program/
WICL-5 Online Registration: https://u.osu.edu/wicl/wicl-5/registration/

See you all virtually at WICL-5!

WICL-5 | WICL

New: WICL-5 as an online webinar conference! The 5th Workshop on Innovations in Cantonese Linguistics (WICL-5) will take place in April 2020, to be hosted by The Ohio State University, in Columbus, Ohio, U.S.A. In the interest of keeping everyone safe, the originally-planned on-site event will be replaced with a virtual, online event.

Marjorie Chan <chan.9@osu.edu>

Studies in Translation History–cfp

This e-mail is the call for submissions for the latest publication project “Book Series: Young Researchers’ Studies in Translation History” planned by the Research Centre for Translation, The Chinese University of Hong Kong. For more information, please click here.

本電郵為香港中文大學翻譯研究中心最新出版計劃「新芽翻譯史研究論叢」徵稿宣傳郵件。如未能看到以下內容,請點 此處

Spaces of Encounter (JCC) special issue–cfp

Call for Paper: Spaces of Encounter
Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Special Issue 2021

This special issue seeks innovative research that explores the many spaces in which cinema (broadly defined) is exhibited and encountered in China and the Sinophone world from the late nineteenth century to the present.

Where do we encounter cinema? As digital technologies transform the ways in which moving images are produced and consumed, they also call attention to the extent to which cinema has previously been defined and theorized through a specific exhibition space, namely, the movie theater. American film historian William Paul, for example, asks “if movies are no longer inescapably an art of the theater, have we lost an understanding of the art form that seemed self-evident to past audiences?” But in China and the Sinophone world, cinema was never bound up with the movie theater. From its first appearance in luxurious hotels and tea gardens, cinema has been exhibited in many venues alongside the commercial movie theater, such as classrooms, village squares, workers’ clubs, video halls (luxiang ting), museums, long-distance buses, and the living room. In addition, theme parks and tourist sites offer entry into filmed worlds through characters and landscapes. Large urban screens and personal mobile devices turn sidewalks, malls, and public transit into potential screening spaces (or what Francesco Casetti calls hypertopias). New digital spaces of exhibition afford users novel ways of interaction and performance, such as danmaku/danmu commentaries and the ability to easily create gifs from the video browser. Continue reading

Rearticulating Gender and Class in Postsocialist China

Dear friends,

AAS has been canceled. However, since my panelists and I do not want to miss this rare opportunity of intellectual exchanges we have decided to move our panel “Rearticulating Gender and Class in Postsocialist China: Women’s Literature as Method” online. We invite you to join us via Zoom on Mar 19 (Thursday) at 07:30 PM Eastern Time.

Presenters: Xueping Zhong, Ping Zhu, and Hui Xiao
Discussant: Tani Barlow

[Zoom link: https://oklahoma.zoom.us/j/782700295]
Please see the attached flyer for more information.

best,

Ping Zhu

Eileen Chang as World Literature–cfp

Call for Papers: MLA Annual Convention, January 7-10, 2021, in Toronto, Canada, “Eileen Chang as World Literature”

Eileen Chang (1920-1995), a Chinese woman writer, won her overnight success in 1940s cosmopolitan Shanghai. She left Shanghai in 1952 for Hong Kong in pursuit of literary freedom. In three years, she departed again for the United States, the center of the world after World War II. The trajectory of her writing career represents a microcosm of a theoretical problem of world literature. Through the Eileen Chang phenomenon in national and/or world literatures, we can investigate encounters, conflicts, and mediations between different cultures. This guaranteed session aims to develop the systematic nature of the relations between Eileen Chang and world literature as these have developed through sociopolitical climates, institutions, cultural migration, and individual intellectual activity on a global scale. Please send an approximately 250-word abstract and 200-word bio by March 15, 2020, to Dr. Sijia Yao (syao4@unl.edu).

Spying on East Asia–cfp

Spying on East Asia: Intelligence and Surveillance in the Age of Information
October 31-November 1, 2020
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Washington University in St. Louis

This two-day conference will focus on secret agents and hidden control during hot, cold, and information wars in East Asia throughout the twentieth century to the present. Competition over information formed an invisible yet vitally important battlefield that had paramount effects on the war front in the first half of the twentieth century. Newly invented media technologies, such as radio, telegram, and tape recording, were mobilized to gather, reproduce, and disseminate intelligence. Secret agents and spies crossed institutional, regional, and national boundaries, destabilizing senses of truth and trust. The prevalence of the espionage genre in East Asia reflects the heightened political tension that persisted throughout the cold war, and also contributes to contemporary imaginations of wartime. Today, new technologies of surveillance and information control have largely reshaped people’s social experience and sense of security, raising pressing questions about power, privacy, and identity. Continue reading

Pedagogy of Chinese Film–cfp

In recent years, the humanities and social sciences have witnessed a fast-growing presence of pedagogical practices with moving images across a wide range of fields. Along with the ever-changing film studies curriculum, films have been used in diverse ways to, among other purposes, increase learning motivation and engagement; provide cognitive facilities for theoretical concepts; present complex and subtle information as analytical materials; and simulate an experience with unfamiliar, underrepresented, or difficult-to-reach subjects. At the same time, there are scholars and instructors who caution against using film for teaching, especially when the subject is projected as an “other” on screen, because they are concerned about its potential to create negative emotional tension; blur the boundary between reality and representation; and generate false, distorted, or simplistic understanding of real-world complexity. Continue reading

HK Studies Association 2020–cfp

The Hong Kong Studies Association invites papers for its inaugural conference on Friday 15 May 2020 held at the University of Westminster, Regent Street, London.

The one-day conference, organised by the Centre for the Study of Democracy and the Contemporary China Centre, University of Westminster and the Department of Politics, University of Surrey, will feature panels on the ongoing crises in the territory, the shape and future of Hong Kong studies in the UK, LGBT and gender issues, and cutting-edge research by PhD students working on Hong Kong.

We invite papers on Hong Kong by current postgraduate students from disciplines including, but not limited to, the Arts and Humanities, Social Science and Law. Please send a 150 word abstract to conference.hksa@gmail.com by 27 March 2020. Invited speakers will be notified on 24 April 2020 and receive a nominal travel subsidy of 25 GBP.

If you have any questions, please contact conference.hksa@gmail.com.

Kind regards,

HKSA Conference Team

ANZJA–cfp

I-Chen KUO, ‘33.5 degrees N, 33.3 degrees E’, from the series ‘Survivor’, 2007, digital print. Courtesy of the artist.

Call for Papers – Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art (ANZJA), vol. 21, issue 1
Reconfiguring the World: The Art of Greater China and its Diasporas
350 word abstract, due 31 March 2020
Final Submissions Due: 10 July 2020
Editors: Associate Professor Claire Roberts and Dr Mark Erdmann

This special issue of the ‘Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art’ seeks papers that examine the art of the Greater China region encompassing mainland China, Macao, Hong Kong and Taiwan as well as that of diasporic artists working in different contexts around the world. Greater China is understood as an active cultural space defined by historical, multi-directional flows of people and ideas rather than territorial boundaries, and the Chinese diaspora connects China to all parts of the world. By recovering forgotten or marginalised histories of artworks, artists’ lives, art networks, and exhibitions, it is possible to consider alternatives to monolithic national narratives and reconfigure the field of “Chinese” art history in more complex and connected ways. Continue reading

Sinophone Literature in the Global South–cfp

Call for Papers: Sun Yat-sen Journal of Humanities (ISSN: 1024-3631)
Special Issue: Sinophone Literature in the Global South

Guest Editors:

Min-xu Zhan, Assistant Professor of the Graduate Institute of Taiwan Literature and Transnational Cultural Studies, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan
Chia-rong Wu, Senior Lecturer of the Global, Cultural and Language Studies, The University of Canterbury, New Zealand

The discourse of Sinophone literature is two-fold in the network of the Global South. First, it is common to see in traditional Chinese history such expressions as “southern barbarians” and “South Seas,” both of which have long been employed to imagine and portray the Chinese south. From a Chinese perspective, Sinophone literature in the Global South refers to the literary production of the South beyond mainland China. To be more specific, the field includes Sinophone writing produced in the southern regions, including Southeast Asia, Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan. In recent years, the horizon of the Chinese literary study has been expanded in response to world Chinese literature and Sinophone literature within the framework of the Global South. Current scholarship not only recognizes the geographical distinctiveness between the north and south in Chinese literary production, but it also highlights the unique features of the literary south with respect to the colonial history, multiethnic exchange, and cultural practices of the local community. Continue reading

Read China–cfp

Call for papers: Practices of Reading in the People’s Republic of China
Freiburg (Germany), Dec. 9-11, 2020

Research into literary and intellectual life typically focuses on analyses of texts and their production. The reader, practices of reading and the meanings and interpretations that (ordinary) readers arrive at very often are missing from the picture. This conference aims at filling this gap in research by focusing on practices of reading in the People’s Republic of China.

The conference “Practices of Reading in the People’s Republic of China” is hosted by the ERC-funded project ‘The Politics of Reading in the People’s Republic of China (READCHINA)’. READCHINA investigates into the politics and practices of reading in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), their interpretation and their impact on social and intellectual change. The main objective is a reinvestigation of literary history, intellectual history and cultural policy of the PRC from the perspective of the ordinary reader, who time and again aimed at testing or transgressing the boundaries of the rigid system. READCHINA includes research on fictional figures in popular literature; audiences of entertainment Internet fiction; organized forms and participants’ responses at rituals of collective reading participants; anonymous bookstore frequenters; and second-hand book readers and dealers. We explore reading as a tactic of common readers from the grassroots. Continue reading

Global Storytelling

Global Storytelling
January 28 -30, 2020
CVA1022 Communication and Visual Arts Building
Hong Kong Baptist University 5 Hereford Road Kowloon Tong HK

The symposium explores the affect and effect of storytelling across regional borders, platforms, and genres including narrative features and documentaries, serial and series dramas on network TV, Netflix, & HBO, narratives on podcast and radio programs, long narrative video journalism and short format video/personal essays on YouTube, and other online platforms. The symposium serves as a platform for the launch a new academic journal: Global Storytelling: Journal of Film and Moving Image. Housed in the School of Communication at the Hong Kong Baptist University with Professor Ying Zhu serving as the founding editor, the journal will be published by the University of Michigan Press.

Symposium Chair
Professor Ying Zhu
Director, Centre for Film and Moving Image Research FMIR
Academy of Film School of Communication Hong Kong Baptist University Continue reading