Licking County Master Gardener Open House and Summer Programs

The Master Gardener Volunteers have been very busy this year.  They are hosting a Garden Open House on July 17th,  from 10-2.  In addition they are having Mornings in the Garden events once a month, sessions at the Canal Market twice a month, and Lawn Chair Learning lessons once a month.  Details for all of these can be found by clicking on this link.  2021 events brochure

Grazing and Forage Field Day in Licking County

Extension in Licking and Knox Counties are teaming together with the Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council to provide a drive it yourself tour of two locations in Licking County and one in Knox County.  Our tour will begin at Lightning Ridge Farm in Granville where Bill O’Neill raises Longhorn cattle utilizing intensive grazing. With twelve divided lots and the capability to increase divisions into twenty-four paddocks, cattle are moved daily and have access to portable piped water. We will also discuss the value of hay quality preservation while touring a new hoop barn constructed for hay storage. The second stop in the tour will move six miles north to a field managed by Ned Campbell who has provided space to plant about twelve varieties of forages following wheat harvest. Attendees will be able to observe and discuss the value of these forages for grazing or harvesting. For the final stop, we will move further north into Knox county to learn about the use of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) approved warm-season grass production. This field day will begin at 6817 Cat Run Rd. Granville, OH 43023 at 11:00 a.m. and conclude at 3:00 p.m.

There is a $10 registration fee per person. Lunch is included with registration. A $5 discount will be applied if the person registering is an OFGC Member or a resident of the host county. Payment will be collected at the field day. Please register within one week of the event you plan to attend by completing a quick registration form here.

Questions about the Summer Forage Field Day can be directed to Gary Wilson by calling 419-348-3500, Dean Kreager 740-618-6332, or Sabrina Schirtzinger 740-397-0401 .

“Assessing the Health of Your Woods” July 9 virtual program

By David Apsley

Our July 9th program will be held virtually and will touch on a wide range of woodland health issues ranging from  insects and diseases (both native and non-native) to a lack of desirable regeneration in the understory.  The program will focus on  the benefits of and how to use the “HealthyWoods” phone app which was developed by University of Kentucky and University of Tennessee Extension in cooperation with Ohio State University and other extension programs in the eastern US https://healthywoodsapp.org/.   This new resources was developed to help you to quickly and easily identify common issues facing your woodland.

Our featured presenter will be Ellen Crocker, Ph.D. a  Forest Health Extension Specialist  from the University of Kentucky.  Ellen was instrumental in the development of this useful resource for woodland owners.

We highly recommend downloading HealthyWoods from your app. store prior to the program.  It is available in both Android and iOS.

This program will take place from 10AM to Noon on July 9.  Click here to register

 

Mysterious Bird Illness Strikes Ohio

Hello Wild Side Readers!

Have you seen or heard about an illness in Ohio affecting songbirds? If so, the attached handout has some information on the mysterious disease. At this time, biologists are unclear as to what is causing birds to get sick, but diagnostic laboratories, including the National Wildlife Health Center, are on the case. Check out the below publication for more information and what you can do to help.

In addition, the Ohio Division of Wildlife has created a new webpage for sharing updates and easy access to their reporting websites.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Going on with the Birds? Mysterious Illness Affecting Ohio Birds

 

Marne Titchenell

Wildlife Program Specialist

Ohio legislature passes solar and wind project siting and approval bill

It’s been a long and winding road to the Governor’s desk for Senate Bill 52, the controversial bill on siting and approval of large-scale wind and solar facilities in Ohio.  The bill generated opposition and concern from the outset, requiring a major overhaul early on.  A substitute bill passed the Senate on June 2 after six hearings and hundreds of witnesses testifying for and against the bill.  It took the House five hearings to pass a further revised version of the bill earlier this week, and the Senate agreed to those revisions the same day.  Now the bill awaits Governor DeWine’s action.  If the Governor signs the bill, it would become effective in 90 days.

S.B. 52 generates conflicting opinions on property rights and renewable energy.  It would grant counties and townships a voice in the siting and approval of large-scale wind and solar projects, allowing a community to go so far as to reject facility applications and prohibit facilities in identified restricted areas of the county.  Supporters of the bill say that new local authority would allow local residents to protect their individual property rights as well as the fate of the community.  On the other side, opponents claim that the bill interferes with the property rights of those who want to lease their land for solar and wind development and unfairly subjects renewable energy to stricter controls than other energy projects.

The bill itself is lengthy and a bit tedious but we’ve organized it into the following summary.  An important first step is to understand the types of projects subject to the law, so we begin with the definitions section of the bill.

Definitions – Ohio Revised Code 303.57

The bill defines several key terms used to identify the types of wind and solar projects and applications that would be subject to the new law:

  • “Economically significant wind farm” means wind turbines and associated facilities with a single interconnection to the electrical grid and designed for, or capable of, operation at an aggregate capacity of five or more megawatts but less than fifty megawatts, excluding any such wind farm in operation on June 24, 2008 and one or more wind turbines and associated facilities that are primarily dedicated to providing electricity to a single customer at a single location and that are designed for, or capable of, operation at an aggregate capacity of less than twenty megawatts, as measured at the customer’s point of interconnection to the electrical grid.
  • “Large wind farm” means an electric generating plant that consists of wind turbines and associated facilities with a single interconnection to the electrical grid that is a “major utility facility.”
  • “Large solar facility” means an electric generating plant that consists of solar panels and associated facilities with a single interconnection to the electrical grid that is a major utility facility.
  • “Utility facility” means all of the above.
  • “Major utility facility” means (a) electric generating plant and associated facilities designed for, or capable of, operation at a capacity of fifty megawatts or more, (and also includes certain electric transmission lines and gas pipelines).
  • “Material amendment” means an amendment to an existing utility facility certificate that changes its generation type, increases its nameplate capacity or changes the boundaries outside existing boundaries or that increase the number or height of wind turbines.

 

Designation of utility facility restricted areas in a county – ORC 303.58 and ORC 303.59

The bill would allow the county commissioners to designate “restricted areas” within the unincorporated parts of the county where economically significant wind farms, large wind farms, and large solar facilities may not be constructed.

  • The commissioners may take this action at a regular or special meeting.
  • The commissioners must give public notice of the meeting and proposed restricted areas at least 30 days prior, including to all townships, school districts and municipalities within the proposed restricted areas.
  • The restricted area designations shall not apply to utility facilities that were not prohibited by the commissioners in the county review under ORC 303.61, described below.
  • The restricted area designations become effective 30 days after the commissioners adopt the resolution unless a petition for referendum, described below, is presented to the commissioners within 30 days of adoption.
  • Once effective, a restricted area designation prohibits anyone from filing an application for a certificate or a material amendment to an existing certificate to construct, operate or maintain a utility facility in the restricted area.

 

Referendum on designation of utility facility restricted areas – ORC 303.59

If a county approves a restricted area, the bill sets up a referendum procedure to allow voters to have a say in the designation.  Residents may file a petition for referendum and request the county commissioners to submit the designation of a utility facility restricted area to a vote of the electors in the county.

  • At least 8% of the total vote cast for governor in the most recent election must sign the petition.
  • The petition must be presented to the commissioners within 30 days of the resolution adopted to designate the restricted areas.
  • Within two weeks of receiving the petition and no less than 90 days prior to the election, the county commissioners must certify the petition to the county board of elections, who must verify the validity of the petition.
  • The utility facility restricted area designation must be submitted to electors for approval or rejection at a special election on the day of the next primary or general election that occurs at least 120 days after the petition is filed.
  • If a majority of the vote is in favor of the restricted area designation, the designation shall be effective immediately.

 

County review of proposed wind and solar utility facilities — ORC 303.61

Local residents and officials have expressed concerns that they’re the last to know of a proposed large-scale wind or solar development proposed for their community.  Under the bill, utility facilities must hold a public meeting in each county where the facility will be located within 90 to 300 days prior to applying for or making a material amendment to an application for a certificate from the Ohio Power Siting Board.

  • The facility applicant must give a 14 day advance written notice of the public meeting to the county commissioners and to trustees of townships in which facility would be located.
  • At the meeting, the facility applicant must present in written form the type of utility facility, its maximum nameplate capacity, and a map of its geographic boundaries.
  • Up to 90 days after the public meeting, the county commissioners may adopt a resolution that prohibits the construction of the facility or limits its boundaries to a smaller part of the proposed location.  If the county commissioners do not prohibit or limit the facility, the applicant may proceed with the application.

 

Ohio Power Siting Board Composition – ORC 4906.021 to ORC 4906.025

The bill also responds to concerns that community members do not have a voice in the facility approval process overseen by Ohio’s Power Siting Board (OPSB).  For every utility facility application or material amendment to an application, the bill would require the OPSB to include two voting “ad hoc” members on the board to represent residents in the area where the facility is proposed.

  • The ad hoc members shall be the chair of the township trustees and the president of the county commissioners in the township and county of the proposed location, or their elected official or resident designees, or a trustee and commissioner chosen by a vote of the trustees and commissioners if the application affects multiple townships and counties.
  • An ad hoc member or the member’s immediate family members cannot have an interest in a lease or easement or any other beneficial interest with the applicant utility facility and cannot be an intervenor or have an immediate family member who is an intervenor in the OPSB proceeding.
  • The ad hoc members must be designated no more than 30 days after the county or township is notified by the OPSB that the application has been submitted and meets statutory requirements.
  • An ad hoc member may not vote on a resolution by its county commissioners or township trustees to intervene in the application proceeding.
  • An ad hoc member is exempt from restrictions on ex parte communications with parties in the case but must disclose the date and participants of ex parte conversations and shall not disclose or use confidential information acquired in the course of official duties.

 

OPSB Authority – ORC 4901.101; ORC 4906.30

There are parameters in the bill for projects that the OPSB may not approve.  The OPSB may not grant a certificate for the construction, operation, and maintenance of or material amendment to an existing certificate for a utility facility in these situations:

  • If the utility facility is prohibited by a restricted area designation.
  • If the county commissioners have prohibited the utility facility by resolution.
    • Where the utility facility would be in multiple counties, the OPSB must modify a certificate to exclude the area of a county whose commissioners prohibited the facility.
  • For any areas outside the boundaries of the utility facility that were changed by action of the county commissioners.
  • If the facility has a nameplate capacity exceeding the capacity provided to the county commissioners, has a geographic area not completely within the boundaries provided to the county commissioners, or is a different type of generation than that provided to the county commissioners.

 

Decommissioning Plans for Utility Facilities – ORC 4906.21 to ORC 4906.212

The question of what happens to a facility when its production life ends has been another issue of voiced concern.  The bill establishes decommissioning procedures for facilities.  At least 60 days prior to commencement of construction of a utility facility, an applicant must submit a decommissioning plan for review and approval by the OPSB.

  • A state registered professional engineer must prepare the plan, and the OPSB may reject the selected engineer.
  • The plan must include:
    • A list of parties responsible for decommissioning of the utility facility.
    • A schedule of decommissioning activities, which cannot extend more than 12 months beyond the date the utility facility ceases operation.
    • Estimates of the full cost of decommissioning, including proper disposal of facility components and restoration of the land on which the facility is located to its pre-construction state, but not including salvage value of facility materials.
      • The estimate of the full cost of decommissioning a utility facility must be recalculated every five years by an engineer retained by the applicant.

 

Performance Bonds – ORC 4906.22 to ORC 4906.222

How to and who pays for facility decommissioning is also addressed in the bill.  Before beginning construction of a utility facility, the applicant must post a performance bond to ensure that funds are available for the decommissioning of the facility.

  • The utility facility must name the OPSB as the bond oblige.
  • The bond shall equal the estimate of decommissioning costs included in the facility’s decommissioning plan.
  • The bond shall be updated every five years according to the most recent costs of decommissioning the facility and shall increase if estimated costs increase but shall not decrease if estimated costs decrease.

 

OPSB Provision of Approved Application — ORC 4906.31

Under the bill, local governments would formally know if a project receives OPSB approval.  The OPSB must provide a complete copy of an approved application for or material amendment to a certificate to each board of trustees and county commissioners in the townships and counties of the facility location.

  • The copy must be provided within 3 days of the OPSB’s acceptance of the application and filing fee payment by the applicant.
  • The copy may be in electronic or paper form.

 

Effect on Utility Facility Applications in Process – Sections 3, 4 and 5 of the Act

Many wind and solar facility projects are currently in process, so the bill addresses what happens to those projects should the law go into effect.

  • The new law would apply to all applications for a certificate or a material amendment to an existing certificate for an economically significant wind farm or large wind farm that is not accepted by the OPSB within 30 days after the effective date of the legislation.
    • An application for an economically significant wind farm or large wind farm that is not approved within 30 days after the effective date would be subject to review by the county commissioners, who would have 90 days after the effective date to review the application and act according to the provisions of the new law.
  • If an application for a certificate or material amendment to a certificate for a utility facility has not been accepted by the OPSB as of the new law’s effective date, the OPSB must include “ad hoc” members in further OPSB proceedings on the application.
  • The new law would not apply to an application for a certificate or material amendment to a certificate for a large solar facility that, as of the effective date of the new law, is in the new services queue of the PJM interconnection and regional transmission organization at the time the application is accepted by OPSB and the applicant has received a completed system impact study from PJM and paid its filing fee.
    • If the facility has multiple positions in the PJM new services queue, all queue position in effect on the law’s effective date are exempt from the new law.
    • If the facility submits a new queue position for an increase in its capacity interconnection rights, the change shall not subject the facility to the new law as long as the facility’s nameplate capacity does not increase.

We’ll keep an eye on the Governor to learn where S.B. 52’s road will end.  Read the full text of S.B. 52 and further information about it on the Ohio General Assembly’s website.

Continue reading

Farm Service Agency Now Accepting Nominations for County Committee Members

 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) began accepting nominations for county committee members on June 15. Elections will occur in certain Local Administrative Areas (LAA) for these members who make important decisions about how federal farm programs are administered locally. All nomination forms for the 2021 election must be postmarked or received in the local FSA office by Aug. 2, 2021.

Agricultural producers who participate or cooperate in a USDA program, and reside in the LAA that is up for election this year, may be nominated for candidacy for the county committee. A cooperating producer is someone who has provided information about their farming or ranching operation to FSA, even if they have not applied or received program benefits. Individuals may nominate themselves or others and qualifying organizations may also nominate candidates. USDA encourages minority producers, women and beginning farmers or ranchers to nominate, vote, and hold office.

Nationwide, more than 7,700 dedicated members of the agricultural community serving on FSA county committees. The committees are made up of three to 11 members who serve three-year terms. Producers serving on FSA county committees play a critical role in the day-to-day operations of the agency. Committee members are vital to how FSA carries out disaster programs, as well as conservation, commodity and price support programs, county office employment and other agricultural issues.

LAAs are elective areas for FSA committees in a single county or multi-county jurisdiction. This may include LAAs that are focused on an urban or suburban area.

Producers should contact their local FSA office today to register and find out how to get involved in their county’s election. They should check with their local USDA Service Center to see if their LAA is up for election this year. To be considered, a producer must be registered and sign an FSA-669A nomination form or an FSA-669-A-3 for urban county committees. The form and other information about FSA county committee elections are available at fsa.usda.gov/elections.

Election ballots will be mailed to eligible voters beginning Nov. 1, 2021. To find your local USDA Service Center, visit farmers.gov/service-locator

Registration is Open for the OFGC 2021 Summer Forage Field Days including stops in Licking and Knox counties

Christine Gelley, OSU Extension Educator ANR, Noble County

The Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council cordially invites you to join forage and livestock enthusiasts from across the state for their 2021 Summer Forage Field Days. Anyone with an interest in pasture management, hay production, or livestock systems is welcome to attend one or all of the field days planned as drive-it-yourself day tours in Central Ohio.

The series will begin June 25, 2021 in Crawford County. Finishing sheep, goats, and cattle on forage will be the topic of this field day and will include a stop on storing wet forages. This program will feature a tour in the morning of a grazing goat operation at H&M Family Farm with Mike & Angie Hall. Guests- Bob Hendershot, John Berger, and Mark Sulc will discuss finishing sheep, goats, and steers on forage. After lunch we will travel to a second farm to view alternative forage storage methods. At this stop we discuss baleage and methods to prevent barn fires. The Crawford County field day will begin at 980 Brokensword Rd. Sycamore, OH 44882 at 11:00 a.m. and conclude at 3:00 p.m.

On July 9, 2021, the series will continue in Wayne County. Improving soil with multi-species grazing and accelerated lambing will be the themes of the day. We will begin at Lone Pine Pastures with Jeff & Michelle Ramseyer who raise Katahdin sheep, Shorthorn beef cattle, pastured hogs, meat goats, and custom graze stocker calves. Along with pasture management, scrapie eradication continues to be a topic of importance for American sheep and goat producers. Over lunch we will review the importance of scrapie tagging and tag options approved for use in Ohio with Brady Campbell, Ph.D., OSU Department of Animal Sciences. After lunch we will travel to the farm of Leroy Kuhns to learn more about the use of accelerated lambing with registered Dorset sheep and corn, oats, and hay production for horses. The Wayne County field day is offered with support from the Ohio Sheep and Wool Program, Ohio Sheep Improvement Association, and the American Sheep Industry Association. We especially encourage early-career shepherds to attend this event. The field day will begin at 1689 Varns Rd. Wooster, OH 44691 at 11:00 a.m. and conclude at 4:00 p.m.

Our third Summer Forage Field Day will take place on August 28, 2021 with stops in Licking and Knox Counties. Our tour will begin at Lightning Ridge Farm in Granville where Bill O’Neill raises Longhorn cattle utilizing intensive grazing. With twelve divided lots and the capability to increase divisions into twenty-four paddocks, cattle are moved daily and have access to portable piped water. We will also discuss the value of hay quality preservation while touring a new hoop barn constructed for hay storage. The second stop in the tour will move six miles north to a field managed by Ned Campbell who has provided space to plant twelve varieties of forages following wheat harvest. Attendees will be able to observe and discuss the value of these forages for grazing or harvesting. For the final stop, we will move further north into Knox county to learn about the use of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) approved warm-season grass production. This field day will begin at 6817 Cat Run Rd. Granville, OH 43023 at 11:00 a.m. and conclude at 3:00 p.m.

There is a $10 registration fee per field day per person. Lunch is included with registration and will be provided at each field day. A $5 discount will be applied if the person registering is an OFGC Member or a resident of the host county. Payment will be collected at the field day. Please register within one week of the event you plan to attend by completing a quick registration form here.

Questions about the Summer Forage Field Days can be directed to Gary Wilson by calling 419-348-3500.

The Summer Forage Field Day series is a collaborative event planned by members of the Ohio Forage and Grasslands Council, Ohio State University Extension Staff, the USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Ohio Federation of Soil and Water Conservation Districts, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture.

We look forward to seeing you out in the field this summer!

Sheep 101 Field Day

OSU Extension –Morrow County and Morrow County Farm Bureau are offering a FREE small ruminant field day for local sheep producers. The program is set up for beginning and experienced producers.

Date:  Saturday, August 14
Time:  9:00 a.m. –2:30 p.m.
Location:  Dale and Cathy Davis Farm
3149 County Road 169
Cardington, Ohio 43315

Please RSVP by July 31 to Morrow County Farm Bureau 419-747-7488 or morrow.ofbf.org

Topics include:

  • Labor Saving Time Tricks
  • Shearing
  • Vaccinations
  • Scrapie eradication
  • Lambing Simulator
  • Experienced Producer Q&A

The sessions will be taught by OSU Extension Educators and industry professionals. Lunch will be provided.Funding for the program is provided by OSIA, OSWP and ASI.

Click here for the flyer with more details: Sheep 101 Field Day Flyer

Summer is a good time for a youth labor checkup

Farm Office Blog

Summer is a good time for a youth labor checkup

Monday, June 14th, 2021

Written by Peggy Kirk Hall, Associate Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law

Written by Peggy Kirk Hall and Jeffrey K. Lewis

School is out and youth employment is in.  As more and more youth turn to the job market during summer break, now is a good time to review the laws that apply to youth working in agricultural situations.  Here’s a quick refresher that can help you comply with youth employment laws.  For additional details and explanation, refer to our law bulletin on “Youth Labor on the Farm: Laws Farmers Need to Know.

  1. The agricultural “exemption” applies only to your children and grandchildren.  Many farmers know that there are unique exemptions for agricultural employers when it comes to employment law.  Youth employment is no different.  In Ohio, youth employment laws do not apply to children working on a farm owned or operated by their parent, grandparent, or legal guardian.   This means that your children, grandchildren, and legal guardianship children working on farms you own or operate may perform tasks that are considered “hazardous,” receive a wage less than federal and state minimum wage and work longer hours.  Keep in mind that this exemption does not apply to youth who are your cousins, nieces, nephews, and other extended family members—those family members are subject to youth employment laws.
  2. Lawn mowing and similar tasks are special.  Ohio Revised Code § 4109.06(9) explicitly states that youth engaged in “lawn mowing, snow shoveling, and other related employment” are not subject to Ohio’s youth employment laws.  This means that farms may hire youth to mow the grass and do similar tasks around the farm without having to comply with labor laws regarding working hours and wage requirements.
  3. Treat youth like adults for verification, workers compensation and taxes.  The law doesn’t deal with youth uniquely when it comes to Form I-9 employment verification, workers compensation coverage, and withholding taxes.  A farm employer must complete these same requirements for youth employees.
  4. Don’t start them too young.  Minimum working age is a tricky area of law.  Federal law allows youth under the age of 14 to be employed as long as certain requirements are met, such as having written parental consent and limiting work hours and tasks.  States may preempt federal law by being more restrictive.  Ohio law, however, doesn’t address youth under 14 and doesn’t explicitly permit or prohibit them from being employed.  Be aware that the Ohio Department of Commerce has stated that it interprets this silence in Ohio law as a prohibition against employing youth under 14.  This creates a compliance risk for employers who want to employ a youth under 14, as Ohio may deem that a violation of state law.  Before hiring youth under 14 for jobs other than the specifically exempted tasks of lawn mowing, snow shoveling or similar work, consult with your attorney.
  5. Keep younger youth away from “hazardous” jobs.  State and federal laws are clear on this point:  youth under the age of 16 cannot perform “hazardous” tasks.  This restriction includes operating heavy machinery with moving parts, working inside silos and manure pits, handling toxic chemicals, working with breeding livestock, sows and newborn calves, and other dangerous tasks.  An exception is that 14- and 15-year-olds may operate tractors and other machinery if they have a valid 4-H or vocational agricultural certificate of completion for safe tractor and machine operation.  See the complete list of prohibited hazardous tasks in our law bulletin on “Youth Labor on the Farm: Laws Farmers Need to Know.
  6. Don’t make them work too early or too late.  During the summer months, youth between 16 and 18 years of age may work as early or as late as needed.  Youth under the age of 16, however, may not start work before 7 am or work past 9 pm.
  7. Give the kids a break.  If youth are working longer hours, you must give them a break from working.  All youth under the age of 18 must receive a 30-minute break for every 5 hours worked.
  8. Know how much to pay.  If a farm grossed less than $323,000 in 2020, the employer must pay employees the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. If the farm grossed more than $323,000 then the employer must pay employees the Ohio minimum wage of $80.  Two exemptions allow a farmer to pay less than both the federal and state minimum wage to youth.  If the farm is owned or operated by a youth’s parent, grandparent, or legal guardian the minimum wage requirements do not apply.  Second, if the farm is a “small farm,” which means that the farm did not use more than 500 man-days of agricultural labor during any calendar quarter of the preceding year, then the farm is not required to pay the federal or state minimum wage to any youth employed on the farm.
  9. Sign a wage agreement.  This requirement catches many employers off guard.  Ohio law requires that before any youth can begin work, the youth and the employer must sign a wage agreement.  Be sure to keep this signed agreement with the youth’s employment records.  A sample wage agreement from the Ohio Department of Commerce is available here.
  10. Do your recordkeeping.  Just as you would with other employees, maintain a file on each of your youth employees.    The file should include the youth’s full name, permanent address, and date of birth, the youth’s wage agreement, and any 4-H or vocational agricultural certificates.  Also keep time slips, payroll records, parental consent forms, and name and contact information of youth’s parent or legal guardian..

Summer is a hot time to employ our youth and school them about farming and farm-related businesses.  But don’t let legal compliance ruin your summer fun.  If you have youth working on the farm and have concerns about any of the items in this quick overview, be sure to talk with your attorney.  Doing so will ensure that the summer job is a good experience for both you and your young employees.

 

 

Fish to Fork: Grilling in the Great Lakes

I thought this might interest some of people who enjoy fishing.

Join the Great Lakes Aquaculture Collaborative and Ohio Sea Grant for a webinar about seafood safety, grilling tips, and demonstrations of seafood prep and grilling at home using seafood grown in Great Lakes aquaculture!

Preparing fish at home may seem intimidating, but you can do it! Seafood is an important and nutritious source of protein we can all benefit from in our diets. This webinar will show you how to choose, prepare and grill seafood kebabs using trout, catfish and shrimp so you can take advantage of great seafood in the Great Lakes. You’ll also learn important food safety information, from buying, storing and preparing fish and other seafood safely to putting away your leftovers properly.

For more information and to register click this link http://go.osu.edu/FishToFork