2018 Knox County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Classes

2018 Knox County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Classes

Beginners Beekeeping Class 1 Beginner Beekeeping Class 2
Date: February 10, 2018 Date: February 24, 2018
Cost: $45 per person Cost: $45 per person 
*Lunch will be provided *Lunch will be provided
*Book included: “First Lessons in Beekeeping” *KCBA Advanced Manual included
*Free membership to Knox County Beekeepers Association
*Free one-year membership to the Ohio State Beekeepers Association

Classes Location: Hunter Hall, 211 South Main St., Mt. Vernon, OH 43050
Mount Vernon Nazarene University, Hunter Hall and The location of the Happy Bean Coffee Shop
PLEASE REGISTER BY: February 5, 2018 to Jeff Gabric: 515-450-1359
Students are free but must register.

Beginners Beekeeping Class ONE                                                  Beginner Beekeeping Class TWO
February 10th, 2018                                                                             February 24th, 2018
8:00 to 9:00 Registration Coffee and Donuts                                       Registration Coffee And Donuts
9:00 – 9:15       So You Want to Become a Beekeeper?                        Hive Inspections
9:15 – 9:45       What You Need to Get Started                                        Hive Management       
9:45 – 10:00     Hive Parts and Accessories                                           Over-Wintering Bees
10:00 -10:15    Break                                                                                Break
10:15 -10:45    Where to Get Bees                                                              Honey Bee Biology
10:45 -11:00    How to Install Bees                                                            Dealing with Varroa Mites and SHB
11:00 -11:30    How to Begin Working with Bees                                Re-queening a Colony
11:30 -12:30    Lunch                                                                                 Lunch
12:30 -12:45    Choosing a Location.                                                        Making Increases and Nucs
12:45 -1:00      Sources of Bees                                                                   Swarm Prevention
1:00 – 1:30      Honey Bee Biology                                                             Honey Production       
1:30 – 1:45      Break                                                                                  Break
1:45- 2:45        Now What? Putting it all Together                              Laying Workers and Merging
2:45 – 3:00       Round-table discussion                                                 Feeding Bees

SEE US AT: www.knoxbees.com

2018 Southern Ohio Specialty Crop Conference

Southern Ohio Specialty Crop Conference, February 6, 2017

This is an excellent conference for specialty crop growers. We have held a grower school in Southwest Ohio for over 30 years, but a few years ago we changed the location and expanded the course offering. There are 25 different class options to choose from and private pesticide re-certification credits are available for core, 3 and 5. Fertilizer re-certification credits are also available. The conference web page is http://go.osu.edu/swohfvsc. The cost is $50 and includes a continental breakfast, a buffet lunch and a USB memory stick with all of the available conference handouts. Registration closes February 4th.

AgricultuHER

 

From the fields, to the classroom, to the offices women are working to improve agriculture.

Often the skills women in agriculture need are the technical and mechanical ones. Through AgricultuHER you will learn the basic parts of an engine, and how they work together; managing the stress of working, farming and being a wife and mother. Practice tack welding and create a welding project. Tractor safety and operations will conclude our workshop. Giving you knowledge to operate a tractor to move hay or pull a grain cart.

All giving you a few basic skills to continue being an AgricultuHER!

 

Winter and Your Backyard Chickens

– Sabrina Schirtzinger, OSU Extension AgNR Educator, Knox County

Raising chickens during the winter has challenges; decreased egg production, frozen water, and possible frostbite. Winterizing your chicken coop will help to keep your flock healthy, happy and warm. There are several breeds of chickens that winter better than others. These chickens are: Ameraucanas, Ancona, Black Australorps, Black Giant, Brahma, Buff Orpingtons, Cochins, Delaware, Dominique, Langshan, New Hampshire, Plymouth Rocks, Rhode Island Red, Speckled Sussex and Wyandottes. Realizing that not everyone has these breeds; here is a list of possible strategies to be successful.

 

Block Drafts: Check the doors and windows for drafts. Simply locking the windows can help with drafts. Inspect your coop for holes. Turn the lights when it is dark, walk around the outside of the coop inspecting the structure for visible holes. If you have a store bought coop with several open fenced sides; consider purchasing heavy plastic, or a tarp to cover the fenced sides.

Increase Bedding: Add a large quantity of bedding for the winter. Check the moisture level in the coop daily; when adding large amounts of bedding you find yourself cleaning the coop more often.

Image result for winterizing your chicken coops

Feeding: Chickens eat more in the cold months to keep warm. Egg laying chickens need more carbohydrates for warmth and egg production. Providing cracked corn once a day, or increasing feed protein will help to increase egg production.

Egg Production: A decline or stop in egg production is natural. By providing 12-14 hours of light will help increase egg production. Put a light in your coop on a timer.

Frostbite: Occurs on feet, combs, and wattles. Gray/ blacken and brittle areas are indications of frostbite. Simply remove the snow from the chicken run (if possible), or straw areas to protect their feet when outdoors. Inside the coop make sure that all the chickens are able to roost up at night. Roosting allows the chicken to lie on their feet avoiding standing all night.

Image result for winterizing your chicken coops

Frozen Water: With winter weather frozen water is inevitable. Change the water once a day, be sure to change the water often on colder days to prevent freezing.  Heated water bowls or containers help to keep water from freezing. Be cautious as these devices have the ability to malfunction and cause a fire.

Even though your chickens may not be exposed to the harsh winter conditions with a little preparation they are very hardy animals.

Sources: Storey’s Guide to Raising Chickens, Tractor Supply Online Resources

Small/New Farm College

Are you a small farm landowner wondering what to do with your acreage?  Are you interested in exploring options for land uses but not sure where to turn or how to begin?  Have you considered adding an agricultural or horticultural enterprise but you just aren’t sure of what is required, from an equipment, labor, and/or management perspective?  Are you looking for someplace to get some basic farm information?  If you or someone you know answered yes to any of these questions, then the Ohio State University New and Small Farm College program may be just what you are looking for.

 

The Ohio State University New and Small Farm College is an 8 session short course that will be held one night a week.  The 2018 Ohio New and Small Farm College program will be held in two locations across the state including:

 

The Butler County location will be held at the OSU Extension Butler County office, 1802 Princeton Road Hamilton, Oh.  Classes will be held on Thursdays beginning January 18 and concluding March 8, 2018. A farm tour will be held Saturday March 10, 2018. Inclement weather makeup date will be March 15. Contact the Butler County Extension Office at 513-887-3722. You can register online at http://go.osu.edu/ButlerCollege.

 

The Scioto County area will be held at the Shawnee State University Massie Hall, 940 Second Street Portsmouth, Oh.  Classes will be held on Mondays beginning January 29 and concluding March 19, 2018. A farm tour will be held Saturday, March 31, 2018.

Inclement weather makeup date: March 26. For more information, contact Scioto County Extension at 740-354-7879. You can register online at http://go.osu.edu/SciotoCollege.

 

All colleges will start each evening at 6:00 PM with a light dinner with the nightly presentations beginning at 6:30 Pm and concluding at 9:00PM.

 

Topics that will be covered in the Small Farm College course include: Getting Started (goal setting, resource inventory, business planning), Appropriate Land Use -Walking The Farm, Where to Get Assistance, (identifying various agencies, organizations, and groups), Natural Resource Management including soils, ponds, woodlands and wildlife, Legal Issues, Insurance, Business Structure, Finances & Record Keeping, and Marketing Alternatives, Crop and Horticultural Production Options, Animal Production Options,

 

The cost of the course is $150 per person, $100 for an additional family member.  Each participating family will receive a small farm college notebook full of the information presented in each class session plus additional materials.  Registrations are now being accepted. For more details about the course and/or a registration form, contact Tony Nye, Small Farm Program Coordinator 937-382-0901 or email at nye.1@osu.edu.

Avoid Costly Problems in by Proper Winterizing of Your Sprayer Now

Clean that sprayer – credit Univ. of Nebraska.

Dr. Erdal Ozkan, Professor, Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department, The Ohio State University

It is very likely that you will not be using your sprayer again until next spring. If you want to avoid potential problems and save yourself from frustration and major headaches, you will be wise to give your sprayer a little bit of TLC (Tender Loving Care) these days. Yes this is still a busy time of the year for some of you, but don’t delay winterizing your sprayer too long if you already have not done so. You don’t want a pump that is cracked and/or not working at its full capacity because you did not properly winterize it before the temperature falls below freezing. Here are some important things you need to do with your sprayer this time of the year.

Rinsing
It is very likely that you did the right thing when you used the sprayer the last time: you rinsed the whole system (tank, hoses, filters, nozzles) thoroughly. If you did not, make sure this is done before storing the sprayer. A sprayer that is not rinsed thoroughly after each use, and especially after the spraying season is over, may lead to serious problems caused by cross-contamination of different products applied for different crops. Another problem that may result from lack of, or insufficient rinsing of the complete sprayer parts is clogged nozzles. Once the nozzles are clogged, it is extremely difficult to bring them back to their operating conditions when they were clean. Leaving chemical residues in nozzles will usually lead to changes in their flow rates, as well as in their spray patterns resulting in uneven distribution of chemicals on the target.

Depending on the tank, proper rinsing of the interior of the tank could be easy or challenging. It will be very easy if the tank is relatively new and is equipped with special rinsing nozzles and mechanism inside the tank. If this is not the case, manual rinsing of the tank interior is more difficult, and poses some safety problems such as inhaling fumes of leftover chemicals during the rinsing process. To avoid these problems, either replace the tank with one that has the interior rinse nozzles, or install an interior tank rinse system in your existing tank.

For effective rinsing of all the sprayer components, circulate clean water through the whole sprayer parts several minutes first with the nozzles off, then flush out the rinsate through the nozzles. Rinsing should be done preferably in the field, or on a concrete chemical mixing/loading pad with a sump to recover rinse water. Regardless, dispose of the rinsate according to what is recommended on the labels of the pesticides you have used. Always check the label for specific instructions. However, most labels recommend following procedure: If rinsing is done on a concrete rinse pad with a sump, put the rinsate collected in the sump back in the tank, dilute it with water and spray it in the field where there is no potential for the rinsate to reach ditches and other water bodies nearby. If the rinsing is done in the field, make sure you are not flushing out the rinsate in the system in one area. It is best to further dilute the rinse water in the tank and, spray it on the field on areas where there is no potential for the rinsate to reach ditches and other water bodies nearby.

Don’t forget to clean your sprayer – credit Tops-Life.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cleaning
Rinsing the system with water as explained above may not be sufficient to get rid of chemicals from the sprayer. This may lead to cross-contamination problems. Residues of some pesticides left in the sprayer may cause serious problems when a spray mixture containing these residual materials is applied on a crop that is highly sensitive to that pesticide. To avoid such problems, it is best to clean and rinse the entire spraying system with some sort of a cleaning solution. Usually a mixture of 1 to 100 of household ammonia to water should be adequate for cleaning the tank, but you may first need to clean the tank with a mixture containing detergent if tank was not cleaned weeks ago, right after the last spraying job was done. Some chemicals require specific rinsing solution. There is an excellent Extension Publication from University of Missouri which lists many commonly used pesticides and the specific rinsing solutions required for them. It is available online. Check it out (http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G4852). However, you should always check the product label to find out the most recent recommendations on cleaning agents.

Cleaning the outside of the sprayer components deserves equal attention. Remove compacted deposits with a bristle brush. Then flush the exterior parts of the equipment with water. A high pressure washer can be used, if available. Wash the exterior of the equipment either in the field away from ditches and water sources nearby, or a specially constructed concrete rinse pad with a sump. Again, the rinsate should be disposed of according to the label recommendations. As I mentioned earlier, most labels recommends the same practice: put the rinsate collected in the sump back in the tank, dilute it with water and spray it in the field where there is no potential for the rinsate to reach ditches and other water bodies nearby.

Winterizing
Check one more time to make sure there is no liquid left inside any of the sprayer parts to prevent freezing. Especially the pump, the heart of a sprayer, requires special care. You don’t want a pump that is cracked and/or not working at its full capacity because you did not properly winterize it before the temperature falls below freezing. After draining the water, add a small amount of oil, and rotate the pump four or five revolutions by hand to completely coat interior surfaces. Make sure that this oil is not going to damage rubber rollers in a roller pump or rubber parts in a diaphragm pump. Check the operator’s manual. If oil is not recommended, pouring one tablespoon of radiator rust inhibitor in the inlet and outlet part of the pump also keeps the pump from corroding. Another alternative is to put automotive antifreeze with rust inhibitor in the pump and other sprayer parts. This also protects against corrosion and prevents freezing in case all the water is not drained. To prevent corrosion, remove nozzle tips and strainers, dry them, and store them in a dry place. Putting them in a can of light oil such as diesel fuel or kerosene is another option.

Storage
Find ways to protect your sprayer against the harmful effects of snow, rain, sun, and strong winds. Moisture in the air, whether from snow, rain, or soil, rusts metal parts of unpro­tected equipment of any kind. This is especially true for a sprayer, because there are all kinds of hoses, rubber gaskets and plastic pieces all around a sprayer. Yes, the sun usually helps reduce moisture in the air, but it also causes damage. Ultraviolet light softens and weakens rubber materials such as hoses and tires and degrades some tank materials. The best protection from the environment is to store sprayers in a dry building. Storing sprayers in a building also gives you a chance to work on them any time during the off-season regardless of weather. If storing in a building is not possible, provide some sort of cover. When storing trailer-type sprayers, put blocks under the frame or axle and reduce tire pressure during storage.

Finally, check the condition of all sprayer parts one more time before leaving the sprayer behind. Identify the parts that may need to be worked on, or replaced. Check the tank, and hoses to make sure there are no signs of cracks starting to take place. Check the painted parts of the sprayer for scratched spots. Touch up these areas with paint to eliminate corrosion. By the way, don’t forget to cover openings so that birds don’t make a nest somewhere in your sprayer, and insects, dirt, and other foreign material cannot get into the system

Annie’s Project Retreat

Mission

Our mission is to empower farm and ranch women to be better business partners through networks and by managing and organizing critical information.

Who is Annie?

Annie grew up in a small farm community with a goal to marry a farmer, and she did. Annie spent her life learning how to be an involved business partner with her farm husband. Annie’s Project was designed by her daughter to provide risk management education for women involved in all aspects of the agriculture industry. Since 2000, well over 5,000 women have completed the workshop.

What will you gain?

Annie’s Project participants say they find answers, strength, and friendship – and also grow in confidence, business skills and community prestige through this program. Annie’s Project provides education and a support network to enhance business skills of women involved in all aspects of agriculture. Through the program, you will gain insight and knowledge about:

  • Your personality temperament and how it affects communication
  • The importance of organizational skills and goal setting.
  • How to find resources and work with professionals to meet your goals.

 

Registration is now open for the Annie’s Project Retreats located on the East and West of Ohio but open to anyone who would like to attend.

East Ohio Retreat  December 1-3, 2017

West Ohio Retreat February 2-4, 2018