Online Fruit Tree Pruning School

Anyone wishing to attend should register no later than Monday, February 28, 2022. Simply visit the link below and fill out the registration form. Registering once will get you links to all the sessions, simply attend as many or as few as you would like. We plan on again offering recordings afterward, so you can access the event on-demand, as we know this fits some people’s schedules better.

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Ohio Grape Grower Survey Coming Soon!

The Ohio grape industry produces grapes for wine, juice, and table grape use.  Over the last decade, the industry has grown rapidly in our state. Unfortunately, the USDA ceased conducting a regular Ohio grape census five years ago, making it difficult to track this growth or collect accurate information about the number of acres and production by grape variety. To fill this gap, the Ohio Grape Industries Committee has commissioned researchers at The Ohio State University to conduct an independent survey of all Ohio grape growers.

Dr. Douglas Jackson-Smith, a professor in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State, is leading the survey effort which is designed to reach all Ohio producers who grew wine, juice, or table grapes in 2021. Beginning the third week of January, researchers will send the survey to a comprehensive list of grape growers in the state, with an opportunity to respond through the mail or online.

The survey is voluntary and all responses will be treated as confidential. To get an accurate picture of the size and scope of the current Ohio grape industry, it will be critical to hear back from all producers. Aggregated results will be shared in a report that will be available to farmers, wineries, juice processors, and others to inform their decisions.

If you are a grape grower and do not receive a copy of the survey or if you have questions about the project, please reach out to Dr. Jackson-Smith at Jackson-smith.1@osu.edu or 330-202-3540.

Women Raising Children on Farms

Women raising children on farms in Ohio, Vermont, and Wisconsin wanted! Researchers are looking for women primary caregivers of children under 18 to participate in an on-line small group discussion and a short survey about how they are juggle children and work. $50 is available as a thank you for your time. For questions, contact Florence Becot with questions at 715-389-9379 or becot.florence@marshfieldresearch.org To sign up to participate, visit this link: https://redcap.link/WomenRaisingChildrenOnFarms

Small Ruminant AI Day in Licking County (August 21, 2021)

Dean Kreager, OSU Extension Educator ANR, Licking County

Artificial Insemination (AI) results from a multi-breeder insemination day in Licking County.

(Image Source: K Bar K Farm)

The Licking County Sheep Improvement Association has been working with OSU Extension to provide the opportunity for multiple breeders to bring sheep to one location for artificial insemination. The August 2020 date marked the 3rd year of this event. Insemination of 104 sheep occurred during the 2020 event and included both fresh and frozen semen.

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Hay Barn Fires are a Real Hazard

Hay fires are caused when bacteria in wet hay create so much heat that the hay spontaneously combusts in the presence of oxygen. At over 20% moisture mesophilic bacteria release heat-causing temperature to rise between 130°F to 140ºF with temperature staying high for up to 40 days. As temperatures rise, thermophilic bacteria can take off in your hay and raise temperature into the fire danger zone of over 175°F. Continue reading

Knox County Hazardous Waste Disposal

NOW SCHEDULING APPOINTMENTS

Knox County residents can now schedule appointments to properly dispose of hazardous waste by calling 740-393-4600.  Appointments are available the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month beginning in May and running through September.  Appointments are still available next week, May 12th.

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NOW IS THE TIME TO FINE TUNE YOUR SPRAYER

This article was submitted by Dr. Erdal Ozkan
Dept. of Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering

Pesticides need to be applied accurately and uniformly. Too little pesticide results in poor pest control and reduced yields, while too much injures the crop, wastes chemicals and money, and increases the risk of polluting the environment. Achieving satisfactory results from pesticides depends heavily on five major factors:

  1. Positive identification of the pest.
  2. Choosing the least persistent and lowest toxicity pesticide that will work.
  3. Selecting the right equipment, particularly the right type and size of nozzle for the job.
  4. Applying pesticides accurately at the right time.
  5. Calibrating and maintaining equipment to make sure the amount recommended on the chemical label is applied.

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