Small Ruminant AI Day in Licking County (August 21, 2021)

Dean Kreager, OSU Extension Educator ANR, Licking County

Artificial Insemination (AI) results from a multi-breeder insemination day in Licking County.

(Image Source: K Bar K Farm)

The Licking County Sheep Improvement Association has been working with OSU Extension to provide the opportunity for multiple breeders to bring sheep to one location for artificial insemination. The August 2020 date marked the 3rd year of this event. Insemination of 104 sheep occurred during the 2020 event and included both fresh and frozen semen.

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Hay Barn Fires are a Real Hazard

Hay fires are caused when bacteria in wet hay create so much heat that the hay spontaneously combusts in the presence of oxygen. At over 20% moisture mesophilic bacteria release heat-causing temperature to rise between 130°F to 140ºF with temperature staying high for up to 40 days. As temperatures rise, thermophilic bacteria can take off in your hay and raise temperature into the fire danger zone of over 175°F. Continue reading

Knox County Hazardous Waste Disposal

NOW SCHEDULING APPOINTMENTS

Knox County residents can now schedule appointments to properly dispose of hazardous waste by calling 740-393-4600.  Appointments are available the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month beginning in May and running through September.  Appointments are still available next week, May 12th.

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NOW IS THE TIME TO FINE TUNE YOUR SPRAYER

This article was submitted by Dr. Erdal Ozkan
Dept. of Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering

Pesticides need to be applied accurately and uniformly. Too little pesticide results in poor pest control and reduced yields, while too much injures the crop, wastes chemicals and money, and increases the risk of polluting the environment. Achieving satisfactory results from pesticides depends heavily on five major factors:

  1. Positive identification of the pest.
  2. Choosing the least persistent and lowest toxicity pesticide that will work.
  3. Selecting the right equipment, particularly the right type and size of nozzle for the job.
  4. Applying pesticides accurately at the right time.
  5. Calibrating and maintaining equipment to make sure the amount recommended on the chemical label is applied.

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Newborn Lamb Care Management

Jeffery Held, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science, South Dakota State University
(Previously published online with South Dakota State University Extension: December 19, 2018)

Proper newborn lamb care is a critical component of flock profitability. In the U.S. lamb mortality from all causes is approximately 20% with more than 80% of those losses occurring in the first two-weeks following lambing. Yet a solid lamb care management plan coupled with a few key tools in the lambing barn can sharply improve the number of lambs reared per-ewe. Generally, the top causes for newborn lamb losses are starvation, hypothermia (cold stress), respiratory disease, and scours followed by injury. Theoretically, these categories each stand alone, however the reality is often two-or-three of these occur simultaneously. Producers that develop a lambing time-management plan to incorporate appropriate lambing tools and gain key skills on newborn lamb care will benefit from less labor input and expense with a greater number of lambs weaned.

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Seasonal Scouting for Viburnum Leaf Beetle Eggs

Originally Posted on Buckeye Yard and Garden onLine- November 17, 2020

Author: Amy Stone

Egg Laying Site on Viburnum Leaf Beetle Stem

While the leaves of viburnum (Viburnum spp.) shrubs have fallen, if the viburnum leaf beetle (Pyrrhalta viburni) was present earlier this year, the eggs laid on the shrubs newest growth will be evident. This non-native invasive species feeds as both a larvae and adult, skeletonizing the viburnum leaves. When population levels of the insect increases, defoliation of the shrub becomes more obvious. The insect will feed on naturally growing viburnums, as well as those planted in landscapes, in commercial plantings and at gardens and arboretums.

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Farm Science Review Goes Virtual

the Farm Science Review is virtual this year.  To access the show follow this link https://fsr.osu.edu/  Farm Science Review staff and OSU Extension Educators have been working diligently to host the virtual farm science review.  I encourage you to check out the page and see the amazing line up of live and pre-recorded talks.

2020 FSR Gwynne Conservation Area Presentation Schedule. We have a full line-up of talks covering tree ID, invasive species, soil health, grazing management, invasive species control, tree ID, pond management, recreational lease hunting, pollinators and other beneficial insects, bats, owls, snakes, paw-paws, ginseng, and more.

There will also be Ask the Expert Sessions with topics ranging from Backyard Poultry Health, Farm Stress, Weather, Farm Neighbor Laws and much more. Here is the complete line up for the three days.

Tuesday through Thursday of the review, there will be one live webinar every day, starting at 10:30 am. Each day will also feature a one-hour Q&A session with natural resources and Extension professionals at 1 pm.