It’s that time of year … Don’t forget to calibrate your yield monitor!

Remember the old adage … Garbage in = Garbage out. Many of us use our yield data to make additional management decisions on our farms such as hybrid or variety selection, fertilizer applications, marketing, etc. Data from an uncalibrated yield monitor can haunt us for many years by leading us into improper decisions with lasting financial affects. In today’s Ag economy we can ill afford any decision with adverse financial implications.

The two biggest reasons I usually hear for not calibrating a yield monitor are 1) I just don’t have time to do it or 2) I can’t remember how to do it without getting my manual out.  While I know it’s easy to criticize from “the cheap seats”, I would argue that this could be some of the most important time you spend in your farming operation each year.  Like many other tasks on our farm, the more we do it, the easier it gets.  Yield monitor data has so much value!  This data provides a summary (in term of yield) of every single decision you made on your farm during the past year.

Below is a calibration checklist created by Dr. John Fulton and Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins.

Continue reading

Finding value in sharing farm data

Source: Jenna Lee and John Fulton

What will sharing my farm data accomplish and what is the value?

Many farmers may find themselves thinking about this very question as they weigh the benefits and drawbacks of sharing their farm data. The potential to realize value from data can often stem from sharing it via digital technologies to service providers or other consultants. In many cases, it may be necessary for a grower to share farm data with multiple entities in order to obtain the largest return on investment possible. While many simple solutions have been presented to farmers that make it easier than ever to share data, the benefits and tangible value of doing so have not been clearly or accurately conveyed.

Sharing data for use in collaborative tools may result in benefits such as:

  • Reducing the number of duplicate datasets generated or collected.
  • Innovative digital tools allow for drawing of site-specific information and learnings.
  • Allowing for one common data source that all decisions can be made from in order to eliminate confusion or inaccurate interpretation from outside sources.
  • Moving from collected data to actionable decisions quickly, and on-the-go.
  • Verifying original analyses and developing new insights from same data.
  • Generating trustworthy, data-backed answers and solutions for complex issues like water quality.
  • Identifying opportunities to improve efficiencies, reduce risk, and increase bottom line.
  • Empowering scientists and researchers to explore and develop new analyses.

Continue reading

Artificial Intelligence – How Is It Going To Change Our Industry?

Knox County’s 1st Autonomous Tractor

Only 33 days until the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium – Register now!

We are in the midst of unique and exciting times, when agriculture is transforming from the “old” precision agriculture to the era of artificial intelligence.  Artificial intelligence (AI) is a technology that exhibits behavior that could be interpreted as human intelligence. Can we apply artificial intelligence in agriculture? Can a computer be better than man in making decisions.  Can an algorithm beat farmer’s gut instinct and experience?

In recent years, agriculture has gone through a major revolution. From being one of the most traditional sectors, it has become one of the most progressive ones.

Artificial Intelligence will be a part of may presentations at the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium.  This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

 

 

Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production

Only 33 days until the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium – Register now!

Big Data is one of the current “buzz words’ in precision agriculture.

We can easily fill computer hard drives with the data we are able to collect today.  Just last year the Ohio State Precision Ag Team set a world record for the amount of data collected (18.4 gigabytes) from one corn plant during the growing season.  How much is 18.4 gigabytes?  Think of it this way.  According to the Ohio Country Journal, if you were to collect that much data per plant in a 100 acre field, you would need 360 million file cabinets to store all the data.

Our challenge today is to sort through all the data to determine the amount and type of data we are capable of managing.  Dr. John Fulton will address some of these issue in his presentation – “Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production” at the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium.

The event, hosted by Ohio State University Extension – Knox County and Ag Info Tech will take place Jan. 16 in Waldo, Ohio, at All Occasions Catering. Doors for registration will open at 8:30 a.m.  Lessiter Media’s Jack Zemlicka address the current adoption trends in precision ag and insights gained from farmers, dealers and manufacturers on where the industry is headed.

Other morning topics include:

  • What Will New Datum Changes Mean to Precision Agriculture, Jeff Jalbrzikowski
  • Artificial Intelligence – How is it going to change Our Industry, Tim Norris

Included between these presentations will be time for attendees to meet with sponsors of the events. Following the last presentation, there will be an hour-long lunch break.

After lunch, attendees will be able to go to breakout sessions on topics ranging from manufacturing and technology to data/software updates. The event will finish with a closing presentation from Dr. Scott Shearer on the future of precision agriculture.

This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

Lessiter Media Editor to Deliver Kick-off Address at 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium

Only 40 days until the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium – Register now!

Lessiter Media’s Jack Zemlicka will be delivering the first presentation during the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium. Zemlicka will address the current adoption trends in precision ag and insights gained from farmers, dealers and manufacturers on where the industry is headed.

The event, hosted by Ohio State University Extension – Knox County and Ag Info Tech will take place Jan. 16 in Waldo, Ohio, at All Occasions Catering. Doors for registration will open at 8:30 a.m. Zemlicka’s presentation, Precision Agriculture Adoption, will follow the 9 a.m. welcome address. Following him, there will be three more presentations in the first half of the day:

  • Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production, Dr. John Fulton
  • What Will New Datum Changes Mean to Precision Agriculture, Jeff Jalbrzikowski
  • Artificial Intelligence – How is it going to change Our Industry, Tim Norris

Included between these presentations will be time for attendees to meet with sponsors of the events. Following the last presentation, there will be an hour-long lunch break.

After lunch, attendees will be able to go to breakout sessions on topics ranging from manufacturing and technology to data/software updates. The event will finish with a closing presentation from Dr. Scott Shearer on the future of precision agriculture.

This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium

The Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium will be held on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at All Occasions Catering 6986 Waldo-Delaware Rd., Waldo Ohio from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.  This year’s program will feature the most current technologies available in precision agriculture. These topics will be shared by some of the leading university and industry Precision Ag experts.

This year’s program opens with a discussion regarding where we are in Precision Ag today – “The Adoption of Precision Ag Technologies” – Jack Zemlicka, Ag Division Content Director Lessiter Media and ends with a look into the crystal ball – “The Future of Precision Ag” – Dr. Scott Shearer, The Ohio State University.

Data management is a “hot “topic in today’s precision agriculture.  Dr. John Fulton will share his insights on “Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production”.  You will learn about data security and who can/has access to your data at afternoon breakout sessions from Climate-Fieldview, Agleader–Agfinity, and My JohnDeere.  Learn about the value of your data and opportunities for selling your data at one of the Farm Mobile breakout sessions.

Artificial intelligence is changing our industry.  Tim Norris will discuss “AI” and share insights from Knox County’s first autonomous tractor.  “AI” will be part of several other afternoon breakout sessions as well.  New datum changes are scheduled for 2022.  Jeff Jalbrzikowski will explain how this change could potentially affect our current maps and GPS positioning files.

To be the premier source of research-based information in the age of digital agriculture” is the vision of the Ohio State Digital Ag Program.  Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins will discuss the nearly 100 OSU on-farm research trials conducted throughout Ohio in 2018.  Everyone in attendance will receive a copy of the 2018 eFields Report.

Afternoon breakout sessions will include manufacturing and technology updates including how to get the most from your in-cab displays from John Deere, Case IH AFS, Precision Planting, Capstan, AGCO, New Holland and Soil Max.

$50 registration fee includes a buffet lunch, breaks and a notebook containing all presentations.  Seating is limited, registration deadline is December 28, 2018.

This symposium will provide up to 11.5 Continuing Education Credits (CEU’s) for Certified Crop Advisors,

S&W – .5, I.P.M. – 5.5, C.M. – 5.5.

This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

For more information or to download registration form, go to http://u.osu.edu/knoxcountyag/2018/11/28/central-ohio-pre…ion-ag-symposium/ or

https://knox.osu.edu/news/central-ohio-precision-ag-symposium or contact the OSU Extension Office in Knox County at 740-397-0401 or AgInfoTech 740-507-2503.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

CONSERVATION TILLAGE CONFERENCE: NEW TOPICS FOR CHANGING AG

by Mark Badertscher

So what is the relationship between healthy soils and healthy water? How can you manage inputs and planting date for high economic corn yields? Which soils should respond to sulfur applications? What are some opportunities and considerations with subsurface placement of nutrients? How can you build soil health and organic matter with cover crops and no-till? How can you use economics in the choice between growing corn and soybeans? What will the revised P index look like? How can you get started in honey bees, barley, or hops production? What are some methods to manage invasive plants around the farm?

These are all questions you might have asked yourself, but have struggled to find an answer. This year’s Conservation Tillage Conference (CTC) has the answers to these questions and many more. The McIntosh Center at Ohio Northern University will once again be the location were about 60 presenters, several agribusiness exhibitors, and approximately 900 participants will come together March 6th and 7th in Ada, Ohio. Attend this year’s conference to add value to your operation by learning new ideas and technologies to expand your agronomic crops knowledge.

A general session with well-known author David Montgomery from the University of Washington discussing “From Dirt to Regenerating our Soils” will officially open this year’s conference. Corn University, Nutrient Management, Precision Ag & Digital Technologies, Healthy Soils for Healthy Water, Regenerative Ag, and Healthy Foods from Healthy Soils are the sessions that make up day one.

On the second day, conference participants will be able to choose from Soybean School, Water Quality Research and BMPs, Alternative Crops, Pest Management of the Atypical Pests: Slugs, voles and more, Healthy Soils for Healthy Waters Precision Nutrient Management, and Healthy Water. In addition, there will be an EPA required dicamba training on both days of this year’s Conservation Tillage Conference provided for pesticide applicators in attendance. To register for one of these Monsanto-provided dicamba application requirements training events, go to: www.roundupreadyxtend.com/training.

Find out what experts from OSU Extension, OARDC, USDA, and SWCD are learning from the latest research about the timely topics that affect today’s farmers, crop consultants, and agribusiness professionals who are out in the field working together to produce crops in an efficient and environmentally responsible manner. Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) and Certified Livestock Manager (CLM) credits will be available to those who attend. Visit ctc.osu.edu and make plans to participate in this year’s Conservation Tillage Conference by February 24 to take advantage of early registration rates.

 

2018 Central Ohio Agronomy School – Night #3

Becks Mike Hannewald discusses Creating Management Zones, Hybrid Placement, Multi-Hybrid Results and Hybrid Management at this week’s Agronomy School.

 

 

 

 

 

Mike explains steps in creating zone maps and the accuracy of these zones.

 

The Central Ohio Agronomy School meets every Monday beginning February 5 through March 5 from 6:30 – 9 p.m.

 

YIELD DATA QUALITY FOR POST-HARVEST ANALYSES

by: Elizabeth Hawkins, Kaylee Port, John Fulton

As the number of tools and services utilizing precision ag data to aide in decision making continues to increase, the importance of having quality data is also increasing. Most producers understand the importance of yield monitor calibration for generating accurate yield estimates, but there are other errors that can impact both the accuracy and the spatial integrity of yield data. Spatial integrity of yield data becomes very important when being used to generating prescriptions for fertilizer and seeding. Spatial inaccuracies in yield data become a problem when using yield maps to create management zones and subsequent input decisions by zone within a field. Taking the time to evaluate quality and removing erroneous data ensures prescriptions and other maps based off yield data are correct.

When processing yield data this winter, some errors to be mindful of include: header height setting, quick stop-start errors, flow delay setting, and header/ platform width setting. Each of these errors will result in inaccurate yield estimates impacting maps created from yield maps. The following outlines some of the potential errors:

…Read More …