‘Hardy’ mums? Here’s how to help them survive

Originally posted in the Dayton Daily News.

Have you noticed that “hardy” mums aren’t necessarily hardy and don’t come back in the spring? I have had many gardeners complain about planting mums in the fall only to have them die.

I have two answers for you. One, just consider them annuals and enjoy their fall color and plant them every year in late summer. The other answer takes a bit of work, but you are more likely to be successful.

Proper care of decorative mums leads to successful overwintering. CONTRIBUTED

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What to Do with a Monster Zucchini!

August 13, 2020 by sharigallup

If you are out and about at farmers markets this summer, don’t be afraid of the monster zucchini! Finding fresh and unique food for a bargain is always exciting.  This weekend at the market I found a zucchini the size of Texas for .50 cents!  I hesitated to buy it because I was taught that they “aren’t as tender and have more seeds.” But I wanted to find out for myself if this were true, plus I was really curious how many dishes I could make from one large zucchini.

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Poison Hemlock and Wild Parsnip are Blooming in Southern Ohio

 

Originally posted on Buckeye Yard and Garden Online

By Joe Boggs- June 3, 2020

Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) and wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) are two of our nastiest non-native weeds found in Ohio.  Poison hemlock is one of the deadliest plants in North America.  Wild parsnip can produce severe, painful blistering.  Both are commonly found growing together.

Poison hemlock and wild parsnip are members of the carrot family, Apiaceae.  The old name for the family was Umbelliferae which refers to the umbel flowers.  They are a key family feature with short flower stalks rising from a common point like the ribs on an umbrella.

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Virtual Office Hours – Knox AgChat

As you know The Ohio State University has closed all Campuses and Extension offices.  While our office is closed, we are working from home and will continue to do so until we are able to return.   You can reach us by phone (740-397-0401) Monday through Friday from 8 – 5.  You can also reach us anytime by email:

        John – barker.41@osu.edu              Sabrina – schirtzinger.55@osu.edu

In the meantime we are working diligently to create new options to stay in contact with everyone.  With this in mind, beginning Monday April 6 we will begin VIRTUAL OFFICE HOURS – Knox AgChat

Knox AgChat will provide us the opportunity to utilize video and/or audio conferencing on your computer or cell phone.  You can join us online here: https://osu.zoom.us/j/3927263521  or join by phone 1-253-215-8782 and enter Meeting ID: 392 726 3521.

We will focus on Ag questions from 7:30 – 8 and Horticulture questions from 8 – 8:30.

Additionally, we plan to periodically invite guest speakers to our chat.  We will post that schedule each week.

 

Is It A Pine, Spruce, or Fir?

Originally posted on the Buckeye Yard and Garden OnLine

By: Amy Stone and Curtis Young

White Fir, Photo Credit: Curtis Young

Everyone has probably struggled with plant identification at some point in their life. While some of us may still be learning – it can be on ongoing process, others may have mastered the skills involved in identifying plants in the landscape, woodlots or streetscapes.

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5 Reasons Why Soil Biology Matters on the Farm

Jeff Goodwin, Conservation Stewardship Leader and Pasture and Range Consultant
(Previously published with Noble Research Institute; March 13, 2019)

Success and long-term viability for most agricultural enterprises ultimately hinges on the health of their soil. This is true for beef operations in the Southern Great Plains to row crop farms in the Midwest.

For decades, the agriculture industry has focused, studied, and ultimately understood the physical and chemical characteristics of our soil resource (e.g., soil texture, soil pH, etc.). However, until the past few years, little emphasis has been placed on the biological constituents and their importance in a healthy, functional soil.

 

 

 

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What to Plant in the Fall Season

The nights are cooler. The days are shorter. Vegetables in the garden are looking peaked, and summer flowers are turning brown.

 It’s prime time for some planting.

“A typical consumer looks at it as, ‘Oh, winter is coming, let’s give up gardening.’ That’s not necessarily so,” said Daniel Struve, an Ohio State horticulturalist emeritus. In fact, he recommends fall for planting many trees, shrubs, grass and flower bulbs and even fall flowers for some late color.

Sean Barnes, a horticulturist at Ohio State’s Chadwick Arboretum & Learning Gardens, agrees — noting that trees and shrubs benefit from a chance to get their roots established before the stress of a hot, dry summer.

They shared their tips for making the most of fall planting.

Are you planting trees and shrubs?

Warm fall soils promote root growth. “They really are active; you just can’t see it,” Struve said.

There are exceptions.

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