Virtual Office Hours – Knox AgChat

As you know The Ohio State University has closed all Campuses and Extension offices.  While our office is closed, we are working from home and will continue to do so until we are able to return.   You can reach us by phone (740-397-0401) Monday through Friday from 8 – 5.  You can also reach us anytime by email:

        John – barker.41@osu.edu              Sabrina – schirtzinger.55@osu.edu

In the meantime we are working diligently to create new options to stay in contact with everyone.  With this in mind, beginning Monday April 6 we will begin VIRTUAL OFFICE HOURS – Knox AgChat

Knox AgChat will provide us the opportunity to utilize video and/or audio conferencing on your computer or cell phone.  You can join us online here: https://osu.zoom.us/j/3927263521  or join by phone 1-253-215-8782 and enter Meeting ID: 392 726 3521.

We will focus on Ag questions from 7:30 – 8 and Horticulture questions from 8 – 8:30.

Additionally, we plan to periodically invite guest speakers to our chat.  We will post that schedule each week.

 

FARMERS AND FOOD GROUPS INNOVATE TO KEEP OPERATIONS VIABLE AS THE CORONAVIRUS SPREADS

FARMERS WHO SELL DIRECTLY TO CUSTOMERS AT FARMERS’ MARKETS AND THROUGH CSAS ARE COMING UP WITH NOVEL SOLUTIONS AT BREAKNECK SPEED TO KEEP THEIR CUSTOMERS FED AND THEIR OPERATIONS VIABLE.

By : Leah Douglas

For Jody Osmund, who runs Cedar Valley Sustainable Farm with his partner, Beth, in Ottawa, Illinois, the shuttering of public spaces to mitigate the spread of the new coronavirus presents a significant challenge. He typically distributes his farm shares at brewery taprooms around the Chicago area, which allows him to share a pint with customers while supporting local businesses. So how should he proceed when many bars and restaurants are closed, and heath guidelines demand that people keep their distance?

Enter the pool noodle.

Osmund used the noodle to mark out a safe distance between him and the members of his community-supported agriculture program at this week’s distribution site. “I’d take their name and get their CSA share. Then [I] would set it down for them and back away before they would pick it up,” he described via email. “It was a little awkward, but the pool noodle was disarming and brought a little levity.”

As the spread of the coronavirus causes many cities to curtail public gatherings, farmers who sell directly to customers at farmers’ markets and through CSAs are coming up with novel solutions at breakneck speed to keep their customers fed and their operations viable.

Some food distribution groups are even rethinking their entire delivery model, trying to ensure that farmers still have a market and customers still have access to fresh food.

Their adaptations include, of course, improving sanitary practices by frequently washing hands and offering sanitizer to customers. Farmers at markets are wearing gloves, handling produce themselves rather than having shoppers select items, and eliminating sampling. Those who distribute CSA shares are pre-bagging and bringing them to customers’ cars or operating in the parking lots of the closed business or churches where they would otherwise distribute.

Some organizations are piloting home delivery for the first time, as many shoppers are self-isolating or quarantined at home. Farm Fresh Rhode Island’s Market Mobile program typically delivers wholesale orders of local produce and other farm goods to restaurants and universities across the state. But this week, the group rolled out a new system that allowed individual households to place orders online and have food dropped off right at their door. Continue reading

Summer Heats Up and So Are Brisket Prices

– David P. Anderson, Professor and Extension Economist, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, Originally posted on the BEEF Newsletter

Brisket prices are heating up just like summer temperatures. One of the most interesting beef demand trends over the last few years has been the growth in demand for briskets. It’s not just new craft bbq joints popping up everywhere in Texas, but even big chains like Arby’s jumping in and they all serve brisket.

Continue reading

Ag-note: Niche Marketing – An Agriculture Alternative

By: Murphy Deutsch, Emily Starlin, Breanna Sharp, Eric Moore, OSU Animal Science Undergraduate Students
Brady Campbell, Program Coordinator, OSU Sheep Team

 

This weeks Ag-note comes from OSU students Murphy Deutsch, Emily Starlin, Breanna Sharp, and Eric Moore as they discuss a topic that is unique to the small ruminant industry, niche marketing. One of the greatest benefits that small ruminants producers have here in the state of Ohio is the endless opportunity to marketing their livestock products to several different consumers. Whether you are producing breeding stock, show lambs, wool and fiber, or meat products, you will certainly be able to find your niche.

Continue reading

Generations of maple syrup making

Originally posted in Farm and Dairy- 

Bonhomie Acres
Kelly and Dan Brown, Knox County-area maple syrup producers.

Maple Syrup Producers Could Face New Rules

Originally posted in Farm and Dairy, February 1, 2018

Author: Chris Kick

SALEM, Ohio — The recently enacted federal food safety law, known as the Food Safety Modernization Act, includes new requirements for maple syrup producers.

The rules differ, depending on the size of operation and how you sell your syrup, and there is still some ambiguity on exactly what a producer must do.

In Ohio and Pennsylvania, maple syrup production is regulated at the state level, and is considered a low-risk food because of its contents and simple method of preparation.

Ohio producers who gather and boil 75 percent or more of their own sap are considered exempt from state inspection, but may be subject to the new federal rule.

Getting registered

Dan Milo, food safety supervisor at the Ohio Department of Agriculture, said his understanding is that producers who wholesale more than they retail need to register with the Food and Drug Administration.

Milo said the online registration is free. If the producer does not have a computer, they can contact their local OSU Extension office for assistance.

Milo said few Ohio operations would likely be large enough to register, but if they are, they would be subject to FDA inspection. His office conducts the state inspections, and also contracts with FDA to provide federal inspections, with the goal of bringing producers into compliance, he said, rather than fined.

In Pennsylvania, Lydia Johnson, who directs the Bureau of Food Safety and Laboratory Services, said Pennsylvania maple syrup producers are required to register with the state, unless the production is done for personal use or close friends and family.

State registration costs $35 and assures the producer adheres to guidelines such as a good physical structure for producing syrup, proper equipment and utensils, rodent control, sanitation and other basic considerations of producing a safe product.

Seek exemption

Johnson said she’s telling Pennsylvania producers to register with the FDA, but to seek an exemption from the Preventive Control’s Rule, which allows “small” and “very small” businesses to be exempt, if the syrup production is done on their own farm.

Producers who are granted an exemption would still need to comply with FDA’s Good Manufacturing Practices, according to an info sheet provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

Maple syrup producers who do not meet this size and on-farm production requirement would likely need to comply with at least some form of the Preventive Controls Rule, according to the department.

Ohio and Pennsylvania are both working with state Extension programs to educate producers on what they need to do.

Gary Graham, maple syrup specialist with Ohio State University Extension, said producers typically have a narrow window of time to register, between October and December, and registration is only open in even years, including this year (2018) and again in 2020.

He’s telling Ohio producers to follow the wholesale versus retail rule, and that if they wholesale more than they retail, they need to register.

Graham said registration has been difficult for some Amish and Mennonite producers, who often do not have a computer or a phone. He said the FDA is accepting hard copy registrations this year, but that in 2020, everything must be done electronically, unless a waiver is requested.

Additional resources

Graham has worked with Milo to give presentations on the new requirements, and the two have also teamed up to publish a 76-page document called A Brief Summary of the Regulations of Maple Syrup Production in Ohio.

The publication is available on the OSU Extension Holmes County website: https://holmes.osu.edu/maple, where you will also find registration forms.

If a producer is still unsure about what to do, or if they are required to register, Graham said they should contact FDA or visit the FDA food safety website: www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/.

Food Label Lingo

 

By: Carol Hamilton  an Extension Educator (Delaware County)

Each time you enter a supermarket, you are faced with nearly 40,000 products to choose from[1]. Each product brightly colored, strategically placed and wordsmithed perfectly to convince you not to leave the store without it. So, how as consumers can we decipher all the information food packages provide and use it to make better purchasing decisions for our families? We have to learn the food label lingo. First, it is important to recognize that all food products have five standard components regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Reading food labelsAll food products have five standard components regulated by the FDA.

  1. Product Identity (product name that accurately describes the package contents)
  2. Net Content (product quantity or weight)
  3. Nutrition facts
  4. Ingredients/ allergen statement
  5. Signature Line (including company name and address of the manufacturer or distributor)

But most packages contain a slew of additional information that highlights anything from farm practices, to health benefits, to social and economic practices. There are three possible origins of food label claims and statements, 1) government agencies like the USDA and FDA; 2) third-party organizations like American Grassfed®, Non-GMO Project Verified, Fair Trade Certified, and Certified Angus Beef®; and 3) food manufacturers or producers.

Government issued labels were created to: ensure fair competition among producers, provide consumers with basic product information, and most importantly to reduce health and safety risks[2]. Government labels always have the agency from which the standards originate listed, for example USDA organic or Dolphin Safe, United States Department of Commerce. Government standards and record of companies holding their certifications can be accessed online or by contacting the respective agency.Dolphin Safe Seal

Third-party labels were created to enhance the intelligibility and credibility of certain food attributes through the use of standards, verification, certification, and enforcement[2]. Each organization is responsible for determining their own set of standards that producers must follow to use their trademarked seal. Third-party labels can vary from very strict standards that require yearly audits to very loose standards that are more like a subscription with no verification process. I encourage consumers to do additional research on labels they think align with their values to ensure they match.

Lastly, producers and manufacturers create a number of food label claims and statements to entice consumers. A few of the more current statements include: natural, 100% pure, all, made with real fruit, made with whole grains, lightly-sweetened, a good source of fiber, local, and strengthens your immune system[3]. Be wary of these statements because they are unregulated and defined entirely by the manufacturer.

To learn more, visit my website Understanding Food Labels. Here you will find hundreds of food labels, videos and educational resources that can be used in Extension program efforts.


Resources:

[1] Food Marketing Institute. (2017, November 13). Supermarket Facts. Retrieved 2017, from https://www.fmi.org/our-research/supermarket-facts

[2] Golan, E., Kuchler, F., & Mitchell, L. (2000). Economics of Food Labeling. Washington: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Retrieved from https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/41203/18885_aer793.pdf?v=41063

[3] Silverglade, B., & Heller, I. R. (2010). Food Labeling Chaos. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest. Retrieved from https://cspinet.org/sites/default/files/attachment/food_labeling_chaos_report.pdf

2018 Knox County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Classes

2018 Knox County Beekeepers Association Beekeeping Classes

Beginners Beekeeping Class 1 Beginner Beekeeping Class 2
Date: February 10, 2018 Date: February 24, 2018
Cost: $45 per person Cost: $45 per person 
*Lunch will be provided *Lunch will be provided
*Book included: “First Lessons in Beekeeping” *KCBA Advanced Manual included
*Free membership to Knox County Beekeepers Association
*Free one-year membership to the Ohio State Beekeepers Association

Classes Location: Hunter Hall, 211 South Main St., Mt. Vernon, OH 43050
Mount Vernon Nazarene University, Hunter Hall and The location of the Happy Bean Coffee Shop
PLEASE REGISTER BY: February 5, 2018 to Jeff Gabric: 515-450-1359
Students are free but must register.

Beginners Beekeeping Class ONE                                                  Beginner Beekeeping Class TWO
February 10th, 2018                                                                             February 24th, 2018
8:00 to 9:00 Registration Coffee and Donuts                                       Registration Coffee And Donuts
9:00 – 9:15       So You Want to Become a Beekeeper?                        Hive Inspections
9:15 – 9:45       What You Need to Get Started                                        Hive Management       
9:45 – 10:00     Hive Parts and Accessories                                           Over-Wintering Bees
10:00 -10:15    Break                                                                                Break
10:15 -10:45    Where to Get Bees                                                              Honey Bee Biology
10:45 -11:00    How to Install Bees                                                            Dealing with Varroa Mites and SHB
11:00 -11:30    How to Begin Working with Bees                                Re-queening a Colony
11:30 -12:30    Lunch                                                                                 Lunch
12:30 -12:45    Choosing a Location.                                                        Making Increases and Nucs
12:45 -1:00      Sources of Bees                                                                   Swarm Prevention
1:00 – 1:30      Honey Bee Biology                                                             Honey Production       
1:30 – 1:45      Break                                                                                  Break
1:45- 2:45        Now What? Putting it all Together                              Laying Workers and Merging
2:45 – 3:00       Round-table discussion                                                 Feeding Bees

SEE US AT: www.knoxbees.com