Take Action Weed Management Webinars

By: Dr. Mark Loux, OSU

Given how messed up the whole herbicide supply and price thing is right now, it might be a good time to take advantage of free resources to improve your herbicide and weed management acumen. The USB Take Action program and university weed scientists are once again conducting a series of webinars to cover several key topics in weed management. Three webinars occur this month, and will be followed by the release of videos covering other pertinent weed-related subjects. January webinars include the following:

Value of Residuals in Herbicide-Resistant Weed Problems – Thursday, January 20, 11 am EST

Harvest Weed Seed Control Practices – Thursday, January 27, 11 am EST

Registration information can be found here.  Videos of the webinars will be made available following their broadcast.

Another great resource is the “War Against Weeds” podcast.  This podcast features guests with expertise in a variety of aspects of weed science, and discussions on integrated weed management, herbicide resistance, and other timely topics. The podcast is hosted by Sarah Lancaster, Kansas State Extension Weed Science Specialist, Mandy Bish, Extension Weed Scientist at the University of Missouri, and Joe Ikley, Extension Weed Scientist at North Dakota State.  Podcast episodes are available at https://waragainstweeds.libsyn.com/ and also on Spotify, iTunes, and Google Podcasts.

 

 

Save the Dates – Central Ohio Agronomy School

Due to COVID uncertainties the 2022 Central Ohio Agronomy School has been pushed to March. 

Monday March 7 – 6:30 – 9:00p.m.

Monday March 14 – 6:30 – 9:00p.m.

Monday March 21 – 6:30 – 9:00p.m.

Monday March 28 – 6:30 – 9:00p.m.

The School will be at the new Ramser 4-H Activity Center (on the fairgrounds)

700 Perimeter Dr.  Mount Vernon, OH  43050

More details to come

Herbicide Resistance in Ohio Waterhemp Populations

Source:  Mark Loux, OSU Extension

Waterhemp populations across the Midwest continue to develop more complex variations of herbicide resistance.  Multiple resistance to an increasing number of herbicide sites of action is the norm in many populations in states west of Ohio.  Waterhemp has on the whole developed resistance to seven sites of action, including the following:

Group 2 – ALS inhibitors – chlorimuron, imazethapyr, etc

Group 4 – Synthetic auxins – 2,4-D, dicamba, etc

Group 5 – Photosystem II inhibitors – atrazine, metribuzin, etc

Group 9 – EPSP synthase inhibitor – glyphosate

Group 14 – PPO inhibitors – fomesafen, flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, etc

Group 15 – long chain fatty acid inhibitors – metolachlor, pyroxasulfone, etc

Group 27 – HPPD inhibitors – mesotrione, isoxaflutole, topramezone, etc

Individual populations with resistance to three or more sites of action are common.  Mutations are occurring that confer resistance to several of these sites of action simultaneously, through a resistance mechanism that enhances the metabolism and inactivation of the herbicides by the plant.  For example, there appears to be a linkage in the resistance to mesotrione and atrazine, where resistance to one means it’s likely that resistance to the other occurs also.  Weed scientists have concluded that this weed is capable of developing resistance to any herbicide site of action used against it.  We aren’t actually sure what the correct recommendation is for stewardship of herbicides once a single mutation can confer resistance to multiple sites of action.  Which is the reason we stress the need to take steps in mid to late season to prevent seed from plants that survive management strategies.

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Leafhoppers, Grasshoppers, and Beetles, Oh My!

Source: Kelley Tilmon, Andy Michel, OSU

As the summer progresses we are receiving reports of insect problems often encouraged by hot, dry weather.  Last week we reported on spider mites and especially if you are in an area of continued dry weather we recommend scouting your soybeans and corn  https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-22/watch-spider-mites-dry-areas .

Some areas are also reporting increases in young grasshoppers in soybeans, another insect favored by dry weather.  Grasshoppers of often start on field edges so early scouting may allow for an edge treatment.  Japanese beetles are another common defoliator of soybean that are starting to appear.  Both of these pests fall into a general defoliation measurement, and we recommend treatment if defoliation is approaching 20% on the majority of plants in post-flowering beans.  Download our guide to estimating defoliation in soybean at https://aginsects.osu.edu/sites/aginsects/files/imce/Leaf%20Defoliators%20PDF_0.pdf

A weird problem being reported not just in Ohio but in parts of the Midwest as far-flung as Minnesota is the red headed flea beetle, which is being found in corn and soybean.  This is a small, narrow, shiny black beetle with a red head which springs like a flea when disturbed.  Feeding in soybean creates small round holes and in corn longer narrow strips of damage.  This feeding is seldom economic.  In soybean follow the general defoliation threshold of 20%.  Leaf feeding in corn is almost never economic, but be on the watch for silk-clipping, which is rare but possible.  There are no thresholds in corn, but our Minnesota colleague Bruce Potter suggest this guideline: “flea beetles are very numerous (it is likely more than 5-10/plant), pollination is less than 50% complete, and numerous plants have silks clipped to within 1/2 inch, you might consider an insecticide.”

Finally, earlier in the season we reported higher than usual numbers of potato leafhopper in alfalfa and encouraged stepping up scouting.  In some fields third-cut alfalfa is being heavily impacted by this insect.  You can review our scouting advice for this insect at https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2020-17/time-start-scouting-potato-leafhoppers-alfalfa

Drought Projections Do Not Go Well With Fungicide Applications

Source: Anne Dorrance, Pierce Paul, OSU

Several calls this past week for fungicide applications on corn and soybean at all different growth stages.  So let’s review what might be at stake here.

Soybeans.  Frogeye leaf spot and white mold on susceptible varieties when the environment is favorable for disease easily pay the cost of application plus save yield losses.  Let’s dig a bit deeper.  Both of these diseases are caused by fungi but frogeye leaf spot is a polycyclic disease, meaning that multiple infections occur on new leaves through the season while white mold is monocyclic and the plant is really only susceptible during the flowering stage.  Both of these diseases are also limited geographically in the state.  White mold is favored in North East Ohio and down through the central region where fields are smaller and air flow can be an issue.  Frogeye has been found on highly susceptible varieties south of 70, but it is moving a bit north so it is one that I am watching.

White mold is also favored by closed canopy, cool nights and high relative humidity.  So farmers in these areas should double check their variety ratings first.  If it is moderate to low score for resistance (read the fine print) then this year a spray may be warranted.  We have gotten consistent control of white mold with Endura at R1.  Herbicides that are labeled for white mold suppression have also knocked back this disease, but if a drought occurs or no disease develops, losses of 10% or greater can occur due to the spray alone.  For these purposes R1 is a flower on the bottom of 1/3 of the plants in the field.

Frogeye leaf spot –There also must be some inoculum or low level of disease present in the field for this disease to cause substantial and measurable yield losses.   This disease will only move in the canopy when there is regular rainfall.  And again only on susceptible varieties. With dry weather, this will sit and hold. Time to scout for this will be at the end of flowering if it can be found in the field.  With drought conditions, the disease will not impact the crop.

The story is very similar from a corn pathology standpoint. Most of our major diseases (gray leaf spot, northern corn leaf blight, eye spot) are driven by wet, humid conditions, consequently, the dry weather we have experienced over the last several days will keep most diseases in check. Fungicides are not warranted under these conditions; it just does not pay. Although some product labels may mention yield responses under drought-like condition, our data do not support such a benefit. We see the highest yield responses when fungicides are applied to susceptible hybrids at VT-R1 under disease-favorable conditions. These conditions would include extended periods of dew and high relative humidity, especially during the early- to mid-morning hours.

For a disease like southern rust that usually blows up from the south, and tar spot, an emerging disease of increasing concern in the state, fields should be scouted before making an application. Both diseases develop well under warm conditions, but they also need moisture and high relative humidity to spread. In the case of tar spot, based on what we have seen in 2018 and 2019, it usually develops well into grain fill (R4-R5), and as such, may have little effect on grain yield. Data from some states in the western half of the corn belt show that when tar spot develops early, yield loss may be substantial. The same is true for early southern rust development. So, scout fields to see what is out there and at what level before investing in fungicide application.