Venomous Caterpillars

By: Joe Boggs, Originally Posted on Buckeye Yard and Garden OnLine, September 11,2019

Smaller Parasa Slug Caterpillar

Participants in last week’s Ohio Plant Diagnostic Workshop looked at but didn’t touch, the Smaller Parasa (Parasa chloris).  They kept their distance because the deceptively named caterpillar packs a venomous punch that’s far from small.  As with many creatures in Nature (e.g. crocodilians, mamba snakes, grizzly bears, etc.); these caterpillars should not be handled.

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White Masses on Stems of Redbud

Joe Boggs, Extension Educator. Originally posted on the Buckeye Yard and Garden Online

Small, sticky, snowy-white masses are appearing on the stems of redbuds (Cercis canadensis) in southern Ohio.  They could easily be mistaken for soft scales, mealybugs, or insect egg masses.  However, they are the “egg plugs” of a treehopper originally named the Two-Marked Treehopper (Enchenopa binotata, family Membracidae).

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Tips for a Successful Zucchini, Squash and Cucumber Harvest

Tim McDermott, OSU Extension Educator- Franklin County ,Previously posted on VegNet Newsletter

For many backyard growers, community gardeners and urban farmers, growing the cucurbits can be a challenge.  This vegetable (fruit?)  family is affected by a large number of garden insects as well as both bacterial and fungal disease.  There are a few tips and tricks that can be used to make sure some harvest makes it to the table or sales booth in 2019.

First thing to do is mind your pollinators.  Cucurbits are commonly dependent on pollinators as they have separate male and female flowers.  Once the flowers emerge, use of pesticides can damage pollinators and lead to decreased harvest.

The male flower is at the bottom right. It is simply a flower at the end of the stem. The female flower of this yellow summer squash is behind the male flower and has an immature fruit at the base.

Scouting is a very important part of the Integrated Pest Management strategy.  I had not seen cucumber beetles in large numbers until the July 4th holiday weekend.  Then I started to see them in moderate to large numbers on my summer squash in central Ohio.

 

Adult Striped Cucumber Beetle. This bug will damage leaves, stems, flowers, and fruit while feeding. It also transmits a bacterial wilt that can rapidly cause death in cucurbit plants.

 

 

This is an adult squash vine borer. They lay eggs at the base of the stems and their larvae then tunnel through the stem of the plant disrupting vascular flow and often killing the plant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These plantings of winter squash, both Waltham Butternut and Buttercup, died over the last weekend in July while the summer squash persisted. Suspects include squash vine borer damage or bacterial wilt from cucumber beetles.

 

Squash bugs are another common pest of cucurbits that can be present in large numbers in plantings.

Squash bug eggs are laid white, then rapidly change color to bronze. They are commonly found on the underside of cucurbit leaves and should be removed immediately when discovered and discarded away from the plants.

This is the juvenile form of squash bugs. They can achieve large numbers fairly rapidly.

White-Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar Outbreaks

By: Joe Boggs, OSU Extension Educator- Originally posted on Buckeye Yard and Garden onLine

White-Marked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Heavy localized populations of white-marked tussock moth (Orgyia leucostigma) caterpillars are being reported in central and western Ohio.  Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) showed images during this week’s BYGL Zoom Inservice of caterpillars on a variety of hosts including rose and noted he had received reports of hot spots in Allen, Hancock, and Putnam Counties.  I received a report from Franklin County of 100% defoliation of a landscape redbud.

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Keeping Tomatoes Healthy in Wet Weather

By: Tim McDermott, OSU Extension Educator, Franklin County. Originally posted on Franklin County

We are in the middle of a period of wet weather that is predicted to deliver multiple inches of rain to central Ohio and even more to other soaked parts of our state.  Tomatoes are a crop that can suffer several problems related to heavy rainfall that can shorten the harvest period and affect yield.  There are a few things that the backyard grower, community gardener and urban farmer can do to keep their tomato plants healthy and productive though heavy rain periods.

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Make a Withdrawal from your Soil Weed Seed Bank: Stale Seedbank Technique

Originally posted on the VegNet Newsletter

 

Ah spring!  The war against weeds begins anew. The first major skirmish of the growing season should happen before planting. The stale seed bed technique is an often over-looked practice that can be used before planting. It works by first encouraging weeds to sprout and then killing them when they are young and most vulnerable. For organic growers, a stale seed bed can replace the effects of a pre-emergence herbicide. And when used properly, it can contribute to both short-term and long-term weed management

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Yellow Fields Forever

By: Jow Boggs, OSU Extension Educator

Originally posted on Buckeye Yard and Garden onLine- May 18, 2019

Cressleaf Groundsel

The dichotomous nature of cressleaf groundsel (a.k.a. butterweed) (Packera glabella; syn. Senecio glabellus) tests the tolerance of lovers of native wildflowers.  On one hand, a sea of golden-yellow flowers carpeting farm fields in Ohio provides welcome relief from highway monotony.  On the other hand, upright 2 – 3′ tall plants dominating Ohio landscapes presents a weed management challenge.

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Annual Maple Leaf-Drop

By: Jow Bogs, OSU Extension Educator, Originally posted on Buckeye Yard and Garden Online
Published on
Maple Petiole Borer
Finding large numbers of green leaves littering the ground beneath maple trees wouldn’t be a surprise given the recent high winds and heavy rains over much of Ohio.  However, you should take a second look at this time of the year for short petioles on the shed leaves and broken petioles remaining attached to the tree.  Both are tell-tale symptoms of the maple petiole borer (Caulocampus acericaulis).

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