Knox County Soybean Seeding Rate – Trial #2

A BIG thank you to Jim & Susan Braddock for allowing me to put two of my Soybean Seeding Rate trials on their farm this year!

 

The results are shown in the tables below.

The 2018 report is now available in both a print and e-version. To receive a printed copy, stop by the Knox County Extension office.  The e-version can be viewed and downloaded here at go.osu.edu/eFields.

Knox County Soybean Starter Fertilizer Trial

A BIG thank you to David & Emily Mitchem for allowing me to put my Soybean Starter Fertilizer trial on their farm this year!

 

The results are listed in the tables below.

The 2018 report is now available in both a print and e-version. To receive a printed copy, stop by the Knox County Extension office.  The e-version can be viewed and downloaded here at go.osu.edu/eFields.

New Requirements For Dicamba Use

Revised label and new training required before use in 2019

If you are planning to use Engenia (BASF), XtendiMax (Monsanto) and FeXapan (DuPont) in 2019 there are major changes to the labels for the products that you need to be aware of.  The biggest change is only license applicators can purchase, mix, load, apply or clean application equipment.  Previously these tasks could have been completed by an unlicensed applicator if they were “supervision by a certified applicator”.  Below is the ODA news release pertaining to the new regulations.

REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio (Jan. 16, 2019) – The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is reminding farmers of revised labels and new training requirements for applicators who intend to use dicamba herbicide products this year. In October 2018, U.S. EPA approved revised labels for the three dicamba products that are labeled for use on soybeans: Engenia (BASF), XtendiMax (Monsanto) and FeXapan (DuPont).

“Like any other product, we want to ensure licensed applicators are properly following label directions as they get ready for this growing season,” said Matt Beal, chief of the ODA Division of Plant Health. “This not only helps ensure the safe use of pesticides, it also helps prevent misuse and mishandling.”

The manufacturers of these dicamba products also agreed to additional requirements for their products. Some of the requirements include:

  • 2019 labels supersede all prior labels for these products. Applicators must obtain a copy of the new label and must have that label in their possession at the time of use
  • Only certified applicators may purchase and apply the products
    • Those operating under the supervision of a certified applicator may no longer purchase or apply.
    • Anyone who mixes, loads or cleans dicamba application equipment must become licensed.
    • ODA will host additional “Dicamba Ag Only” exams in February and March for those looking to become a certified applicator. Visit agri.ohio.gov for more details.
  • Applicators must complete dicamba-specific training
  • Increased recordkeeping requirements
  • Wind speed restrictions
  • Temperature inversion restrictions
  • Sensitive/susceptible crop consultation
  • Spray system equipment clean-out

More details on these revisions can be found in the attached fact sheet. Applicators looking for a list of ODA-approved trainings can visit www.agri.ohio.gov. For questions, applicators can contact the ODA Pesticide and Fertilizer Regulation Section at 614-728-6987 or pesticides@agri.ohio.gov.

Dealing with the Weather and Unharvested Crops

Source: Penn State Extension (Edited)

WHAT A FALL!!!  According to the November 26 Crop Weather Report, approximately 14% of corn and 10% of beans still in the field.  The average moisture content of corn harvested last week was 17 percent and the average for soybeans was 16 percent, how big of a concern is this?

The weather continues to be unpredictable and give challenges to operators with grain and crops still in the field. Snow and ice over the last couple weeks have just been the latest in a long list of hurdles that growers have had to overcome this season. With some careful thought and planning you can still have a successfully harvest.

Having corn in the field now can be a double-edged sword. The longer it stays out, the dryer the corn will be when harvested, thus decreasing your drying costs. However, there is a higher risk of yield loss the longer the corn stays unharvested. Research on winter corn drydown showed that over a five-year span, corn grain would lose roughly 40% of its moisture between the months of October and December, when left in the field. The tradeoff is that we cannot anticipate the weather. The same study found that a single year yield decreased by 45% and another year decreased by only 5%.

Another concern of unharvested corn could be disease and mold. When discussing disease and mold, snow and ice pose no more danger to your crop than rain does. A positive of this situation is that the lower temperatures could have a limiting effect on pathogens’ ability to incubate or develop. A drawback of having laying snow is an increased opportunity for lodging. This year we have already seen a lot of lodging due to stem rots and adding snow to the mix may increase this risk. The risk of lodging is even further increased when coupled with winter winds and snow and ice to come. The takeaway is that disease and mold issues should not be your largest concern right now.

If you have a large amount of stock rot and lodging, harvesting as soon as possible will be best for a successful harvest. If your corn crop has lodged, one thing to remember is that this is not a usual harvest. Special consideration and care must be taken to get acceptable yields, which means slowing down and using caution. A few other options you have for getting a better harvestable yield are combining in the opposite direction, or “against the grain.” This will allow the head to get under the crop and lift it up. Another option is to use a corn reel. A corn reel is a specialized piece of equipment that mounts on the top of your corn head and uses rotating hooks to lift the corn and allow the head to get under the lodged crop.

The last concern is compaction and rutting of fields … Who Doesn’t Have Compaction Issues This Year??  Compaction will linger for years and will require attention to avoid problems with next year’s crop.

 

Precautions for Dicamba use in Xtend Soybean

Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois are heavily infested with weeds resistant to glyphosate (group 9), PPO inhibitors (group 14), and ALS inhibitors (group 2). This has greatly reduced the number of effective postemergence herbicides for controlling these weeds in Roundup Ready 2 (RR2) soybeans. Adoption of Roundup Ready 2 Xtend (glyphosate and dicamba resistant – RR2 Xtend) soybeans and use of dicamba-based herbicides is one option for managing resistant weed populations. Keep in mind that selection for dicamba resistance occurs each time dicamba is applied, and over reliance on this technology will lead to the development of dicamba-resistant weed populations.

The extension weed science programs at The Ohio State University, Purdue University, and the University of Illinois recently collaborated to revise suggestions and precautions for use of dicamba in dicamba-resistant soybean.  The United States Environmental Protection Agency renewed labels of Xtendimax, Engenia, and FeXapan last October, and this updated extension weed science publication offers additional suggestions to help further reduce off-target dicamba movement.

Click here to view the publication

Drying and storing wet soybeans

Source: Michael Staton, Michigan State University Extension

Due to the cool and wet conditions, soybeans harvested at this time of the year will need to be dried on the farm or at the elevator. Some elevators will accept soybeans up to 18 percent moisture while others will reject loads that are above 15 percent moisture. Contact your elevator prior to delivery and understand their discount schedule. Information on understanding soybean discount schedules is available in “Understanding soybean discount schedules” from Michigan State University Extension.

Commodity soybeans used for domestic crush or export can be dried using supplemental heat. However, food grade and seed beans should not be dried with supplemental heat. Proper management is essential to minimizing damage when using supplemental heat. Keep the drying temperature below 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Click here to read more.

 

Understanding soybean discount schedules

Source: Michael Staton, Michigan State University Extension

 

Every elevator that receives soybeans has a discount schedule. Discount schedules are important because they communicate how and when various shrink factors and discounts are applied at delivery. Discount schedules vary from elevator to elevator and can be somewhat confusing. This article lists and explains the major shrink and discount factors pertaining to soybeans and provides examples of shrink and discount calculations.

Test weight

Test weight is a measure of density (mass/volume) and is measured in pounds per bushel. The standard test weight of 60 pounds per bushel is always used to convert the scale weight of soybean loads to the number of bushels contained in the load. This is true even if the actual test weight of the load is lower than 60 pounds per bushel. Therefore, test weight does not impact the number of saleable bushels harvested from a defined area (acre or field). However, most grain buyers will begin discounting soybean loads when the test weight falls below 54 pounds per bushel. Discounts are applied to the gross weight of the load before shrink factors are applied. The only advantage of having test weights higher than 54 pounds per bushel is that the beans will take up less volume in storage and during transportation.

Read more click here.

 

2018 Ohio Soybean Performance Trials – All Yield Results Available

Source: Dr. Laura Lindsey

Yield results from all three regions (north, central, and south) are now available online as a pdf at: https://stepupsoy.osu.edu/soybean-production/variety-selection/ohio-soybean-performance-trial Grain quality results and sortable tables will be available in November.

Average yield for the Ohio Soybean Performance Trials by location and trial (early and late) for 2017 and 2018 is shown in the table below. Soybean yield in the north region (Henry and Sandusky County) was much greater in 2018 compared to 2017. (Yield from Henry County was not reported in 2017 due to extremely wet weather causing yield to be variable.) In the central region, soybeans in the early trial yielded greater in 2018 compared to 2018. However, in the late trial, soybean yield slightly decreased in 2018 compared to 2017. Yield in the south region was variable with Preble County yielding less in 2018 compared to 2017 while Clinton County yielded greater in 2018.