The Economic Value of Applying Fall Poultry Litter

by: Jordan Shockley, University of Kentucky Assistant Extension Professor

Spring application of poultry litter is ideal for maximizing the economic value of poultry litter but faces challenges that include wet soil conditions, lack of time to spread litter near planting, and availability of poultry litter in the spring. Therefore, it is a common practice in Kentucky to apply poultry litter in the fall. While not optimal from an economic, agronomic, or environmental perspective, producers still need to understand the economic value from applying poultry litter in the fall.

Poultry litter applied in the fall to fallow cropland will suffer from ammonium volatilization and leaching resulting in little to no nitrogen available to the crop come spring. This results in an economic value less than if applied in the spring. To evaluate the economic value of poultry litter applied in the fall, first assume that soil test recommendations indicate the need for phosphorus and potassium. Also, assume that “as received” poultry litter has a nutrient content of 50 lbs of nitrogen, 56 lbs of phosphorus, and 47 lbs of potassium (average for Kentucky). With current fertilizer prices of $399/ton for anhydrous ($0.24/lb N), $418/ton for DAP ($0.36/lb P2O5) and $316/ton for potash ($0.26/lb K2O), the expected value of poultry litter applied to fallow cropland in the fall is $29/ton. This value should cover the price paid for the poultry litter, transport, and application to compete with commercial fertilizer when applied in the fall. The value of poultry litter increases to $33/ton if it is spread in the fall to cropland that has a cover crop planted. Both fall poultry litter prices are lower compared to 2016. This is directly attributed to the decrease in nitrogen prices from $0.32/lb to $0.24/lb. This decrease value was slightly offset by small increases in both phosphorus and potassium prices.

If availability of poultry litter in the spring is a concern, stockpiling litter purchased in the fall can be an option if local, state and federal regulations allow. With the correct storage techniques and a properly staked litter pile, producers can expect minimum nutrient loss for spring application. If the same commercial fertilizer prices hold, the average poultry litter in Kentucky would have a value of $36/ton if properly stored and applied in the spring.

The value of poultry litter differs in the fall if applied to pastures or land for hay production. If applying poultry litter to an established stand of alfalfa with a legume mix of <25% of the stand, the average poultry litter in Kentucky at current commercial fertilizer prices has a value of $40/ton. The value of poultry litter will vary based on grass type, established stands vs. new seeding/renovation, and whether the land is used for hay, pasture, or silage.

Since the value of poultry litter is dynamic and always changing, decision tools have been developed so producers can enter soil test data, nutrient content of measured litter, commercial fertilizer prices, and management practices of poultry litter applied to determine the value. Tools for applying poultry litter to both grain crops and land in hay/pasture/silage are available and can be found on my website at the following link: http://www.uky.edu/Ag/AgEcon/shockley_jordan.php

Fall Fertility – Tri-State Fertility Phosphorus Tables

by: John Barker

As harvest winds down and “IF” the fields ever dry out many of us will turn our attention to fall fertilizer applications.  We can still submit soil samples.  The turnaround time is approximately 5 -10 days, usually closer to 5.  The cost for a standard Ag sample is $10 + postage.

We are always willing to help you with your fertilizer recommendations.  The following tables are adopted from the Ohio State University Tri-State Fertilizer Recommendations.  To utilize these tables you must first know what units are used with the P value (i.e. Pounds/acre or Parts Per Million (PPM)).  Secondly you will need to know what extractant is being used Bray P-1 or Mehlich III (M 3).

Currently the lab we use reports P values utilizing M3 and PPM.  Table 13 contains the recommendations for corn and Table 15 shows the soybean recommendations.

 

 

 

 

 

For example if you have a field with a corn yield goal of 170 bu./ac., a soybean yield goal of 60 bu./ac. and a soil test report from our lab with a P value of 35 (M3, PPM) our recommendation would be as follows: Corn – 65 lbs./ac. and Soybeans – 50 lbs./ac.

If MAP (11-52-0) is your fertilizer of choice, you would apply 125 lbs/ac. (65/.52) for your corn crop and 96 lbs/ac. (50/.52) for your bean crop.  This application can be applied before each crop or combined into one application of 225 lbs/ac. for both crops.

 

Fall Fertility – Crop Removal Rates

by: John Barker

As harvest winds down and “IF” the fields ever dry out many of us will turn our attention to fall fertilizer applications.  We can still submit soil samples.  The turnaround time is approximately 5 -10 days, usually closer to 5.  The cost for a standard Ag sample is $10 + postage.

We are always willing to help you with your fertilizer recommendations.  The following tables may also be of assistance.

Table 12 shows the approximate amounts of nutrients removed in each harvested unit of a crop.  A 60 bushel per acre soybean crop would need 48 pounds (60 bu. X .80) of Phosphorous and 84 pounds (60 X 1.40) of Potassium per acre just to replenish the nutrients removed this year.

Likewise, a 90 bushel per acre wheat crop with the straw removed (baled) would need 65 pounds of Phosphorus (90 X  .72(.63+.09)) and 115 pounds (90 X 1.28 (.37 + .91)) of Potassium.