Evaluating the Prevent Plant Option

By: Eric Richer & Chris Bruynis, OSU Extension Educators

Planting progress goes differently every year and in each part of the state. This year is no different in Ohio. Some places got in early and are finished. Others had their ‘normal’ planting progress with ‘normal’ Mother Nature breaks, perhaps with some re-plant needed. And still others have not had ideal conditions all spring to plant.  As such, we have received some recent calls regarding the mechanics and economics of utilizing the Prevent Plant through crop insurance this year in certain parts of the state. First and foremost, we are not crop insurance agents, so speaking with your agent is of utmost importance. In this article, we will walk through an example on the economics of electing Prevent Plant.

In Ohio, once you arrive at the final plant date of June 5 for corn (already passed) and June 20 for soybeans, you basically have 3 options in a corn scenario: Continue reading

Xyway Corn Fungicide Trial

Knox County Xyway Trials

Taking stand counts at our Xyway plot – Great looking field of corn!

 

 

A Special Thanks to Ed & Vicki Piar!!

 

The goal of this study is to determine corn’s response to an at-plant soil application of flutriafol (Xyway™) fungicide. Information from this trial will be used to improve corn disease management recommendations for growers throughout the state.

Vomitoxin Research 2022 – Plot #4

Knox County Vomitoxin Research Station #4 Installed – Thanks to Dr. Pierce Paul and Crew!

A Special Thanks to Braddock Farms – Jim and Susan Braddock!!

 

Fusarium molds that produce DON often develop under wet weather conditions. This particular mold initially enters plants through silks or wounds, and cool, wet conditions during the silking stage promotes spore production, increasing the inoculum load that can potentially infect more plants. Infections by the fungal species F. graminearum result in the development of Gibberella ear and stalk rots. Corn from fields with this disease issue may need to be tested for potential contamination.

The goal of this Statewide research project is to develop a prediction model that will allow producers to take corrective action based upon a weather prediction model to prevent plant infections.

40 of these research stations are scattered throughout West-Central Ohio.

Vomitoxin Research 2022 – Plot #3

Knox County Vomitoxin Research Station #3 Installed – Thanks to Dr. Pierce Paul and Crew!

A Special Thanks to Clark Farms – Tom and Nate Clark!!

 

Fusarium molds that produce DON often develop under wet weather conditions. This particular mold initially enters plants through silks or wounds, and cool, wet conditions during the silking stage promotes spore production, increasing the inoculum load that can potentially infect more plants. Infections by the fungal species F. graminearum result in the development of Gibberella ear and stalk rots. Corn from fields with this disease issue may need to be tested for potential contamination.

The goal of this Statewide research project is to develop a prediction model that will allow producers to take corrective action based upon a weather prediction model to prevent plant infections.

40 of these research stations are scattered throughout West-Central Ohio.

Vomitoxin Research 2022 – Plot #2

Knox County Vomitoxin Research Station #2 Installed – Thanks to Dr. Pierce Paul and Crew!

 

A Special Thanks to David and Emily Mitchem!!

 

Fusarium molds that produce DON often develop under wet weather conditions. This particular mold initially enters plants through silks or wounds, and cool, wet conditions during the silking stage promotes spore production, increasing the inoculum load that can potentially infect more plants. Infections by the fungal species F. graminearum result in the development of Gibberella ear and stalk rots. Corn from fields with this disease issue may need to be tested for potential contamination.

The goal of this Statewide research project is to develop a prediction model that will allow producers to take corrective action based upon a weather prediction model to prevent plant infections.

40 of these research stations are scattered throughout West-Central Ohio.

Vomitoxin Research 2022 – Plot #1

Knox County Vomitoxin Research Station #1 Installed – Thanks to Dr. Pierce Paul and Crew!

 

A Special Thanks to Sassafras Hill Farms – Nate McKee and Skyler Epler!!

 

Fusarium molds that produce DON often develop under wet weather conditions. This particular mold initially enters plants through silks or wounds, and cool, wet conditions during the silking stage promotes spore production, increasing the inoculum load that can potentially infect more plants. Infections by the fungal species F. graminearum result in the development of Gibberella ear and stalk rots. Corn from fields with this disease issue may need to be tested for potential contamination.

The goal of this Statewide research project is to develop a prediction model that will allow producers to take corrective action based upon a weather prediction model to prevent plant infections.

40 of these research stations are scattered throughout West-Central Ohio.

Rainfast Intervals, Spray Additives, and Crop Size for Postemergence Soybean Herbicides

Mother nature is finally cooperating, allowing us to get some corn and beans in the ground.  Later this summer it will be time for postemergence herbicide applications.  The table below from the “2022 Weed Control Guide” lists important information on rainfast intervals, spray additives and crop size  for soybean postemergence applications.Click on the table to print a camera ready copy

 

Rainfast Intervals, Spray Additives, and Crop Size for Postemergence Corn Herbicides

Mother nature is finally cooperating, allowing us to get some corn and beans in the ground.  Later this summer it will be time for postemergence herbicide applications.  The table below from the “2022 Weed Control Guide” lists important information on rainfast intervals, spray additives and crop size  for corn postemergence applications.

 

 

Click on each page to print a camera ready copy

 

Kill Poison Hemlock Now

 

– Christine Gelley, Agriculture and Natural Resources Educator, Noble County OSU Extension

Poison hemlock is a concern in public right of ways, on the farm, and in the landscape!

Poison hemlock has already emerged in a vegetative state around Noble County and beyond. Soon it will be bolting and blooming on stalks 6-10 feet tall. All parts of the plant are toxic to all classes of livestock if consumed and is prevalent along roadsides, ditches, and crop field borders. It is a biennial weed that does not flower in the first year of growth but flowers in the second year. The earlier you can address poison hemlock with mowing and/or herbicide application, the better your control methods will be.

Poison hemlock is related to Queen Anne’s lace, but is much larger and taller, emerges earlier, and has purple spots on the stems. Another relative that is poisonous is wild parsnip, which looks similar to poison hemlock, but has yellow flowers. Giant hogweed is another relative of poison hemlock that is also toxic. All of these plants have umbel shaped clusters of flowers.

Continue reading

Early Season Wheat Diseases and Fungicides

By: Dr. Pierce Paul, OSU Extension

The wheat crop in Ohio is now between early boot (Feekes 10, in the south) and approaching Feekes 8 (flag leaf emergence) in northern counties. Cooler-than-usual conditions over the last few weeks have slowed the crop down considerably, but as temperatures increase, the crop will advance through several growth stages over a relatively short period. Cool conditions have also kept foliar diseases in check, but Septoria, and to a lesser extent, powdery mildew are still showing up in some fields. Septoria tritici leaf spot is favored by cool, wet conditions similar to those experienced over the last several weeks. It usually shows up first on the lower leaves as yellowish flecks that later develop into irregularly-shaped, brownish-gray lesions, with easily-seen dark-brown to black spots (called pycnidia) in the center. Cool temperatures and high relative humidity are also required for the development of powdery mildew. Typical symptoms of powdery mildew are whitish fungal growth (pustules) on the surface of leaves and stems. If the variety is susceptible and conditions continue to be favorable, a fungicide application may be warranted to prevent both diseases from reaching the flag leaf before grain-fill.

Septoria tritici leaf spot on wheat – note the black dots (pycnidia) inside the lesion.

Most of the fungicides commonly used on wheat are rated as very good or excellent against Septoria and good or very good against powdery mildew. See the attached chart for fungicide options and efficacy. Remember,

Powdery mildew on wheat leaf – as the name suggests, note the powdery, white pustules.

always read and follow the labels when making an application. For both diseases, a single application between Feekes 8 and Feekes 10 would be sufficient to protect the flag leaf and minimize yield loss. However, applications made at these early growth stages will not provide adequate control of late-season diseases like head scab and Stagonospora glume blotch. So, you should scout fields before making your fungicide application decisions. If powder mildew and Septoria levels are low as the crop approaches heading (Feekes 10.5), you may be better off waiting to treat fields at anthesis (Feekes), as this will help to suppress head scab, which is still the most damaging and important disease of wheat in Ohio, while at the same time provide very good control of Septoria, powdery mildew, and late-season diseases such as Stagonospora and rust.