Artificial Intelligence – How Is It Going To Change Our Industry?

Knox County’s 1st Autonomous Tractor

Only 33 days until the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium – Register now!

We are in the midst of unique and exciting times, when agriculture is transforming from the “old” precision agriculture to the era of artificial intelligence.  Artificial intelligence (AI) is a technology that exhibits behavior that could be interpreted as human intelligence. Can we apply artificial intelligence in agriculture? Can a computer be better than man in making decisions.  Can an algorithm beat farmer’s gut instinct and experience?

In recent years, agriculture has gone through a major revolution. From being one of the most traditional sectors, it has become one of the most progressive ones.

Artificial Intelligence will be a part of may presentations at the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium.  This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

 

 

New Farm Bill

 

Agriculture is one of Ohio’s most important industries, contributing more than $100 billion to our economy and putting food on the table for thousands of Ohio workers and people around the world.

The new farm bill was signed by President Trump Yesterday.  The link below will take you to the Senate Ag Committee’s title by title summary.

https://www.agriculture.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Conference%20Report%20Summaries.pdf

 

 

Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production

Only 33 days until the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium – Register now!

Big Data is one of the current “buzz words’ in precision agriculture.

We can easily fill computer hard drives with the data we are able to collect today.  Just last year the Ohio State Precision Ag Team set a world record for the amount of data collected (18.4 gigabytes) from one corn plant during the growing season.  How much is 18.4 gigabytes?  Think of it this way.  According to the Ohio Country Journal, if you were to collect that much data per plant in a 100 acre field, you would need 360 million file cabinets to store all the data.

Our challenge today is to sort through all the data to determine the amount and type of data we are capable of managing.  Dr. John Fulton will address some of these issue in his presentation – “Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production” at the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium.

The event, hosted by Ohio State University Extension – Knox County and Ag Info Tech will take place Jan. 16 in Waldo, Ohio, at All Occasions Catering. Doors for registration will open at 8:30 a.m.  Lessiter Media’s Jack Zemlicka address the current adoption trends in precision ag and insights gained from farmers, dealers and manufacturers on where the industry is headed.

Other morning topics include:

  • What Will New Datum Changes Mean to Precision Agriculture, Jeff Jalbrzikowski
  • Artificial Intelligence – How is it going to change Our Industry, Tim Norris

Included between these presentations will be time for attendees to meet with sponsors of the events. Following the last presentation, there will be an hour-long lunch break.

After lunch, attendees will be able to go to breakout sessions on topics ranging from manufacturing and technology to data/software updates. The event will finish with a closing presentation from Dr. Scott Shearer on the future of precision agriculture.

This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

Developing a long-term comprehensive weed management system – Part 2

Source: Iowa State University, (Edited)

Post 2 of a 4 post series.

As the end of the year approaches and we reflect on the 2018 growing season we need to look at what changes or improvements we need to make in our production plans for 2019.  Herbicide resistant weeds are continuing to create problems.  New, very invasive and harmful weed species (Palmer Amaranth and Waterhemp) are now prevalent in Knox County.  Therefore, a review of the effectiveness of your herbicides program is definitely in order.

To effectively battle these new weed problems, creating a comprehensive, all-encompassing weed control strategy is essential in today production agriculture.  Over the next 4 weeks I will share information developed by Meaghan Anderson and Dr. Bob Hartzler at Iowa State University on developing a long-term weed management system.

Last week’s post:   Herbicide program development: Using multiple sites of action

This week’s post: Herbicide program development: Using effective herbicide groups

After you’ve started working on a program that contains multiple herbicide groups (sites of action), you need to make sure you’re using multiple herbicide groups that will be effective against your target weeds. For most people, the target weed will be waterhemp. Others may have problems with giant ragweed, horseweed/marestail, or other weeds. Waterhemp is the target weed in my example, but consider what your most problematic weeds are to run through this exercise for yourself.

Things to consider when determining whether a herbicide is effective against your target weed include (1) whether the herbicide is labeled to control the weed and (2) whether your target weed is resistant to the herbicide group.

Let’s look at herbicides as if waterhemp is the weed that causes us the most issues. Here’s a table of herbicide groups used in Iowa crops.

Continue reading

Lessiter Media Editor to Deliver Kick-off Address at 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium

Only 40 days until the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium – Register now!

Lessiter Media’s Jack Zemlicka will be delivering the first presentation during the 2019 Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium. Zemlicka will address the current adoption trends in precision ag and insights gained from farmers, dealers and manufacturers on where the industry is headed.

The event, hosted by Ohio State University Extension – Knox County and Ag Info Tech will take place Jan. 16 in Waldo, Ohio, at All Occasions Catering. Doors for registration will open at 8:30 a.m. Zemlicka’s presentation, Precision Agriculture Adoption, will follow the 9 a.m. welcome address. Following him, there will be three more presentations in the first half of the day:

  • Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production, Dr. John Fulton
  • What Will New Datum Changes Mean to Precision Agriculture, Jeff Jalbrzikowski
  • Artificial Intelligence – How is it going to change Our Industry, Tim Norris

Included between these presentations will be time for attendees to meet with sponsors of the events. Following the last presentation, there will be an hour-long lunch break.

After lunch, attendees will be able to go to breakout sessions on topics ranging from manufacturing and technology to data/software updates. The event will finish with a closing presentation from Dr. Scott Shearer on the future of precision agriculture.

This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

Dealing with the Weather and Unharvested Crops

Source: Penn State Extension (Edited)

WHAT A FALL!!!  According to the November 26 Crop Weather Report, approximately 14% of corn and 10% of beans still in the field.  The average moisture content of corn harvested last week was 17 percent and the average for soybeans was 16 percent, how big of a concern is this?

The weather continues to be unpredictable and give challenges to operators with grain and crops still in the field. Snow and ice over the last couple weeks have just been the latest in a long list of hurdles that growers have had to overcome this season. With some careful thought and planning you can still have a successfully harvest.

Having corn in the field now can be a double-edged sword. The longer it stays out, the dryer the corn will be when harvested, thus decreasing your drying costs. However, there is a higher risk of yield loss the longer the corn stays unharvested. Research on winter corn drydown showed that over a five-year span, corn grain would lose roughly 40% of its moisture between the months of October and December, when left in the field. The tradeoff is that we cannot anticipate the weather. The same study found that a single year yield decreased by 45% and another year decreased by only 5%.

Another concern of unharvested corn could be disease and mold. When discussing disease and mold, snow and ice pose no more danger to your crop than rain does. A positive of this situation is that the lower temperatures could have a limiting effect on pathogens’ ability to incubate or develop. A drawback of having laying snow is an increased opportunity for lodging. This year we have already seen a lot of lodging due to stem rots and adding snow to the mix may increase this risk. The risk of lodging is even further increased when coupled with winter winds and snow and ice to come. The takeaway is that disease and mold issues should not be your largest concern right now.

If you have a large amount of stock rot and lodging, harvesting as soon as possible will be best for a successful harvest. If your corn crop has lodged, one thing to remember is that this is not a usual harvest. Special consideration and care must be taken to get acceptable yields, which means slowing down and using caution. A few other options you have for getting a better harvestable yield are combining in the opposite direction, or “against the grain.” This will allow the head to get under the crop and lift it up. Another option is to use a corn reel. A corn reel is a specialized piece of equipment that mounts on the top of your corn head and uses rotating hooks to lift the corn and allow the head to get under the lodged crop.

The last concern is compaction and rutting of fields … Who Doesn’t Have Compaction Issues This Year??  Compaction will linger for years and will require attention to avoid problems with next year’s crop.

 

Developing a long-term comprehensive weed management system.

Source: Iowa State University, (Edited)

As the end of the year approaches and we reflect on the 2018 growing season we need to look at what changes or improvements we need to make in our production plans for 2019.  Herbicide resistant weeds are continuing to create problems.  New, very invasive and harmful weed species (Palmer Amaranth and Waterhemp) are now prevalent in Knox County.  Therefore, a review of the effectiveness of your herbicides program is definitely in order.

To effectively battle these new weed problems, creating a comprehensive, all-encompassing weed control strategy is essential in today production agriculture.  Over the next 4 weeks I will share information developed by Meaghan Anderson and Dr. Bob Hartzler at Iowa State University on developing a long-term weed management system.

This week’s post:   Herbicide program development: Using multiple sites of action

With the stagnant development of new herbicides and weeds seemingly evolving herbicide resistance faster than ever before, it’s important to maximize the usefulness of every herbicide application. A new herbicide site of action (or herbicide group number) for use in corn and soybean production has not been discovered since the early 1980s. According to Dr. Ian Heap with www.weedscience.org, since the 1980s, the confirmed number of unique cases of herbicide resistance globally is increasing at a rate of about 12 discoveries per year.

Continue reading

Farm Bill Deal Includes Key Commodity Program Changes

Source: AgWeb.com

Key changes:

  • Adjusted loan rates
  • Annual choice between ARC and PLC
  • Opportunity to update yield data
  • Grassland to be removed from base acres

The four key ag committee leaders announced agreement in principle on a final farm bill Thursday. That deal includes some key changes to the Commodity Title of the bill, including adjustments sought by farm groups, according to Pro Farmer Washington Analyst Jim Wiesemeyer.

The first key change according to Wiesemeyer comes in a provision to increase loan rates while allowing for an annual election between the Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs. Under the previous farm bill, growers made a single selection between the two programs for the life of the farm bill.

Click here to read more ….