Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium

The Central Ohio Precision Ag Symposium will be held on Wednesday, January 16, 2019 at All Occasions Catering 6986 Waldo-Delaware Rd., Waldo Ohio from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.  This year’s program will feature the most current technologies available in precision agriculture. These topics will be shared by some of the leading university and industry Precision Ag experts.

This year’s program opens with a discussion regarding where we are in Precision Ag today – “The Adoption of Precision Ag Technologies” – Jack Zemlicka, Ag Division Content Director Lessiter Media and ends with a look into the crystal ball – “The Future of Precision Ag” – Dr. Scott Shearer, The Ohio State University.

Data management is a “hot “topic in today’s precision agriculture.  Dr. John Fulton will share his insights on “Data Considerations in Today’s Crop Production”.  You will learn about data security and who can/has access to your data at afternoon breakout sessions from Climate-Fieldview, Agleader–Agfinity, and My JohnDeere.  Learn about the value of your data and opportunities for selling your data at one of the Farm Mobile breakout sessions.

Artificial intelligence is changing our industry.  Tim Norris will discuss “AI” and share insights from Knox County’s first autonomous tractor.  “AI” will be part of several other afternoon breakout sessions as well.  New datum changes are scheduled for 2022.  Jeff Jalbrzikowski will explain how this change could potentially affect our current maps and GPS positioning files.

To be the premier source of research-based information in the age of digital agriculture” is the vision of the Ohio State Digital Ag Program.  Dr. Elizabeth Hawkins will discuss the nearly 100 OSU on-farm research trials conducted throughout Ohio in 2018.  Everyone in attendance will receive a copy of the 2018 eFields Report.

Afternoon breakout sessions will include manufacturing and technology updates including how to get the most from your in-cab displays from John Deere, Case IH AFS, Precision Planting, Capstan, AGCO, New Holland and Soil Max.

$50 registration fee includes a buffet lunch, breaks and a notebook containing all presentations.  Seating is limited, registration deadline is December 28, 2018.

This symposium will provide up to 11.5 Continuing Education Credits (CEU’s) for Certified Crop Advisors,

S&W – .5, I.P.M. – 5.5, C.M. – 5.5.

This program is sponsored by The Ohio State University Extension, AgInfoTech, Advantage Ag & Equipment, Ag Leader, B&B Farm Service, Beck’s, Capstan, Centerra Co-op, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Channel, Clark Seeds, Climate Corp., Evolution Ag, Farm Credit Services, Farm Mobile, First Knox National Bank,  JD Equipment,  Ohio Ag Equipment, Precision Planting, Seed Consultants, Smart Ag and Soil-Max.

For more information or to download registration form, go to http://u.osu.edu/knoxcountyag/2018/11/28/central-ohio-pre…ion-ag-symposium/ or

https://knox.osu.edu/news/central-ohio-precision-ag-symposium or contact the OSU Extension Office in Knox County at 740-397-0401 or AgInfoTech 740-507-2503.

Click here for agenda and registration information: CentralOhioPrecisionAg19 FNL-2nc71zi

Inversion and Drift Mitigation – Workshop on December 14

Inversion and Drift Mitigation Workshop
Dec. 14, 2018 • 10 a.m. – noon

10 – 11 a.m. Weather Conditions and Potential Inversions
Speaker: Aaron Wilson, Weather Specialist & Atmospheric Scientist, OSU Extension, Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center

11 – noon Using FieldWatch to Communicate
Speaker: Jared Shaffer, Plant Health Inspector, Ohio Department of Agriculture

Two choices for attending the workshop:

Attend in person (pre-registration required, limited to the first 75 people registered)
Ohio Dept. of Agriculture • Bromfield Administration Building
8995 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, OH 43068
Click here to register

Attend virtually:
Link coming soon – no pre-registration required

No cost to attend. Core commercial and private pesticide recertification credits available only athe Reynoldsburg in-person location. Limited to the first 75 registered. No recertification credits given for virtual/internet attendees.

For more information about the workshop, contact:
Cindy Folck, folck.2@osu.edu
614-247-7898

Event sponsored by OSU Extension IPM program and the USDA NIFA Crop Protection and Pest Management Competitive Grants Program (Grant number 2017-70006-27174).

 

Ohio Crop Weather

The wet fall continues!  Yes, this sounds like a broken record.  In my 28 years in Knox County I cannot remember a fall that has been this wet – our soils have been saturated all fall.  I saw a weather report this weekend stating that we are more than 15 inches of rain above our yearly average.

On the bright side if we can get our crops out of the field, many of you that I have talked with think that we may have a record year for BOTH corn and soybean yields.

Below is the most recent Ohio Crop Weather Report.

Precautions for Dicamba use in Xtend Soybean

Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois are heavily infested with weeds resistant to glyphosate (group 9), PPO inhibitors (group 14), and ALS inhibitors (group 2). This has greatly reduced the number of effective postemergence herbicides for controlling these weeds in Roundup Ready 2 (RR2) soybeans. Adoption of Roundup Ready 2 Xtend (glyphosate and dicamba resistant – RR2 Xtend) soybeans and use of dicamba-based herbicides is one option for managing resistant weed populations. Keep in mind that selection for dicamba resistance occurs each time dicamba is applied, and over reliance on this technology will lead to the development of dicamba-resistant weed populations.

The extension weed science programs at The Ohio State University, Purdue University, and the University of Illinois recently collaborated to revise suggestions and precautions for use of dicamba in dicamba-resistant soybean.  The United States Environmental Protection Agency renewed labels of Xtendimax, Engenia, and FeXapan last October, and this updated extension weed science publication offers additional suggestions to help further reduce off-target dicamba movement.

Click here to view the publication

Landowner’s Evidence Not Determinative in CAUV Tax Appeal According to Ohio Supreme Court

Source: Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Agricultural and Resource Law Program

 

A landowner may present evidence regarding the value and acreage of his or her land, but the Board of Tax Appeals (BTA) is free to weigh that evidence as it wishes, according to the Ohio Supreme Court.  All seven justices agreed that the BTA in the case of Johnson v. Clark County Board of Revision acted with appropriate discretion, although two justices did not sign onto the reasoning as to why the BTA acted appropriately.  The case involved a property owner’s challenge of the Clark County Auditor’s determination of Current Agricultural Use Valuation (CAUV) for property tax purposes.

Click here to read more

Drying and storing wet soybeans

Source: Michael Staton, Michigan State University Extension

Due to the cool and wet conditions, soybeans harvested at this time of the year will need to be dried on the farm or at the elevator. Some elevators will accept soybeans up to 18 percent moisture while others will reject loads that are above 15 percent moisture. Contact your elevator prior to delivery and understand their discount schedule. Information on understanding soybean discount schedules is available in “Understanding soybean discount schedules” from Michigan State University Extension.

Commodity soybeans used for domestic crush or export can be dried using supplemental heat. However, food grade and seed beans should not be dried with supplemental heat. Proper management is essential to minimizing damage when using supplemental heat. Keep the drying temperature below 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

Click here to read more.

 

Understanding soybean discount schedules

Source: Michael Staton, Michigan State University Extension

 

Every elevator that receives soybeans has a discount schedule. Discount schedules are important because they communicate how and when various shrink factors and discounts are applied at delivery. Discount schedules vary from elevator to elevator and can be somewhat confusing. This article lists and explains the major shrink and discount factors pertaining to soybeans and provides examples of shrink and discount calculations.

Test weight

Test weight is a measure of density (mass/volume) and is measured in pounds per bushel. The standard test weight of 60 pounds per bushel is always used to convert the scale weight of soybean loads to the number of bushels contained in the load. This is true even if the actual test weight of the load is lower than 60 pounds per bushel. Therefore, test weight does not impact the number of saleable bushels harvested from a defined area (acre or field). However, most grain buyers will begin discounting soybean loads when the test weight falls below 54 pounds per bushel. Discounts are applied to the gross weight of the load before shrink factors are applied. The only advantage of having test weights higher than 54 pounds per bushel is that the beans will take up less volume in storage and during transportation.

Read more click here.

 

Save the Date


Save the Date!

The following meetings are scheduled for 2019

January 16 – Precision Ag Symposium – All Occasions Catering – Waldo

Featuring the most up-to-date information on Precision Ag Technologies

January 29 – Pesticide and Fertilizer Re-certification – 5:30 p.m.

1025 Harcourt Rd. Mt. Vernon

March 27 – Pesticide and Fertilizer Re-certification – 9:00 a.m.

1025 Harcourt Rd. Mt. Vernon

***Continue to check back for more information on these and other Winter Educational Events ***