Volunteering: a Teaching and a Learning Experience

This past week I was given the opportunity to volunteer within the STEM field while also influencing the generations of the future. With a Professor of Physics and three other STEM scholars, I was able to go into the inner city of Columbus and reach kids. I was able to show them the possibility of a future changing the world and not staying stuck in a loop of borderline poverty and living paycheck to paycheck.

This game project was not only a learning process for the children, but for me as well. I haven’t had a class that dealt with circuitry or electricity specifically in a few years. The idea was understandable to me in the finished product example. It is simple; you touch one wire to the other wire and the light glows.

When it came to the time that I had to explain the project to first, second and third graders, there was plenty of me learning along with the children. The experience was eye opening for me to the needs of volunteers compared to the knowledge of the leader.

A good leader needs to make sure that everyone is on the same page. In this case that could have meant asking all the volunteers to come 15 minutes earlier to build the circuit themselves to have a foundation of understanding.

This opportunity was far from perfect and allowed me the opportunity to stop, breathe, and go with the flow. I also realized the importance and clarity of having a plan written out with all the logistics, actions and notes from the leader. The everyone else can follow this and make sure everything goes to plan. I also realized the importance of a solid back up plan.

We had a powerpoint presentation for everyone to follow step by step through the project. It had pictures and added another level of understanding of the project for the kids and the volunteers. Unfortunately this tool was not cooperating, the projector would not work. The STEM students finally just started looking at the laptop for the instructions. This was a great plan to make sure that the kids were on track, but it pulled the volunteer’s attention from the children when they need supervision.

A solution to this problem in the project could be giving each volunteer a printout of the instructions that they could follow while staying right at the side of the children.

Over all, I truly enjoyed this volunteer experience. If I go again with this group I plan to be better prepared and ready for a action packed, eventful evening with many kids.

North Market Journey Artifact

The more time that I spend at The Ohio State University, the more I find that this college is a great place to begin to understand and launch oneself into the world. There are so many opportunities to meet new people, experience new things, and discover oneself. Just last Sunday the 30th of September, I was given the opportunity to explore Columbus, eat food, and meet new people. What a great combination!

We traveled just a few minutes south to the Short North and found the North Market. This wonderful place is full of many different venders. They have everything from a spice shop to a fresh fish vendor to BBQ to Thai noodles to funny cards to gift to people. This was not my first visit to the North Market and I headed straight for the bubble tea booth. Then I hit up the BBQ place next. It was all so good. My favorite part was getting to sit, eat and talk to everyone who made it.

As it goes, not everyone who signed up was able to make it. Our original group dwindled from 11 people to just 6, but this just made it easier to get to know everyone. Most people who attended the event were out of state students and were in the College of Food, Agriculture, and Environmental Science (FAES). I was the the exemption as the only in-state student. During lunch we were able to connect about experiences so far at OSU and talk about our survey class through FAES. This led to a long and riveting talk about diversity and perspectives on it. I find diversity to be an interesting conversation no matter who I am with. This dialog was another way we were able to connect, even through our differences.

 

I found this trip not only educational of the bus system (and how close the North Market is), but also a great way to meet new people who are more similar to me than not. I hope to go on more adventures like this. I look forward to building even more lasting memories through experiences like this one.

Year in Review

[ “Year in Review”  is where you should reflect on the past year and show how you have evolved as a person and as a student.  You may want to focus on your growth in a particular area (as a leader, scholar, researcher, etc.) or you may want to talk about your overall experience over the past year.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

G.O.A.L.S.

[ “G.O.A.L.S.” is a place where students write about how their planned, current, and future activities may fit into the Honors & Scholars G.O.A.L.S.: Global Awareness, Original Inquiry, Academic Enrichment, Leadership Development, and Service Engagement. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.

  • Global Awareness: Students cultivate and develop their appreciation for diversity and each individual’s unique differences. For example, consider course work, study abroad, involvement in cultural organizations or activities, etc.
  • Original Inquiry: Honors & Scholars students understand the research process by engaging in experiences ranging from in-class scholarly endeavors to creative inquiry projects to independent experiences with top researchers across campus and in the global community. For example, consider research, creative productions or performances, advanced course work, etc.
  • Academic Enrichment: Honors & Scholars students pursue academic excellence through rigorous curricular experiences beyond the university norm both in and out of the classroom.
  • Leadership Development: Honors & Scholars students develop leadership skills that can be demonstrated in the classroom, in the community, in their co-curricular activities, and in their future roles in society.
  • Service Engagement: Honors & Scholars students commit to service to the community.]

Career

[“Career” is where you can collect information about your experiences and skills that will apply to your future career.  Like your resume, this is information that will evolve over time and should be continually updated.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

Artifacts

[Artifacts are the items you consider to be representative of your academic interests and achievements. For each entry, include both an artifact and a detailed annotation.  An annotation includes both a description of the artifact and a reflection on why it is important to you, what you learned, and what it means for your next steps.  For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]

About Me

[Your “About Me” is a brief biographical statement that might include your intended major, your academic interests, your goals, as well as the things that make you unique.  Definitely include a picture! Also, remember that you can always update this post at any point. For more guidance on using your ePortfolio, including questions and prompts that will help you get started, please visit the Honors & Scholars ePortfolio course in Carmen. To get answers to specific questions, please email eportfolio@osu.edu. Delete these instructions and add your own post.]