No Pigweed Left Behind

By: Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension Weed Specialist, previously published in the C.O.R.N. newsletter

If you don’t already have to deal with waterhemp or Palmer amaranth, you don’t want it. Ask anyone who does. Neither one of these weeds is easy to manage, and both can cause substantial increases in the cost of herbicide programs, which have to be constantly changed to account for the multiple resistance that will develop over time (not “can,” “will”). Continue reading

ODA Proposes Changes to Ohio’s Noxious Weeds List

By Peggy Hall, Asst. Professor, Agricultural & Resource Law, Ohio State University

Wild carrot, Oxeye daisy, and wild mustard will no longer be prohibited noxious weeds in Ohio if the Ohio Department of Agriculture’s (ODA) revisions to the noxious weeds list become effective. ODA is proposing to remove the three plants after its five-year review of plant species considered “noxious” for purposes of Ohio law. The agency is also proposing adding these 12 species to the noxious weeds list: Continue reading

Weed Observation and Management in Ohio

By Harold Watters, Ohio State University Extension

I hear the neighbor’s combine running and the semi rolling past the house so it’s a good night to harvest late. Hopefully as everyone harvested their soybeans they were observing what weeds are out there. We did have an open canopy for an extended period into the year due to the cool, wet growing conditions. This often leads to an increased number of weeds. Our county educators have been observing soybean fields across the state this fall to see what is out there for our annual fall soybean weed survey. Continue reading

New Dicamba Rules

By Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter

ROCKVILLE, Md. (DTN) — Growers will have access to dicamba to spray on dicamba-tolerant crops in 2018, but the herbicides will come with new label restrictions and will be categorized as restricted use pesticides.

EPA announced Friday that the dicamba “registrants voluntarily agreed to registration and labeling changes including making these products restricted-use, record keeping requirements, and certain additional spray drift mitigation measures.” Continue reading

Dodder in Western Ohio

By Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension herbicide specialist

We have had reports of dodder in some red clover fields. Dodder is a parasitic plant without any leaves or chlorophyll to produce its own energy. It lives by attaching to a host with small appendages (called ‘haustoria”), and extracting the host plant’s carbohydrates. The stems are yellow-orange, stringlike, twining, smooth and branching to form dense masses in infested fields. Although neither toxic nor unpalatable to some livestock, dodder can weaken host plants enough to reduce yield, quality, and stand. If infestations are severe enough, dodder may kill host plants. Continue reading