Drought and Heat Stress

By: Peter Thomison, OSU Extension

One of the corn production scenarios agronomists least like is an exceptionally wet spring followed by a hotter and drier than normal July and August. The spring of 2019 was one the wettest on records throughout much of the state and now, as the dry weather that started in July persists, such a scenario seems to be a possibility in many Ohio corn fields. A combination of warm temperatures and inadequate rainfall is beginning to stress corn fields across Ohio. Continue reading

Average Fall Freeze Dates for Corn Considerations

By: Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension Climate Specialist and Sam Custer, OSU Extension Darke County

In last week’s C.O.R.N. newsletter, Peter Thomison provided useful information on tools available for switching corn hybrids (https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2019-15/more-switching-corn-hybrid-maturities). As Dr. Thomison points out, Dr. Bob Nielsen at Purdue University wrote an article describing the U2U Corn GDD Tool, available from the Midwest Regional Climate Center (https://mrcc.illinois.edu/U2U/gdd/), with caveats to keep in mind as one is making their decisions. Specifically, users are encouraged to modify their black layer GDDs within the tool in order to reflect a more accurate assessment of days to maturity.

Continue reading

Wetter Pattern than Normal will Continue into March…and Possibly April

By: Jim Noel, National Weather Service
Previously published in OSU Extension C.O.R.N. Newsletter

Not a lot of great news in the short-term. The wet pattern so far this year is likely to persist into March as an active weather pattern from the Pacific Ocean moves across the U.S.

In addition, the temperature gradient is amplified more than normal this late winter into early spring meaning colder north and warmer south. This will help fuel the storms and keep things active.

The outlook for March calls for temperatures near or slightly below normal with precipitation above normal.  Continue reading

Climate Change Gets Local

By Emily Unglesbee
DTN Staff Reporter, Previously published by DTN

LONDON, Ohio (DTN) — At 6 feet, 8 inches tall, with a bushy, orange beard, Aaron Wilson towers very visibly above the crowds at Ohio State University’s Farm Science Review.

But it’s what he’s talking about that really makes him stand out at the annual farm trade show.

In addition to OSU Extension, Wilson works at the Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center, studying the effects of climate change, an often controversial and misunderstood topic in agriculture. Continue reading

Ponding and Corn

By Peter Thomison and Alexander Lindsey, Ohio State University Extension

Persistent rains during the past two weeks have resulted in ponding and saturated soils in many Ohio corn fields and led to questions concerning what impact these conditions will have on corn performance.

The extent to which ponding injures corn is determined by several factors including: (1) plant stage of development when ponding occurs, (2) duration of ponding and (3) air/soil temperatures. Continue reading

Hybrid Switching Decisions

By: Dave Huff, NuTech Seed Agronomist, Eastern Product Specialist
Previously on Ohio Ag Net

With a late start for some and corn fields not yet planted throughout the region, growers are asking, “Do I need to be switching to earlier maturing corn varieties?” and “Should I replant problem fields?”

It seems like each year I need to address these questions. We learned in the past that corn requires fewer Growing Degree Units (GDUs) to mature when planted after May 1 than listed in product brochures. From my own research trials and University trial data, we can expect corn planted in our region to require on average around 6.8 fewer GDUs to mature for every day of delay beyond May 1. Another way to interpret this is that it would require approximately 200 fewer GDUs from May 1 planting versus June 1 planting to reach black layer. Continue reading

I-80 Planting Tour: Ohio (Henry County)

By: Betsy Jibben, AgDay Reporter

Cold temperatures and snow are keeping farmers out of the field in northwest Ohio. Some farmers have reported both rain and snow over the weekend.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released its weekly crop progress report showing no corn is planted in the state, which is a common threat across Interstate 80.

AgDay national reporter Betsy Jibben talks with Eric Klein, a farmer from Malinta, Ohio; Nate Like, a farmer from Hamler, Ohio; and Rex Williamson, an agent with Williamson Insurance Agency in Payne, Ohio.

Changing climate highlighted at Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference

By: Matt Reese, Ohio Ag Net

Increased rainfall in larger doses and warming temperatures in the future are likely, building on trends that have already been seen in Ohio.

The first day of the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference included many presentations including nutrient management, crop production, water quality, technology and innovation during the event at Ohio Northern University in Ada. The role of the changing climate cannot be ignored in agriculture’s ongoing challenges with nutrient management and water quality. Continue reading

Increased Rainfall for Ohio Has Ag Implications

Previously Published on Ohio Ag Net

Ohio receives 10% more rain per year, on average, than in the 20th century.

“You can think of it as the ‘new normal,’ ” said Aaron Wilson, climate specialist for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University.

Ohio’s current annual average is 42 inches, up 3 inches from the 39-inch average in the 20th century, Wilson said. Three inches may sound like just a drop in the, well, bucket, but “the problem is the intensity at which the rain is falling,” Wilson said. Continue reading

Climate Scientists Study the Odds of a U.S. Megadrought

By: Cornell University

To help untangle fact from speculation, Cornell climate scientists and their colleagues have developed a “robust null hypothesis” to assess the odds of a megadrought – one that lasts more than 30 years – occurring in the western and southwestern United States. The research was published online in the Journal of Climate. Continue reading