Cover Crop Termination

By: Alyssa Essman and Mark Loux, Ohio State University Extension, Weed Science Specialist

The 2019 growing season came and went and left many fields in a state of disarray heading into 2020. Many growers that were unable to plant decided to use cover crops, to reduce soil erosion and provide some weed suppression during the extended fallow period. Terminating these cover crops using the right methods at the right time will be critical to ensure timely planting and prevent the cover crops from competing with cash crops. The three main methods of cover crop termination are natural (species that winter kill), chemical, and mechanical. Continue reading

The Season for Slugs

By: Kelley Tilmon and Andy Michel, OSU Extension agronomy entomologists

Late planting in many areas, the small size of both soybean and corn plants, and damp, cool conditions in some areas all lead to a greater damage potential from slugs.  Although all fields should be scouted for slugs, focus on no-till fields or those fields with cover crops, a history of slug problems, poor weed control, or a lot of residue left on the field.  We don’t have good economic thresholds for slugs in corn or soybean, yet the following guidelines are to helpful in scouting for their presence and intensity. Continue reading

Understand Carbon to Nitrogen Ratios before Buying Cover Crop Seed

By: Sonja Begemann, Farm Journal Seeds and Crop Production Editor
Previously published on AgWeb Daily

By now you’ve heard of the “carbon penalty” some producers face with residue and cover crops—but what does that really mean? And should it deter you from planting cover crops?

Experts say it doesn’t mean you shouldn’t use cover crops—just know what you’re planting and its effect on soil. Nitrogen release—or tie up—is affected by many factors, according to Julia Gaskin, sustainable agriculture coordinator for the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at the University of Georgia. Continue reading