What to do about Nitrogen Fertilizer in Corn?

By: Steve Culman, Peter Thomison, Alexander Lindsey, Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA, Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA, Laura Lindsey

The persistent rain this year may force many growers to sidedress their nitrogen in corn much later than what is considered normal. Other growers may be supplementing their earlier N applications to replace N lost from denitrification and leaching. The following are some suggestions based on common questions we’ve been hearing.

Do I need additional N?

Nitrogen is one the most dynamic crop nutrients in the soil and has many pathways for loss. It’s leaky nature plus the fact that crops need it in such large quantities makes the task of knowing exactly how much N to apply very challenging. The excessive water this spring has clearly driven losses in many fields, but how much? Recent research at Ohio State has shown that ear leaf N, soil nitrate and grain yields were significantly reduced after just 2 days of standing water in the field. So N losses can occur quickly with excessive water. Continue reading

Event Notice – Managing Prevented Planting Acres

Join us in one of two locations for an informational meeting on how to manage prevented planting acres. Topics will include weed control, options for annual forages, how to manage treated soybean seed, and a Q&A session with listed speakers and representatives from the cover crop and crop insurance industries.

2019 Prevented Planting Meeting Flyer

2019 Challenge: Forage Production Options for Ohio

By: Mark SulcBill WeissDianne ShoemakerSarah Noggle. OSU Extension

Across Ohio, farmers are facing challenges unimagined just four months ago.  Widespread loss of established alfalfa stands coupled with delayed or impossible planting conditions for other crops leave many farmers, their agronomists and nutritionists wondering what crops can produce reasonable amounts of quality forage yet this year. In addition, frequent and heavy rains are preventing harvest of forages that did survive the winter and are causing further deterioration of those stands.

With July 1st just around the corner, Mark Sulc, OSU Extension Forage Agronomist and Bill Weiss, OSU Extension Dairy Nutritionist, help address this forage dilemma.  If one is looking for quality and quantity, what are your best options? The article starts with a quick summary of options and then dig into some of the pros and cons of these options (listed in no particular order of preference). Continue reading

Forage Shortage and Prevented Planting Acres… think OATS!

By: Al Gahler and Stan Smith, OSU Extension

Last week, USDA released the declaration that a cover crop planted onto prevented planting acres can now be harvested as a forage after September 1st, rather than the normal date of November 1st, which provides a small glimmer of hope for some livestock producers and those equipped to harvest forages.  While Ohio is also experiencing a severe shortage of forages for all classes of livestock, weed control on prevented planting acres is a major concern, and with USDA’s declaration, we can now address both problems in one action – seeding cover crops that will be harvestable as a forage after September 1st. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Don’t Know What We Don’t Know

This spring has really been a moving target with many pieces of the farming puzzle not wanting to fit together in a timely manner. The last couple of days have been as good as any to get into the fields, at least those that are fairly well drained. There have been many discussions among the agricultural community about some of these moving parts; prevented plant, disaster relief, trade aid/Market Facilitation Payment, and switching acres to soybeans. As of today here’s some of what we do know: Continue reading

Prevent Plant Decisions in Early to Middle of June

By: Gary Schnitkey, Krista Swanson, Jonathan Coppess, and Ryan Batts, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois and Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics, Ohio State University

Many unplanted acres remain across the Corn Belt and in Illinois. As of the week ending on June 9, only 73% of the intended corn acres and 49% of the soybean acres have been planted in Illinois (Planting Progress, June 10, 2019). In this article, prevent planting decisions on intended corn acres are examined first. For farmers that have not incurred costs, prices must rise before planting corn in mid-June will return more than taking prevent planting payments, for those with that insurance option. In most circumstances, a corn prevent planting payment will have higher returns than planting soybeans. Continue reading

Average Fall Freeze Dates for Corn Considerations

By: Aaron Wilson, OSU Extension Climate Specialist and Sam Custer, OSU Extension Darke County

In last week’s C.O.R.N. newsletter, Peter Thomison provided useful information on tools available for switching corn hybrids (https://agcrops.osu.edu/newsletter/corn-newsletter/2019-15/more-switching-corn-hybrid-maturities). As Dr. Thomison points out, Dr. Bob Nielsen at Purdue University wrote an article describing the U2U Corn GDD Tool, available from the Midwest Regional Climate Center (https://mrcc.illinois.edu/U2U/gdd/), with caveats to keep in mind as one is making their decisions. Specifically, users are encouraged to modify their black layer GDDs within the tool in order to reflect a more accurate assessment of days to maturity.

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Prevented Planting, 2019 Market Facilitation Program Payments, Disaster Assistance, and Price Dynamics

By: Gary SchnitkeyKrista SwansonRyan Batts and Jonathan Coppess with the University of Illinois Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics University of Illinois and Carl Zulauf, with the Ohio State University Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics

We stand at a point of extreme price and policy uncertainty. In the Midwest, corn planting is historically late and many acres are or soon will be eligible for prevented planting payments on corn crop insurance policies. On many farms, corn prices have not increased enough to cause net returns from planting corn to exceed net returns from prevented planting. However, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced a 2019 Market Facilitation Program (MFP) and has currently indicated that payments will be tied to 2019 planted acres. The 2019 MFP could provide incentives to plant crops and not take prevented plantingpayments. Moreover, this program could bring a little used option into play this year: take 35% of the corn prevented planting payment and plant soybeans after the late planting period for corn. Adding confusion to this situation is a disaster assistance program that, has passed Congress and recently signed by President Donald Trump. Continue reading

From Across the Field – Should I Plant?

Hopefully, everyone had a great Memorial Day weekend and got through the severe weather alright. We were fortunate to avoid the worst of it, which was primarily south of US 30. As I enjoyed the three-day weekend with my family it was evident that there is quite a bit of variation in planting progress across the state. South and east of Columbus, I estimate that 70% of corn and 25% of the soybeans are in the ground. That is certainly not the case here in the Maumee Valley.

In most years the question “Should I plant?” is often in the back of many farmer’s minds as raising a crop is what they do best; it’s how they make a living. With the calendar changing to June this weekend with minimal progress made in west and northwest Ohio, that question is more real now than ever. Continue reading

2019 C.O.R.N. Articles Addressing Delayed Planting

By: Alan Geyer, Research Associate, OSU Horticulture and Crop Science

Below is a list of 2019 Ohio State University Extension C.O.R.N. newsletter articles addressing the topic of delayed planting.  This is a summary of articles published this season through the May 28 issue:

Corn Related Articles

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