Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Feeding Cost of Gain for Cattle

By: Michael Langemeier, Center for Commercial Agriculture Purdue University. farmdoc daily (9):124

Corn price futures for the December 2019 contract increased from $3.79 per bushel for the week ending May 10 to $4.55 for the week ending June 28.  Even though corn futures prices weakened after the release of the June crop acreage report, using the iFarm Price Distribution Tool (here) there was still a 13 percent chance on July 1 that corn futures prices will be above $5.00 per bushel.  Moreover, due to continued questions related to U.S. corn acreage in 2019, there is tremendous uncertainty regarding corn prices during the rest of the year.  To address this uncertainty, this article examines the impact of potentially higher corn prices on feeding cost of gain for cattle finishing. Continue reading

“Increase the Feed, or Reduce the Need”

By: Stan Smith, PA, Fairfield County OSU Extension (published originally in The Ohio Farmer on-line)

Seldom have we ever been challenged by wet weather, mud and adverse conditions for such an extended period of time!

Seldom do we talk about forage shortages and above normal precipitation in the same breath. Regardless, that’s where we are now throughout Ohio and much of the Midwest. Over the past year abundant rainfall has allowed us to grow lots of forage. Unfortunately, it seems the weather has seldom allowed us to harvest it as high quality feed. Continue reading

Will Pork Producers Have a Profitable Year?

By: Chris Hurt, Department of Agricultural Economics Purdue University. farmdoc daily (9):125

The pork outlook started this year on a downbeat, then in March and April markets recognized that African swine fever in China could cause global pork shortages and lean futures and industry optimism sailed upward. Summer lean futures exceeded $100, but cash prices could only reach the low $80s and futures came tumbling down. Then in June, hog numbers surprisingly surged nearly nine percent.

So, we are left with three key questions to sort out. First, what will happen to pork supplies in coming weeks and months? For that we will review the latest Hogs and Pigsreport. Secondly, will U.S. pork exports grow by enough to support stronger prices? Third, how will feed costs impact profits? Continue reading

From Across the Field – Managing Prevented Plant Acres

Summer officially began last week and for the first time in seemingly forever we had consecutive days with no rain. In all reality we have had the best week of weather for farm work of the year, too bad it wasn’t in mid May. In the past couple of days, I have seen some dust behind a few bean drills, in addition to tillage and herbicide application across the county. I also suspect that some hay was able to get made, which is a welcome sight to livestock producers. Continue reading

New Disaster Funding from Ohio NRCS To Plant Cover Crops on Damaged Acreage

Source: NRCS

Extreme weather conditions like the recent excessive rains and tornadoes have negatively impacted Ohio farmers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service will invest $4 million to help Ohio agricultural producers recover.  Technical and financial assistance is now available to producers who were unable to plant their crops, or who have experienced crop loss due to flooded or wet fields. This sign-up is an opportunity for farmers to plant a cover crop. Continue reading

Oats Could Address Forage Shortage On Prevented Planting Acres

By: Allen Gahler and Stan Smith, Ohio State University Extension

Last week, USDA released the declaration that a cover crop planted onto prevented planting acres can now be harvested as a forage after Sept. 1, rather than the normal date of Nov. 1, which provides a small glimmer of hope for some livestock producers and those equipped to harvest forages. While Ohio is experiencing a severe shortage of forages for all classes of livestock, weed control on prevented planting acres is also a major concern. With USDA’s declaration, we can now address both problems in one action — seeding cover crops that will be harvestable as a forage after Sept. 1. Continue reading

Hay Inventory Severely Low Across Midwest

Source: OSU Extension

Excessive rainfall has not only hindered soybean and corn farmers’ attempts to plant, but has contributed to a near record-low level of hay to feed livestock in Ohio and across the Midwest.

The hay inventory in Ohio has dipped to the fourth lowest level in the 70 years of reporting inventory, leaving farmers struggling to find ways to keep their animals well fed, said Stan Smith, a program assistant in agriculture and natural resources for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The situation is not much different across the Midwest, where some livestock owners are having to pay much higher prices for animal feed. Continue reading

What to do about Nitrogen Fertilizer in Corn?

By: Steve Culman, Peter Thomison, Alexander Lindsey, Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA, Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA, Laura Lindsey

The persistent rain this year may force many growers to sidedress their nitrogen in corn much later than what is considered normal. Other growers may be supplementing their earlier N applications to replace N lost from denitrification and leaching. The following are some suggestions based on common questions we’ve been hearing.

Do I need additional N?

Nitrogen is one the most dynamic crop nutrients in the soil and has many pathways for loss. It’s leaky nature plus the fact that crops need it in such large quantities makes the task of knowing exactly how much N to apply very challenging. The excessive water this spring has clearly driven losses in many fields, but how much? Recent research at Ohio State has shown that ear leaf N, soil nitrate and grain yields were significantly reduced after just 2 days of standing water in the field. So N losses can occur quickly with excessive water. Continue reading