Keeping Tomatoes Healthy in Wet Weather

We are in the middle of a period of wet weather that is predicted to deliver multiple inches of rain to central Ohio and even more to other soaked parts of our state.  Tomatoes are a crop that can suffer several problems related to heavy rainfall that can shorten the harvest period and affect yield.  There are a few things that the backyard grower, community gardener and urban farmer can do to keep their tomato plants healthy and productive though heavy rain periods.

Key Garden Tasks to Keep Tomatoes Healthy in Wet Weather

  • Mulch – organic or non-organic can both be used.  Be careful if your plasticulture is not permeable to air and water,  the heavy constant rainfall may saturate the soil and drown the roots if the soil cannot dry out. Mulch also acts as a barrier to keep soil borne fungal spores off lower tomato leaves.
  • Fertility – contstant rainfall can leach fertility from soil making it unavailable to the plants. Make sure to monitor plant growth and health carefully to avoid a nutrient deficiency.  Foliar feeding can be used when the ground is too saturated to irrigate with water soluble fertilizer.
  • Pruning – promote air circulation by pruning lower leaves.  Try to minimize lower leaf contact with soil.  Use sterilized pruners to remove any diseased leaves and make sure to put diseased leaves in the garbage and not the compost after pruning.

 

This plant needs mulched around the base to prevent soil borne fungal spore contact with leaves. Pruning of the lower leaves will also promote air circulation to assist in disease prevention.

 

These discolored leaves suggest fungal disease in this tomato plant. The leaves need pruned with sterilized pruners and then discarded into the garbage and not the compost pile.

 

This tomato has both organic and plasticulture mulch at the base to keep fungal spores in the soil and off plant leaves. Pruning needs to be done to allow air circulation at the base of the plant.

 

This tomato plant has had lower leaves removed for air circulation with a combination of compost and plasticulture mulch at the base of the plant.

 

Monitor tomatoes carefully for signs of blight, remove the diseased leaves promptly with sterilized pruners and dispose of disease materials in the garbage, not the compost pile.

Make sure to address fertility needs as production increases.  Heavy rain can leach nutrients into the subsoil where they are unavailable to plants, decreasing yield as the season progresses.

Feel free to email mcdermott.15@osu.edu pictures of tomato problems to assist in diagnosis.

Ohio State University Extension has an excellent fact sheet on Growing Tomatoes in the Home Garden.   There is also a plant disease diagnostic laboratory on campus where the grower can send samples if an accurate diagnosis needs confirmed on possible diseased leaves.

Focus on Weed Control – Pennsylvania Smartweed

A weed that I have gotten many questions and emailed pictures about this spring is Pennsylvania Smartweed.  This is an annual weed common to central Ohio that is in the same family as Buckwheat.  It can produce upwards of 20,000 seeds per plant that can persist in the soil for several years so control of this weed before seed set is critical for the backyard grower, community gardener and urban farmer.

One use of note for this weed is as a trap crop.  Japanese Beetles prefer this as a forage to the rest of my desired plantings and will feed on this first before going to my vegetables, fruits and herbs.  To make effective use of this weed as a trap crop, make sure to kill the beetles regularly or you have provided them with food and shelter instead.

The flower of Pennsylvania Smartweed including a couple of breeding pollinators.  Make sure to mow, herbicide, or use tillage to kill this weed before seed set to prevent large amounts of weed seed from entering your seed bank.

Source fact sheet for background information – Credit: Michigan State University Extension. 

 

Small Farm Conference and Trade Show in Piketon on March 29th and 30th

Come visit the Small Farm Conference and Trade Show at OSU South Centers in Piketon on March 29th and 30th.  A wide variety of educational tracks will be offered.   See the class listings below.  This is a great opportunity for the urban farmer or producer to learn about a number of topics related to production.

Click the image below to enlarge.

 

CLICK HERE for registration details, event brochure and details of class listing. 

 

 

 

2019 South Side Spring Gardening Workshops

While these classes are to support the South Side community of The Buckeye ISA, they are free and open to the public so bring your friends and your questions.  Families with children that want to grow their own food may be eligible to enroll in the Buckeye ISA and get materials and educational support.

Click HERE to print the flyer –> 2019 Spring Gardening SS ISA