Upcoming Lecture: Isis Nusair on Narratives of Syrian Migration in Germany

Date: Friday, October 20, 2017
Lecture: 12:00-1:30pm
Roundtable Discussion: 1:30-2:30pm
Where: 160 Enarson

The Middle East Studies Center will host Professor Isis Nusair (Denison University), who will lecture on her field research in Germany on how Syrian immigrants navigate the dominant narratives about their community.  She will take a close look at gendered narratives, and how women especially respond to these.

For more information, please go to MESC Events Calendar.

Following the lecture, there will be a roundtable discussion with graduate students.

 

“Zionist Vipers and Jewish Pseudo-Nationalists:” Anti-Zionism, Liberalism, and Slavophobia in Interwar Greece

Paris Papamichos Chronakis
University of Illinois at Chicago

Tuesday, October 3, 2017
214 Denney Hall
3:30-5:00 pm

Please note this event co-sponsored by the Global Mobility Project, together with the Departments of History, Classics, and History of Art.

Regulating Flows of People Across Eurasia


Regulating Flows of People Across Eurasia: Migration Policy in the Russian Federation

Regulating Flows of People Across Eurasia: Migration Policy in the Russian Federation

A Talk by Professor Sergei Abashin
European University at St. Petersburg
Tuesday, March 28, 3:00 – 4:30pm
Enarson Classroom Building 100

Join the Center for Slavic and East European Studies for a bilingual discussion about current migration policy within the Russian Federation. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has seen 25 years of migration flows as populations have adjusted to new state boundaries in the region, the aftermath of forced resettlement of populations during the Soviet Union, and the economic migration of populations from neighboring countries to work in Russia. With increased attention on migrants and immigration in countries across the world, this talk will focus on the flows of people within the Russian Federation, their causes and effects, and government and policy responses. Sergei Abashin, a professor of anthropology at the European University at St. Petersburg, is a specialist in migration studies and Central Asian nationality building who has done extensive field work in Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. The talk will be delivered in Russian, with simultaneous English translation. Students of Russian, as well as faculty and the general public who are interested in the topic but do not know Russian are encouraged to attend.

Watch a recording of the Facebook Livestream below.

 

Regulating Flows of People Across Eurasia: Migration Policy in the Russian Federation
A Talk by Professor Sergei Abashin, translated live by Natalia Zotova
European University at St. Petersburg
Tuesday, March 28, 3:00 – 4:30pm
Enarson Classroom Building 100

Posted by The Global Mobility Project at Ohio State on Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Click the image to view the flyer for the event

Kate Vieira: Writing for Love and Money: How Migration Promotes Literacy Learning in Transnational Families


Please join Literacy Studies, co-sponsored by Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy and Latino/a Studies in observance of Cesar Chavez Day, this Thursday for this lecture engaging ideas of migration and literacy learning. 
 
Thursday, March 30, 2017 – 4:00 p.m.
311 Denney Hall, 164 Annie & John Glenn Avenue
 
According to the UN, 244 million people currently live outside the countries of their birth. As more people worldwide migrate to find work, policy makers have expressed concerns about the effects on family dynamics and an international “brain drain.” Vieira’s ethnographic research reveals migration’s unexpected relationship to literacy learning as transnational families write to stay economically and intimately connected.
Kate Vieira teaches Composition and Rhetoric at University of Wisconsin, Madison and is author of ‘American By Paper’: How Documents Matter in Immigrant Migration (2016).
Contact Michael Harwick (harwick.1@osu.edu) or Nora McCook (mccook.3@osu.edu) with any questions. 

No Dancing in the Streets

This lecture by Global Mobility Project affiliate member Danielle V. Schoon might be of interest for those who are interested in dance, performance, migration, or the Romani.

Description of the lecture:

This talk presents research that examines Romani (“Gypsy”) identity in Turkey in light of conflicting claims to belonging in the city, the nation, the European Union, and the “global village.” While Turkey’s Roma are being actively integrated into minority politics, they are also facing the dissolution of their communities, traditional occupations, and cultural life as privatization and land reforms dislocate the urban poor to state housing units in the name of improvement and ‘renewal.’ At the same time, international rights organizations are supporting counter-hegemonic state narratives via minority and human rights discourses that both enable and limit the boundaries of Romani identity. The talk will compare three cases that locate the intersection of urban space, state-led reforms, and Romani belonging in dance practice: 1) competing Hidrellez events that strategically place dance on the street or on the stage; 2) dance classes for dislocated Romani children that codify and stage social dance as a folk dance; and 3) Romani performers who travel the global belly dance circuit.

Upcoming talk about Migration Policy in the Russian Federation

This talk may be of interest to those who study migration and mobility.

Regulating Flows of People Across Eurasia: Migration Policy in the Russian Federation

A Talk by Professor Sergei Abashin
European University at St. Petersburg
Tuesday, March 28, 3:00 – 4:30pm
Enarson Classroom Building 100

Join the Center for Slavic and East European Studies for a bilingual discussion about current migration policy within the Russian Federation. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia has seen 25 years of migration flows as populations have adjusted to new state boundaries in the region, the aftermath of forced resettlement of populations during the Soviet Union, and the economic migration of populations from neighboring countries to work in Russia. With increased attention on migrants and immigration in countries across the world, this talk will focus on the flows of people within the Russian Federation, their causes and effects, and government and policy responses. Sergei Abashin, a professor of anthropology at the European University at St. Petersburg, is a specialist in migration studies and Central Asian nationality building who has done extensive field work in Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan. The talk will be delivered in Russian, with simultaneous English translation. Students of Russian, as well as faculty and the general public who are interested in the topic but do not know Russian are encouraged to attend.

Click the image to view the flyer for the event

CFS Lecture: Listening for Religion in Central Ohio

This talk by affiliate member Isaac Weiner might be of interest.

Isaac Weiner Talk:

Listening for Religion in Central Ohio

Monday, January 30  4:00pm to 5:30pm
18th Ave. Library, 175 W. 18th, Room 205

What does religion in central Ohio sound like? Where does one go to hear it? How might we understand religious diversity differently if we begin by listening for it? These questions animate the American Religious Sounds Project (ARSP), a collaborative research initiative of Ohio State and Michigan State Universities, which will offer new resources for documenting and interpreting the diversity of American religious life by attending to its varied sonic cultures. In this talk, Professor Weiner will introduce the ARSP and reflect on some of its opportunities and challenges.