Research Methodology Workshop

Date: Tuesday, November 14, 1:00-2:30
Location: Enarson, Room 160

On Tuesday, November 14, 1:00-2:30 we will be hosting a discussion on Research Methodology.  The workshop will feature presentations from our faculty affiliates and team members.

Join the GMP affiliated faculty, Robin Judd (History), Hannah Kosstrin (Dance), Yana Hashamova (Slavic), Arati Maleku (Social Work), and Ryan Skinner (Music), as they discuss research methodologies related to questions of global mobility and migration.

Upcoming Events: The Work and Words of Filmmaker Dani Kouyaté at OSU

Ethnomusicology

The following events, made possible by a Global Mobility faculty research grant awarded to Associate Professor of Musicology Ryan Skinner, will be taking place over the next two weeks:

1. Monday, September 18, 2017 – 4:00pm to 5:30pm, 18th Ave. Library, Room 205:  A screening of filmmaker Dani Kouyate’s first (and award-winning) feature film, Keita: The Heritage of the Griothttps://music.osu.edu/events/musicology-lecture-dani-kouyate-film

Trailer for Keita: The Heritage of the Griot
Film
2. Monday, September 25, 2017 – 4:00pm to 5:30pm, 18th Ave. Library, Room 205: Conversation with filmmaker Dani Kouyaté and Professor Ryan Skinner On the role and significance of music and sound in the cinematic oeuvre of Dani Kouyaté.  Co-sponsored by The Ohio State University Libraries:
Discussion
3. Tuesday, September 26, 2017 – 7:00pm to 9:00pm, Wexner Center for the Arts: A screening of Kouyaté’s most recent (and award winning) film, While We Live, followed by a Q&A with the filmmaker.  Co-sponsored by the School of Music, African American and African Studies, French and Italian, Germanic Languages and Literatures, the Global Mobility Project, the Office of International Affairs, Ethnomusicology Program. https://music.osu.edu/events/musicology-lecture-kouyate-while-we-live

While We Live (Medan Vi Lever) – International trailer from DFM_FEATURES on Vimeo.

 

 

LOC: Telling the story of America through Songs of Immigration and Migration

The Library of Congress has a great article telling the story of America through songs of immigration and migration.

“As Europeans colonized North America, beginning with the Spanish and French in the 1500s and the British and Dutch in the early 1600s, colonists brought their cultural entertainments along with them. Songs brought to colonial America continued to be sung in their early forms, so that later scholars of songs and ballads, such as the British ethnomusicologist Cecil Sharp and American ballad scholar Francis James Child, looked to North America to find early versions of songs, and songs no longer sung in their country of origin.[1] Ethnomusicologist Juan Rael documented folk dramas and passion plays — sung performances — that preserved early versions of Spanish religious songs in what had been the relatively isolated colony of New Mexico (modern New Mexico and western Colorado). With the development of sound recording, scholars attempted to record the earliest versions of songs that they could find, such as the ballads Child had identified. An example of a rare pre-industrial work song in this presentation is a Scottish song that women used when fulling cloth, called a “waulking” song. See “Fhillie duhinn s’tu ga m’dhi,” sung by Mary MacPhee in 1939.”

Read more:

https://www.loc.gov/collections/songs-of-america/articles-and-essays/historical-topics/songs-of-immigration-and-migration/

Article: “Correlations in the population structure of music, genes and language”

In a 2014 article, Steven Brown and colleagues demonstrate that music and genes may have coevolved by analyzing correlations between traditional folk songs and mitochondrial DNA among indigenous populations in Taiwan.  “These correlations were of comparable magnitude to those between language and genes for the same populations, although music and language were not significantly correlated with one another. […]  Music may therefore have the potential to serve as a novel marker of human migrations to complement genes, language and other markers” (Brown, et al 2014).

Read the full article from the Proceedings of the Royal Society B here: http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1774/20132072.short