Articles and Chapters

Articles


Hmielowski, J.D. & Nisbet, E. (in press). “Maybe yes, maybe no?”: Testing the indirect relationship of news use through ambivalence and strength of policy position on public engagement with climate change. Mass Communication & Society. doi:10.1080/15205436.2016.1183029

Summary: Forthcoming

Stoycheff, E. & Nisbet, E.C. (in press). Priming the Costs of Conflict? Russian Public Opinion about the 2014 Crimean Conflict. International Journal of Public Opinion Research

Summary: Forthcoming

Behrouzian, G., Nisbet, E.C., Dal, A., & Carkoglu, A. (in press) Seeking Online Political Information in Closed Media Environments: Explicating Citizens’ Motivated Resistance to Censorship. International Journal of Communication

Summary: Forthcoming

Stoycheff, E., Nisbet, E.C., & Epstein, D. (in press). Differential effects of capital-enhancing and recreational Internet use on citizens’ demand for democracy. Communication Research. doi: 10.1177/0093650216644645

Summary: Forthcoming

Stoycheff, E. (in press). Under surveillance: Examining Facebook’s spiral of silence effects in the wake of NSA Internet monitoring. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly. doi: 10.1177/1077699016630255

Summary: Forthcoming

Hart, P.S., Nisbet, E.C., & Myers, T (2015). Public Attention to Science and Political News and Support for Climate Change Mitigation. Nature Climate Change, 5, 541-545

Summary: Forthcoming

Nisbet, E.C., Cooper, K., & Ellithorpe, M. (2015). Ignorance or bias? Evaluating the ideological and informational drivers of communication gaps about climate change. Public Understanding of Science. 24(3), 285-301

Summary: Forthcoming

Nisbet, E.C., Cooper, K., & Garrett, R.K. (2015). The Partisan Brain: How Dissonant Science Messages Lead Conservatives and Liberals to (Dis)trust science. Annals of the Academy of Political Science. 658 (1), 36-66

Summary: Forthcoming

Stoycheff, E. & Nisbet, E.C. (2014). What’s the bandwidth for democracy? Deconstructing Internet penetration and citizen attitudes about governance. Political Communication, 31(4), 628-646 doi:10.1080/10584609.2013.852641

Summary: Forthcoming

Nisbet, E.C. & Stoycheff, E. (2013). Let the people speak: a multi-level model of supply and demand for press freedom. Communication Research. 40(5), 720-741 doi: 10.1177/0093650211429117

Summary: Forthcoming

Nisbet, E.C., Hart, P.S., Myers, T., & Ellithorpe, M. (2013). Attitude change in competitive framing environments? Open/close-mindedness and framing effects about climate change. Journal of Communication. 63(4), 766-785 doi: 10.1111/jcom.12040

Summary: Forthcoming

Garret, R.K., Nisbet, E.C., Lynch, E. (2013) Undermining the corrective effects of media-based political fact checking? The role of contextual cues and naïve theory. Journal of Communication. 63(4), 617-637 doi: 10.1111/jcom.12038

Summary: Forthcoming

Hart, P.S. & Nisbet, E.C. (2012). Boomerang effects in science communication: How motivated reasoning and identity cues amplify opinion polarization about climate mitigation policies. Communication Research, 39(6), 701-723 doi: 10.1177/0093650211416646

Summary: Forthcoming

Nisbet, E.C., Stoycheff, E., & Pearce, K. E., (2012). Internet use and democratic demands: A multi-national, multi-level model of internet use and citizen attitudes about democracy. Journal of Communication. 62(1), 249-262 doi: 10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01627.x

Summary: Forthcoming

Fahmy, S., Wanta, W., & Nisbet, E.C. (2012). Mediated public diplomacy: satellite TV news in the Arab world and perception effects.International Communication Gazette, 74, 8 728-749.

Summary: Using Entman’s work on mediated public diplomacy, the authors conducted an Arabiclanguage online survey of news consumers on Arab websites, including one US-funded media outlet. They examined factors leading to gaps in exposure and perceptions of credibility for three Arab news outlets. Specifically, they examined variables that differentiated between exposure to and perceived credibility regarding the three satellite news media – al-Jazeera, al-Arabiya, and al-Hurra. Results showed that issue importance and attitudes toward the United States were significant predictors of exposure gaps between the US-funded network and other Arab media. Exposure gaps were also powerful predictors of perceived credibility.

Nisbet, E.C., Stoycheff, E., & Pearce, K. E., (2012). Internet use and democratic demands: A multi-national, multilevel model of internet use and citizen attitudes about democracy. Journal of Communication. 62(2), 249-262.

Summary: The success of a democracy depends, in part, on public demand for democratic institutions. How does Internet use shape citizens’ preferences for regime type? Combining individual public opinion data from Africa and Asia with country-level indices, we test a multilevel model examining the relationship between Internet penetration, individual Internet use, and citizen demand for democracy across 28 countries. We find that Internet use, but not national Internet penetration, is associated with greater citizen commitment to democratic governance. Furthermore, greater democratization and Internet penetration moderates the relationship between Internet use and demand for democracy.

Hart, P.S. & Nisbet, E.C. (2012). Boomerang effects in science communication: How motivated reasoning and identity cues amplify opinion polarization about climate mitigation policies. Communication Research, 39(6), 701-723.

Summary: The deficit-model of science communication assumes increased communication about science issues will move public opinion toward the scientific consensus. However, in the case of climate change, public polarization about the issue has increased in recent years, not diminished. In this study, we draw from theories of motivated reasoning, social identity, and persuasion to examine how science-based messages may increase public polarization on controversial science issues such as climate change. Exposing 240 adults to simulated news stories about possible climate change health impacts on different groups, we found the influence of identification with potential victims was contingent on participants’ political partisanship. This partisanship increased the degree of political polarization on support for climate mitigation policies and resulted in a boomerang effect among Republican participants. Implications for understanding the role of motivated reasoning within the context of science communication are discussed.

Nisbet, E.C. & Myers, T. (2011). Anti-American attitudes as a media effect? Arab media, political identity, and public opinion in the Middle East. Communication Research, 38(5), 684-709.

Summary: Many have attributed anti-American sentiment within Arab countries to a highly negative information environment propagated by transnational Arab satellite TV news channels such as Al-Jazeera. However, theoretical models and empirical evidence evaluating the linkages between media exposure and opinion about the United States remains scant. Drawing on theories of media effects, identity, and public opinion, this article develops a theoretical framework explicating how the influence of transnational Arab TV on opinion formation is contingent on competing political identities within the region. Employing 5 years of survey data collected across six Arab countries, we empirically test several propositions about the relationship between Arab TV exposure and public opinion about the United States generated by our theoretical framework. Our results demonstrate significant associations between transnational Arab TV exposure and anti-American sentiment, but also show these associations vary substantially by channel and political identification. The theoretical and policy implications of the study are discussed.

Epstein, D., Nisbet, E.C., & Gillespie, T. (2011). Who’s responsible for the digital divide? Public perceptions and policy implications. The Information Society. 27(2), 92-104.

Summary: Addressing the reasons for—and the solutions to—the “digital divide” has been on the public agenda since the emergence of the Internet. However, the term has meant quite different things, depending on the audience and the context, and these competing interpretations may in fact orient toward different policy outcomes. The goals of this article are twofold. First, the authors unpack the term “digital divide” and examine how it has been deployed and interpreted across a range of academic and policy discourses. Second, through a framing experiment embedded within a nationally representative survey, the authors demonstrate how presenting respondents with two different conceptual frames of the digital divide may lead to different perceptions of who is most accountable for addressing the issue. From this, they discuss the dynamic relationship between the construction and communication of policy discourse and the public understanding of the digital divide, as well as implications for effective communication about the digital divide and information and communication technology policy to the general public.

Nisbet, E.C. & Meyers, T. (2010) Challenging the state: Transnational TV and political identity in the Middle East. Political Communication, 27(4), 1-20 .

Summary: Several scholars have linked the growth of transnational Arab TV in the Middle East over the past decade to a rise in transnational Muslim and Arab political identification at the expense of national political identity. However, a theoretical context for understanding how media exposure may influence political identification in the Middle East at an individual level of analysis has been lacking, and to date very little quantitative evidence has been presented. Our article addresses this gap by presenting a theoretical framework for linking individual media use to political identity in the Middle East and then employing this framework to quantitatively test the association between transnational Arab TV exposure and individual political identification using a set of cross-national surveys conducted in six Middle Eastern states between 2004 and 2008. We find evidence that exposure to transnational Arab TV increases the probability of transnational Muslim and Arab political identification at the expense of national political identities, though the influence of transnational TV on identity salience varied significantly across levels of education. Theoretical implications for the role of media in political socialization and identity salience, as well as implications for American foreign policy, are discussed.

Nisbet, E.C. (2008). Media use, democratic citizenship, and communicating gaps in a developing democracy. International Journal of Public Opinion Research. 20 (4), 454-482.

Chapters


Dal, A.*, Nisbet, E., & Carkoglu, A. (2016). Patterns of News Media Consumption and Social Media Use in Turkey. In J. Wang’s (ed.) Turkey and Public Diplomacy: A CPD Reader. Los Angeles: USC Center for Public Diplomacy.

Summary: Forthcoming

Nisbet, E.C., Ostman, R., & Shanahan, J. (2008). Public opinion toward Muslim Americans: Civil liberties and the role of religiosity, ideology, and media Use. In A. Sinno’s (ed.), Muslims in Western Politics (pp. 161-199). Bloomington: Indiana University Press

Reports


Nisbet, E.C. (2007). BOOK REVIEW: Negative liberty: Public opinion and the terrorist attacks on America by Darren W. Davis. Public Opinion Quarterly, 71(4), 693-695.

Summary: Forthcoming