Design 2310, Design Visualizations 1

This post contains the course description, assignments, assignment objectives, and examples of the assignments offered in the 2017 and 2018 version of the Design Visualization 1 course offered in the autumn semesters.

Course description

Introduction to perspective, freehand drawing, digital drawing, and basic construction as skills to communicate characteristics of a subject and space as it pertains to Design. Emphasis on observational and ruled drawing as a tool to record, analyze and communicate information about natural and an made objects. This is a progress-oriented course that combines theory and practice into a lecture and studio format. Both will require active student participation. Class meets two days a week for 2.6 hours each day. The course is comprised of lectures, presentations, assignments, participatory activities and individual meetings, reading assignments and critiques. Students are encouraged to utilize classroom and departmental facilities.

 

Course Projects

Assignment 1: Boxes in perspective

Parameters:

Students must create two drawings for this assignment. The first is a multi-step drawing that utilizes vanishing points and a horizon line to generate boxes in two-point perspective with a variety of line weights. The second is a multi-step drawing that requires the students to use observational drawing techniques to capture a small composition involving rectilinear objects.

Rational/Context:

Students have varied backgrounds in art and design when they start our program. Some arrive quite skilled in one or more areas while some have had no formal training. The first three assignments in Design Visualizations introduce them to drawing materials like graphite, pen, and marker and how they might use them. They also experiment with drawing on tracing paper, copy paper, sketchbook paper, and Bristol while be given information about the differences and uses of each. Additionally, they learn to scan and present their work with digital editing software.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize the differences and applications of perspective techniques;
  2. Construct a perspective drawing with straight edges and free hand;
  3.  Conceptualize practical applications of perspective;
  4. Utilize the proper drawing tools to create a variety of lines;
  5. Scan and present your work in a crafted manner.

Examples:

Allison Krish, 2018

 

Calvin Dolatowski, 2018

 

Assignment 2: Ellipses and Cylinders In Perspective

 

Parameters:

Students must create two drawings for this assignment. The first is a multi-step drawing that utilizes vanishing points and a horizon line to generate boxes in two-point perspective with a variety of line weights; students inscribe cylinders inside these boxes. The second is a multi-step drawing that requires the students to use observational drawing techniques to capture a small composition involving cylindrical objects.

Rational/Context:

Students build on their progress from Assignment 1 and continue building familiarity with the tools and techniques of perspectival drawing.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize the differences and applications of perspective techniques;
  2. Construct a perspective drawing with free hand techniques;
  3. Conceptualize practical applications of perspective;
  4. Utilize the proper drawing tools to create a variety of elliptical shapers;
  5. Scan and present your work in a crafted manner.

Examples:

Noah Lee, 2018
Jodi Zatezalo, 2018

 

Assignment 3: Spheres and Torus

Parameters:

Students must create two drawings for this assignment. The first is a multi-step drawing that utilizes vanishing points and a horizon line to generate boxes in two-point perspective with a variety of line weights; students inscribe spheres and the torus inside these boxes. The second is a multi-step drawing that requires the students to use observational drawing techniques to capture a small composition involving complex objects. Furthermore, students must construct preliminary compositional sketches based on positive/negative shape analysis.

Rational/Context:

Students build on their progress from Assignment 2 and continue building familiarity with the tools and techniques of perspectival drawing.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize the differences and applications of perspective techniques;
  2. Construct a perspective drawing with free hand techniques;
  3. Conceptualize practical applications of perspective;
  4. Utilize the proper drawing tools including pen and pencil to create a variety of spherical, torus, and other shapes;
  5. Demonstrate your process of creating a composition that utilizes active negative and positive shapes;
  6. Scan and present your work in a crafted manner.

 

Examples

Isabella Brown, 2018
Isabella Brown, 2018
Isabella Brown, 2018
Grace Buerk, 2018
Grace Buerk, 2018
Grace Buerk, 2018
Grace Buerk, 2018

 

Assignment 4: 100 Drawings

Parameters:

Students must create a 100 drawings that are no more than 2 minutes in length. These drawings can begin as graphite drawings must be finalized in ink and marker. Color can be added if the student has time.

Rational/Context:

At this point in the semester, the students understand basic applications of perspective but are often hesitant to employ them carefully. In short, many students are afraid to make mistakes. By having them make a lot of drawings, the students both speed up the processing of information and become more comfortable with drawing with pen.

Objectives:

  1. Rapidly render an object with only a few lines;
  2. Build definition and depth of an object with pens and markers;
  3. Scan and present your work in a crafted manner.

Examples:

Rachael Leitnaker, 2018
Rachael Leitnaker, 2018
Rachael Leitnaker, 2018
Sunmeet Gill, 2018
Sunmeet Gill, 2018
Sunmeet Gill 2018

 

Assignment 5: Analysis of an Interior

Parameters:

Students must create a diptych highlighting their observations of the elements and principles at work in the Buckeye Union. This assignment asks them to do observational sketches and note taking on site, use these insights to develop a compositional idea, execute the drawings of the spaces, and write a statement explaining their choices. The process of developing this idea has as much weight as the execution of the idea.

Rational/Context:

This is the first major assignment in the course where the students really have some autonomy and are asked to consider how the prompt will dictate the outcome of their assignment. Students meet with the instructor at least once in one-0n-one meetings to discuss initial ideas and how to visualize their observations. Multiple ideas are considered before progressing to a final solution and a final statement must be constructed explaining their decisions.

Examples:

Whitney Baxter, 2018
Whitney Baxter, 2018
Kate Belliveau, 2018
Kate Belliveau, 2018

 

Assignment 6: Orthographic Drawing and Construction

Parameters

Students are provided one view of a third-angle projection. They must utilize this view to create four different structures and drawings that function as a unit. Two of the structures are constructed in Bristol board and two are constructed in Chipboard. Additionally, they must include third-angle projections of their work, an observational drawing of one structure, documentation of their process, and a statement explaining their decision making.

Rational/Context

Up to this point in the semester, the students have primarily been exposed to perspective drawing and observational drawing. The introduction of isometric and orthographic drawing, while brief, allows the students to be exposed to another way of visualizing an idea. Furthermore, learning to visualize in three dimensions through Bristol and Chipboard offers the students another way to bring an idea into the world.

In recent years, the students have been asked to choose whether the view they have been given is representative of a building facade or an engineered object, which can change the way the drawings are created (hidden lines, or not). Finally, more students have gravitated to completing the drawings on the computer or iPad through different visualization software.

Examples

Sabrina Young, 2018
Sabrina Young, 2018
Mitchell James, 2018
Mitchell James, 2018

 

Assignment 7: Re-Map

Parameters

Students are asked to revisit one of their first projects from 2110. This project involved them writing a set of directions for a classmate to follow to a “treasure” on campus. The student who received the directions would then make a “map” of these directions in their moleskine.

The final assignment in 2310 asks them to first begin by critiquing this project from their current point of view. From here, the students must create a proposal to re-make this map. This proposal must address narrative intent, what media they will use to visualize this process, their timeline for completing these tasks, and how they will track their progress. Students write 750-1000 words in total between the preliminary analysis and final statement of intent.

Rational/Context

Giving the students a chance to improve on an earlier work for the semester allows them to reflect on their work and what they have learned to date. Leaving the choice of media to the student allows them to choose how they best visualize an idea. Having them write a critique, a proposal, and a statement of intent requires them to document their process of creation, ideation, and the scope of the prompt. The final results are unique to each student, which is often empowering to them.

Examples

The students from this semester haven’t completed this assignment yet so, for now, here are a few examples from years past:

Gabriela Avila, 2016

Shijie Li, 2017:

Shijie Li, Page 1, 2018
Shijie Li, Page 2, 2018
Shijie Li, Page 3, 2018
Shijie Li, Page 4, 2018
Shijie Li, Page 5, 2018
Shijie Li, Page 6, 2018

Nick Romanowski, 2017:

 

Responses

Parameters

Students read, listen, and watch short articles, podcasts, and videos. They are given a guiding question to respond to and visualize in their moleskine and then their ideas are discussed in class. The total number of responses for the class can vary but the usual amount is ten.

Rational/Context

Since a substantial part of the beginning of the 2310 is skill based, we use the responses to keep the students thinking about big picture ideas. Some of these prompts address so-called ‘soft’ skills, like persistence; others address perception, ethical issues that might be made manifest in design practice, and the creative process in general. The hope is that the students will begin to see their moleskines as a place where their own ideas and processes can be made manifest.

Examples

Lexi Higgins, 2018
Zongyu Liu, 2018
Boston Logan, 2018

2014-15 Course Goals Design Visualizations

Below you can find the initial set of course goals and the corresponding learning objectives from the Design Visualizations sequence. While some content has been modified since the initial rollout, the basic skeleton of this remains. Please feel free to reach out about this via the comments section or by contacting Scott Denison (Denison.17) or Michael Kellner (Kellner.30).

Thanks in advance for your feedback.

Course Goals Learning Objective
Students will appreciate the value and characteristics of pencils.

Students will gain familiarity and confidence with pencil drawing.

Students will learn how to appreciate and differentiate line quality and variation.

 

Students should be able to select the proper drawing tool to complete a task.

Students should be able to create a wide variety of quality lines using specific tools.

Students should practice creating a wide variety of lines and line qualities. Students should be able to compare and critique line and line qualities.

 

 

 

Students will grasp the fundamental elements and techniques of visualizing perspective.

 Students will appreciate the value and characteristics of perspective tools.

Students will gain familiarity and confidence with constructing perspective.

Students should be able to recognize the differences and applications of perspective techniques. (1pt – multipoint) 

Students should be able employ specific tools to construct a perspective drawing. Students should practice constructing practical applications of perspective.

Students should be able to select the proper drawing tool to complete a task.

Students should be able to create a wide variety of quality lines using specific tools.

 

 

 

Students will learn how to sketch from observation. Students should be able to recognize shape and form differences in the observable world.

Students will be able to employ the elements of perspective in observational drawing.

Students should be able to select the proper drawing tool to complete a task.

Students should be able to create a wide variety of quality lines using specific tools.

 

 

 

Students will understand the value of light and shadow in sketching.

Students will be able to apply color to 2 dimensional representations.

 

Students should practice techniques for practical applications of shadow in sketching.

Students will be able to employ the elements of color in observational and conceptual drawing.

 

 

 

Students will appreciate the value of visualizing their thought process.

 

Students should practice journaling their ideas visually.

 

Students will learn how to connect their thoughts visually. Students should practice visually connecting thoughts and ideas.

 

Students will learn how to sketch ideas quickly.

 

Students will be able to apply color to 2 dimensional representations.

Students should practice creating multiple ideas using pencil visualization techniques.

Students will be able to employ the elements of color in observational and conceptual drawing.

Students will be able to employ the elements of perspective in observational drawing.

 

Students will appreciate the value of visual diagrams. Students will be able to illustrate concepts and ideas using diagrams.
Students will learn how to appreciate typographic form and scale in 2 dimensions.

 

Students will learn how to use Adobe Creative Suite and individual software characteristics

Students should be able to create explorations of typographic form and form combinations.

Students should be able to employ Adobe Illustrator software to create typographic form explorations.

Students should be able generate lines, shapes and forms using Adobe Illustrator software.

Students will understand the basics of typographic form, hierarchy and arrangement.

Students will learn when to use different software in the Adobe Creative Suite. (Pixel vs vector).

Students will appreciate the use of grid and structure in 2 dimensional design.

Students will be able to scan and modify artwork.

Students will be able to create a visual presentation in 2 dimensions i.e., poster, page

Students will be able to create a visual presentation via media projection.

Students should be able to employ techniques of typographic hierarchy to organize and present documents.

Students should be able to demonstrate basic proficiency in page/document layout techniques through assembly in Adobe InDesign.

Students should be able to demonstrate basic proficiency in digital retouching and modification using pixel based techniques and tools in Adobe Photoshop.

Students should be able to demonstrate basic proficiency in poster layout techniques through assembly in Adobe InDesign.

Students should be able to demonstrate basic proficiency in multi-page PDF presentations through assembly in Adobe InDesign.

2014-15 Course Goals and Objectives: Design Fundamentals

Below you can find the initial set of course goals and the corresponding learning objectives from the Design Fundamentals sequence. While some content has been modified since the initial rollout, the basic skeleton of this remains. Please feel free to reach out about this via the comments section or by contacting Scott Denison (Denison.17) or Michael Kellner (Kellner.30).

Thanks in advance for your feedback.

Course Goals Learning objectives
Students will learn how to identify and use the lexicon of pattern and pattern techniques in 2 dimensions.

 

Students should be able to demonstrate pattern language, i.e.,symmetry, tessellation, rotation, reflection, spiral, etc.
Students will learn how ideate using pattern techniques by hand.

 

Students should be able create patterns using design patterning techniques.
Students will learn how to ideate and iterate using pattern techniques on the computer

 

Students should be able to rapidly iterate and ideate using pattern techniques via computer.
Students will understand the fundamentals of pattern development in 2 and 3 dimensions

 

Students should explore natural systems, and methods of evolving 2D and 3D form.
Students will appreciate how color can change pattern.

 

Students should experiment and iterate with color in patter to discover changes in depth and meaning.
Students will understand techniques to translate 2D design to 3D designs. Students will experiment with raising elevation of 2D pattern in 3D models.

Students will use patterning techniques as the basis to create a 3D model using specified materials, processes and constraints.

Students will understand the basic methods of model- making

 

Students should explore and experiment with skinning, and folding, and joining.
Students will learn how 3D patterns are scalable.

 

Students will use models to explore changes in scale from object to spatial structures.
Students will learn the fundamentals of fabrication.

 

Students should explore additive and subtractive fabrication techniques.
Students should learn the value of documentation.

 

Students will document all processes and progress, including failures, as part of project documentation.
Students will understand the properties, benefits and limitations of basic materials.

 

Students should be understand the ways to work with paper, wood, foam and/or wire
Students will understand the role of pattern and form in design.

 

Students should be able to deconstruct and explain how a form was created or evolved.
Students will understand the basic elements and vocabulary of design.

 

Students should experiment and construct moving from point to line, to plane, form, volume and space as well as value, texture, color, and time. Design Elements and Design Principles.
Students will understand how to use 2D specification drawings.

 

Students should be able to build a 3D model from specifications.

 

Students will appreciate how color and surface can be used to create meaning and user connection. Students should be able to apply color and surface to change the look and meaning of a specific model.

Students will use 3D models to compare and contrast ideas.

Students will appreciate the role of research in the design process.

 

Students should be able to conduct secondary research.
Students will apply critical thinking to solve a design challenge.

 

Students should be able to construct solutions within highly constrained requirements.
Students should learn how to integrate different materials and processes.

 

Students should be able to construct a model with specified parts of different materials.
Students will understand how to think outside the box, creative thinking, “what if?”, possibility-thinking. Students should experiment with free-form creative, ideation processes. Students should analyze ideas against objectives.

Students should be able to select and compare ideas.

To develop a rigorous work ethic and self-motivated mindset necessary to be creative and innovative.

 

Students should be able to calculate time required to complete a task. (time management)