Fujita Lab

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR:


KENTARO FUJITA received his B.A. in Psychology from Harvard College, and his M.A. and PhD. in Psychology from New York University. He is currently a Professor of Psychology at OSU. He is broadly interested in how motivation and cognition dynamically interact to influence evaluation, judgment, decision, and behavior. His most recent work examines the cognitive and motivational mechanisms that underlie self-control decisions and other self-regulatory phenomena. He is also interested in what motivates change at the individual-, group-, and system-level. [CV]

 

 

POST-DOCTORAL SCHOLAR:


LAURA HILDEBRAND received her B.A. in Psychology and English from Hendrix College and her M.S. and PhD. in Psychology from Purdue University. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow in The Ohio State University Social Psychology program. Laura’s research takes a solution-focused approach that examines not only obstacles to diversity and inclusion (e.g., prejudice), but also how we can overcome such obstacles using theoretically-driven strategies. Specifically, her research asks: What strategies reduce the activation and application of bias, in both others and ourselves? How do these strategies influence feelings of belonging, safety, and inclusion among marginalized group members? And how do subtle manifestations of bias perpetuate and reinforce non-inclusive environments?

 

PRIMARY & SECONDARY DOCTORAL STUDENTS:

PHUONG LE received her B.A. in Psychology and International Studies from the University at Buffalo, SUNY and her M.A. in Psychology from The Ohio State University. She is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Social Psychology program. Her research interests encompass topics in motivation, self-regulation, and perspectives. She is investigating how subjective perceptions influence people’s strategies for pursuing valued goals and facilitate effective communication.

 


SEULBEE LEE
received her B.B.A. in Business Administration from Sogang University, M.A. in Psychology from Yonsei University, and M.A. in Psychology at The Ohio State University. Seulbee is currently a fifth-year doctoral student in the Social Psychology program. Her research interests broadly include emotion, motivation, self-control, and construal level. She is primarily interested in exploring the role of psychological factors in self-control and decision-making.

 

ARIANA HERNANDEZ-COLMENARES received her B.A. in Psychology from San Diego State University. Ariana is currently a second-year doctoral student in the Social Psychology program. She is broadly interested in psychological interventions aimed to increase academic achievement and motivation among underrepresented, first generation students. Her current research examines how mindset certainty–how sure one is of their fixed vs. growth mindsets– affects people’s persuasion and/or resistance to change their personal beliefs. She aims to examine people’s metacognitions about their mindset beliefs and whether these metacognitions can influence the ultimate impact of those mindsets.

 


SAMI LAPKA
 received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Missouri in 2020. After graduating she worked as a lab manager for the Conflict and Mindset Collaboratory in the Industrial-Organizational Psychology Department at Purdue University. She is a first-year doctoral student in the Social Psychology program. Her research interests broadly include mindset, self-control, social perception, motivation, and interpersonal relationships. Currently, she is investigating lay beliefs about self-control, and how differences in these beliefs can impact self-control success and interpersonal relationships.

 


ALLISON LONDERÉE
received her B.S. in Neuroscience from The Ohio State University and her M.A. in Psychology at The Ohio State University. She is currently a fifth-year doctoral student in the Social Psychology program. Broadly, Allison seeks to examine the intersection between cognitive control and affective processes and how these processes impact motivation, reward and self-control in day-to-day life. Ultimately, she plans to elucidate neural markers that can characterize individual differences in behavioral function.

 


STEPHANIE STEWART-HILL
received her B.A. in Psychology with minors in Statistics and Spanish from the University at Buffalo, SUNY. She is a second-year doctoral student in the Social Psychology program. Her research interests include how subjective perspectives influence the self, social cognition, emotion, and power. She is currently investigating how social power and goals influence socio-cognitive processes.