New mental health resource for Ohioans!

“Have you thought about talking to someone about that?” If you experience anxiety, depression, or another mental health challenge, working with a professional can be very helpful. But navigating the health care system is not always as simple as calling your local counselor and making an appointment. You have to figure out which providers take your insurance, how many sessions are covered, and what your co-pay might be. If you don’t have insurance, there are even more questions to ask. It can be a little overwhelming to figure out your benefits on your own, so call the Ohio Mental Health Insurance Assistance office for help.

From their website: “This free service is for individuals, families, and behavioral health providers who need help understanding and accessing their mental health and substance use disorder benefits. Whether you have health insurance through an employer, a government program, purchased it directly through an agent, or are uninsured, we can help.  We’ll help you understand your mental health coverage, assist you in getting the most from your mental health insurance for treatment, and facilitate investigations on your behalf if you experience treatment access issues due to insurance.”

Get started today by calling 1-855-438-6442. Recovery from a mental health challenge is possible and probable, and the Ohio Mental Health Insurance Assistance Office can help you start that journey to recovery!

East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference

OSU Extension to Host 2023 East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference

Ohio State University (OSU) Extension will host the 8th Annual East Ohio Women in Agriculture Conference. The conference is planned for Friday, March 24 from 9:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the Shisler Conference Center, 1680 Madison Ave, Wooster, OH 44691. All women and young women (high school age) who are interested, involved in, or want to become involved with food, agricultural, or natural resources production or small business are encouraged to attend. Click here for a printable flyer

The conference program features a networking fair and sixteen breakout sessions presented by OSU Extension educators, producers, and partner agencies. Sessions this year are focused around four themes Business & Finance, Plants & Animals, Home & Family, and Special Interest (includes break-out with Ohio FFA State Officers). The conference keynote will be led by Rebecca Miller, Farm and Dairy Editor-in-Chief. Her keynote presentation “Clinging to context in a noisy world: don’t lose sight of the “why” in what you do” will.  Agriculture is often so much more to us than a job, which makes it hard when we face push back — from people around us and from influences outside of our control.  Rebecca will share her path through farming and journalism and how she’s grappled with the questions.  New this year is a Youth Symposium opportunity for high school and college students to present their research, SEA, capstone, thesis, or other study projects.

Registered participants, community organizations, or businesses interested in sponsorship can contact 740-722-6074.

Interested individuals can register for the conference online at go.osu.edu/eowia2023 .Cost of the conference is $60 for adult participants and $30 for students. Conference fee includes conference participation, breakfast, lunch, and conference handouts. Deadline for registration is Friday, March 10. For additional information locally, please contact Emily Marrison, OSU Extension Coshocton County at 740-722-6074.

Stay connected with the Ohio Women in Agriculture Learning Network on Facebook @OHwomeninag or subscribe to the Ohio Women in Agriculture blogsite at u.osu.edu/ohwomeninag.

988 Crisis Lifeline PSA

The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline has been live for nearly a month now, and individuals and organizations across the state of Ohio are working diligently to share information about this resource with friends, family, and neighbors.

This new, easy-to-remember number can be used by anyone in the United States who is experiencing suicidal thoughts, emotional distress, thoughts of harming others, or substance use concerns. When you dial 988, you will be connected with a trained counselor who will help you reduce the stress of the crisis and find local resources to help support you in the future.

Bridget Britton, Behavioral Health Field Specialist for Ohio State University Extension, recently sat down and recorded a PSA that you can use to spread the word about 988. Watch this short video and then share on your social media pages today! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fse9ryxGjz4&ab_channel=OSUSouthCenters

Making the Switch to 988!

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline has been in existence since 2005. The Lifeline has been an invaluable resource for people to use in a suicide crisis situation, and now a new initiative has made it even easier for people to connect with trained counselors in times of distress. Anyone in the United States can now call or text 988 to reach the Lifeline when they are in a state of emotional distress, having thoughts of suicide, having thoughts of harming others, or having substance use concerns.

In addition to the new, easy-to-remember number, the Lifeline has expanded the services it offers. Traditionally, the Lifeline primarily focused on supporting individuals experiencing a suicide crisis situation. It now also offers support for someone who would like to talk through the distress they are experiencing related to anxiety, depression, or substance use.

Just as when people called the Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (which will continue to remain in service), a person who calls or texts 988 will be linked to a trained professional such as a counselor, therapist, or social worker for support. These counselors are trained to reduce the stress of the challenge or crisis, provide emotional support, and link the caller to services in their local area for additional assistance. Research has shown that most calls to the Lifeline can be managed or resolved over the phone.

Help us break down the stigma of receiving support by promoting 988! There is no shame in seeking out support.

Here is a list of common signs a person may need to talk with a mental health professional:

  • New or unusual fatigue
  • Increased irritability
  • Depression lasted more than 2 weeks
  • Social isolation
  • Changes in appetite or sleep patterns
  • Thoughts of suicide or self-harm
  • Difficulty following through with tasks at work or school

Most of these signs are compounded on top of each other and last for several weeks.

The switch to the new 988 number has been a work in progress for several years, and it will take some time to spread the word within our communities. You can help spread the word today by sharing this information on your personal or professional social media pages, or by visiting https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/988/partner-toolkit to find resources that can be shared at locations throughout your community.

When the Rain Won’t Let Up

By:  Bridget Britton, Behavioral Field Specialist, OSU Extension

Each morning when waking up recently it feels as though we look out the window and it is either raining or has rained overnight. Farmers are natural meteorologists and are in tune with what is going on with the weather at any given hour of the day.

According to Aaron Wilson, Ohio State University Extension climatologist, there has been measurable rainfall on all but 3 days so far in the month of April. Wet weather and planting delays are sources of additional stress. Though we can’t know for sure when the fields will dry up enough to plant, there are things you can do to keep some of the stress from overwhelming you.

  • Get moving: This is normally when the physical activity starts ramping up. You might not be out busy in the fields yet but start prepping your body and mind now by doing whatever exercise you enjoy to get in the right mindset. This “exercise” might include working on equipment, cleaning your shop, or catching up on things you’ve been putting off.
  • Make time for laughs: Have you ever heard laughter is the best medicine? Well, it might not be the best, but it can help. Make sure you find time to spend with your funny family member or employee. You know who they are. Continue reading