Fall Pumpkin Program

Pumpkins are a fall tradition. From Jack-o’-lanterns to pumpkin pie, they signal the beginning of the fall season. Join us Thursday, October 7, 2021 at the Greene County Extension for an evening of all things pumpkin! We will start with some Pumpkin Fun Facts presented by the host, Kim Hupman, OSU Extension Greene County Horticulture Program Assistant. Jim Jasinski, OSU Extension Integrated Pest Management Program Coordinator, will talk about the 5 Key Pest of Pumpkins. Laura Halladay, OSU Extension Greene County Family and Consumer Science Educator, will teach us how to prepare a fresh pumpkin to use in recipes and provide a selection of tastings using pumpkin. Her presentation, Pumpkins: Not Just for Pie, will have you experiencing pumpkin in a whole new way! Finally we will wrap it up with Bryan Reeb, Giant Pumpkin Grower, on How to Grow Giant Pumpkins: The Basics from Start to Finish along with some seeds from his giant pumpkins.

 

When: Thursday, October 7, 2021

Location: 100 Fairground Rd., Xenia, Ohio 45385

Cost: $10.00

Contact: Kim Hupman at hupman.5@osu.edu or Laura Halladay at Halladay.6@osu.edu

Registration: go.osu.edu/gcpumpkins

 

This program will be held in person at the OSU Extension Greene County office, Ohio State University Extension follows current University and Local Public Health COVID-19 protocols.

Kitchen Table Conversations hosted during the Farm Science Review

Grab a cup of your favorite beverage, lunch, or snack and join us from your “kitchen table” to engage in conversations “virtually” on September 21, 22, and 23, 2021 for “Kitchen Table Conversations” hosted by the Ohio Women in Agriculture of Ohio State University Extension. Conversations and discussions on “hot topics” in the agricultural world related to health, marketing, finance, legal, and production for women in agriculture.

These sessions are offered during the Farm Science Review daily from 11:00 AM-12:00 PM via ZOOM. Registration is required to participate.

Register @ https://go.osu.edu/kitchentableconversations2021

Flyer

CONVERSATION TOPICS…

9|21 Raising Livestock on Five Acres or Less

So you have some land and you want some extra income or a supply of food for your family.  This session will investigate all of your options and possibilities.

Sandy Smith, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Carrol County

9|22 Farm Stress and Mental Health

It can be hard to have a conversation about our mental health, but it is just as important as acknowledging our physical health. When we live where we work stress can sometimes get the better of us. Sitting together as a family around the kitchen table fosters an environment to have tough conversations. During this session, we will have a conversation about the importance of addressing mental health concerns, how to bridge the difficult topics, and the resources that are available to you and your family.

Bridget Britton MSW, LSW….Behavioral Health Field Specialist ANR

 

9\23 On-Farm Research Opportunities

On-farm research can provide valuable local data to inform decision-making and help you understand the ROI of practices and technologies on your farm. The OSU eFields program fosters partnerships between Ohio farmers, industry, and OSU researchers. Learn about recent research trials conducted across the state and how to become involved in the program.

Elizabeth Hawkins, Ph.D…Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems, Assistant Professor

FSR 2021 is finally only a week away!!

Farm Science Review 2021

Farm Science Review 2021

Farm Science Review is just a week away, held September 21st – 23rd with lots of excitement in store for farmers young and old. There will be a lot of new equipment and technology to view as you walk around the show grounds and of course milk shakes and delicious sandwiches from the OSU student organizations. OSU also has some exciting areas for you to stop by and learn more about agricultural practices being studied at OSU and view some of the latest technology in action.

Agronomy plots area

One major yield thief in both corn and soybeans is compaction. We will show how the utilization of tracks and various types of tires can affect your crop, especially in pinch row compaction. Very high flexation tires can decrease field compaction by lowering inflation pressure once in the field. Deflating after road travel will maximize the tire footprint. See this demonstrated in the plots with a tractor that has tires on one side inflated to road pressure and the other to field pressure. Knowing the correct inflation pressure to the exact psi is critical. Stop in the morning, to enter a raffle to win a high accuracy tire pressure gauge by guessing the inflation pressures on this tractor both for road travel and field use. The winner of the raffle with the proper inflation pressure will be announced each day at noon.

Our work with producers around that state to maximize corn and soybean yields is demonstrated in a set of high yield plots.  The plots are receiving the exact amount of water they need each week utilizing soil moisture sensors to determine the irrigation amount need. The plots are also being spoon-fed nutrients to make sure nothing limits their ability to maximize yield. These maximum yield plots are much taller and greener this year than the traditional management plots.

Another area we have focused on is cover crops and how to help producers implement them into their operation. Cover crop management can be a challenge though at times. One of the management challenges demonstrated this year is the tough decision of, should your agronomic crop be planted once the cover crop is terminated or while it is still green. Cover crops can be killed utilizing herbicide or a roller-crimper. Crimping these cover crops at the proper growth stage is important for termination. Before we terminate cover crops, we must establish them. One of the challenges with establishment is herbicide carryover. Various herbicides have different effects on our ability to establish the cover crop. Learn more about the interaction of herbicides and cover crops in our plots. We also inter-seeded 11 different species of potential cover crops for you to see how well they can survive under a corn canopy in this year’s plots.

While cover crops can protect the soil during heavy rain fall events and their roots can help improve soil health, they can also be utilized as a forage source for livestock. Selecting the best cover crop for both needs can increase farm profitability. These cover crop forages can be summer or winter annuals. The incorporation of perennial forages into your farm can have numerous benefits. We have planted many of these perennial forages for you to view and understand why they may be right for your farm.

There is nowhere near enough space in the agronomy plots to show you all the research being done in Ohio to assist growers. To learn about more research, we have going on around the state or how to conduct research on your farm, pick up your own copy of the eFields on-farm research report.  Additionally, you will have the opportunity to learn even more about our research by taking virtual reality tours of our research stations while visiting us at the agronomic plots. Take time to learn more about where wheat in Ohio goes and how it ends up on your neighbor’s plate. You can also interact with our water quality team to learn more about conservation practices for your farm that will improve the quality of water leaving your farm.

iFarm Immersive Theatre

New for the 2021 Farm Science Review is the iFarm Immersive Theatre! Visit the iFarm Immersive Theatre for an experience like an IMAX theater for viewing agriculture-based films. Topics include a ride on a crop duster applying fungicide, exploration of natural habitats, inside a beehive, multiple machinery demonstrations, and more! The iFarm Immersive Theatre is brought to you by Nationwide, Ohio Farm Bureau, and OSU Extension.

Digital Ag

The “Ag Innovation Demos” is a proving ground for evaluating future technologies and data driven cropping practices.  This 15-acre field is located in the demonstration fields at Farm Science Review.

·        Automated Turn Demonstration (John Deere and Case IH)

·        OminiDrive – Autonomous Grain Cart (Precision Agri Services and CNH Industrial)

·        Drone Scouting (Integrated Ag/Taranus)

·        Intra-Canopy Drone Scouting (Ohio State)

·        Drone Spraying (Rantizo, Hylio and Beck’s Hybrids)

Field Demos

Field Demo Schedule

Field Demo Schedule

CCA credits available at FSR

Tuesday, September 21

CCA Schedule - Tuesday

CCA Schedule – Tuesday

Wednesday, September 22

CCA Schedule - Wednesday

CCA Schedule – Wednesday

Thursday, September 23

CCA Schedule - Thursday

CCA Schedule – Thursday

CROP OBSERVATION AND RECOMMENDATION NETWORK

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

CORN Newsletter

September 14-20, 2021

 

Editor: Ken Ford

 

FSR 2021 is finally only a week away!!

Authors: Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Amanda Douridas, Mary Griffith, Elizabeth Hawkins

Farm Science Review is just a week away, held September 21st – 23rd with lots of excitement in store for farmers young and old.

Read more

 

Diagnosis of Tar Spot Late in the Season

Author: Pierce Paul

Understandably, tar spot has been the focus of our attention this year, as it has been detected in more than 20 counties.

Read more

 

Foliar Diseases May Affect Stalk Strength and Quality

Authors: Pierce Paul, Peter Thomison

Causes of Stalk Rot: Several factors may contribute to stalk rot, including extreme weather conditions, inadequate fertilization, problems with nutrient uptake, insects, and diseases.

Read more

 

Life In A Time of Glyphosate Scarcity – Part 1 – Burndown In No-Till Wheat

Author: Mark Loux

It’s been a strange couple of years.  Shortages and supply chain problems (ask any cyclist who likes to break things often).  And just when you think anything else couldn’t happen, the supply of glyphosate, which is usually way more abundant than water in the American West, has apparently become

Read more

 

Drainage installation and conservation practice field demonstrations at the 2021 Farm Science Review

Authors: Vinayak Shedekar, Elizabeth Rose Schwab

Have you ever wondered how subsurface tile drainage is installed in farm fields? The Farm Science Review (FSR), held from September 21–23, brings you an opportunity to view live demonstrations of the drainage tile installation process.

Read more

 

About C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

 

Contributors:

 

Glen Arnold, CCA
Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management

 

Lee Beers, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Carrie Brown
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Taylor Dill
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Amanda Douridas
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Nick Eckel
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jamie Hampton
Extension Educator, ANR

 

Jason Hartschuh, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Elizabeth Hawkins
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Andrew Holden
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dean Kreager
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Alan Leininger
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mark Loux
State Specialist, Weed Science

 

David Marrison
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Andy Michel
State Specialist, Entomology

 

Rich Minyo
Research Specialist

 

Les Ober, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Pierce Paul
State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases

 

Richard Purdin
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Eric Richer, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dennis Riethman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mitchell Roth
State Specialist, Plant Pathology

 

Clint Schroeder
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Kelley Tilmon
State Specialist, Field Crop Entomology

 

Barry Ward
Program Leader

 

Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Aaron Wilson
Byrd Polar & Climate Research Center

 

Ted Wiseman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Curtis Young, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Chris Zoller
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.

CROP ALERT AND YARD ALERT! IT’S ARMYWORM

Calls started coming in about an armyworm that was devouring lawns, pastures, meadows, and alfalfa fields across Ohio. Upon collection of larvae for identification, it was easily IDed as the fall armyworm.
The fall armyworm and a close relative, the yellow striped armyworm do not overwinter in Ohio, they must migrate into the state through the summer from the south. Apparently, both species of armyworm have been exploding down south. The adults from these southern populations were swept up in summer storm fronts and pushed north. The adults of these species have been recorded to fly up to 500 miles under their own power as well.
About 2 to 2 ½ weeks ago, egg masses were observed on many items including fence posts, signposts and insect traps used to monitor other insects. Each female moth can lay egg masses of 10-20 eggs up to 100 or more at a time. These eggs hatched in 5-7 days. The larvae (caterpillars) then dropped onto plants below and started feeding. The tiny caterpillar feeding activity was relatively unnoticeable, but now that the caterpillars are older and larger, they appear to be almost eating everything in their path including each other when the food plants run out.
This damage could continue for a couple of more weeks. Thus, if you have a yard or crop field suffering from fall armyworm activity, you may need to treat the infestation with an insecticide.
The following information is for turfgrass infestations from Dr. Dave Shetlar, Ohio State University Professor Emeritus of Entomology:
“For commercial applicators, any of the pyrethroids will work well against fall or yellow striped armyworms. Bifenthrin (Talstar and many generics), lambda-cyhalothrin (Scimitar), gamma-cyhalothrin, beta-cyfluthrin (Tempo Ultra), Permethrin, etc., are common examples. Sprays are much more effective and rapid acting compared to granules. Sprays will usually kill most of the larvae within 24 hours, but granules may take 3-5 days to achieve maximum kill. This is simply due to exposure.
For homeowners, there are many over-the-counter products. Some of the most common “name brand” products are: Ortho Bug B-Gon (bifenthrin); Ortho Lawn Insect Killer (bifenthrin); Spectricide Triazicide Insect Killer for Lawns (gamma-cyhalothrin) granule and hose-end spray; Garden Tech “Sevin” (contains zeta-cypermethrin, NOT carbaryl which used to be in these containers) granule and spray; Scotts Summerguard Lawn Food with Insect Control (bifenthrin); Bayer Complete Insect Killer for lawns (Imidacloprid plus beta-cyfluthrin) granule and spray. I’m sure there are more out there.”
Similar products are available for agricultural crops and can be found in a new joint publication from Ohio State University and Michigan State University at: https://aginsects.osu.edu/news/msu-osu-insect-ipm-guide

Extraordinary Fall Webworm Outbreak – Yellow Springs

Extraordinary Fall Webworm Outbreak

Authors
Published on

Fall Webworm (Hyphantria cunea) has two overlapping generations per season in Ohio.  The “fall” in the webworm’s common name is based on the moth caterpillars becoming more apparent late in the season due to larger second-generation nests than those produced by the first generation.

 

However, “large” and “apparent” are understatements for describing the fall webworm outbreak in Yellow Springs, Greene County, OH.  Thanks to some dramatic images taken by Rachel Hoverman and sent by Curtis Young (both with OSU Extension, Van Wert County), my wife and I took a Sunday drive yesterday to the village located just north of Xenia on State Route 68.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall webworms are taking center stage in a village best known for its namesake spring, Antioch College, excellent local eateries, and The Little Miami Scenic Trail.  Black walnut (Juglans nigra) trees are the most common host for the outbreak with large mature trees completely wrapped in webbing and stripped of their foliage.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

Every nest that I opened only contained the “red-headed biotype.”  I believe this accounted for the spectacularly large nests, but more about that later.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Images of entire trees encased in fall webworm silk can be found on the Web; however, I’ve never observed this first-hand.  Silk lines ran down main stems connecting one nest to the next which is rare for fall webworm.  The webworms were behaving more like what we see with eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum) during one of their outbreaks in the spring.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

eastern tent caterpillar

 

I’ve also never seen red-headed biotype caterpillars feeding on leaves outside of their protective silk fortifications.  Mature trees shrouded in silk and wandering starving caterpillars searching for more foliage-food are on display in Yellow Springs and speak to the massive, localized webworm population.

 

Fall Webworm

 

It’s worth a trip to Yellow Springs.  You can spend the day webworm sightseeing and end the day at a fine restaurant.  Just mind the frass (insect excrement) if you sit outdoors.

 

Fall Webworm

 

 

 

Silky Behavior

Fall webworm caterpillars usually feed in groups beneath their protective webbing.  Early instars feed as skeletonizers on the upper or lower leaf surfaces consuming everything except the opposite leaf epidermis and the leaf veins.  Skeletonized leaves turn brown making their nests even more obvious.  Later instars eat everything except the largest leaf veins.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

First-generation female moths often lay their eggs on or near the nests from which they developed.  The resulting second-generation caterpillars then expand the nests constructed by first-generation caterpillars.

 

However, the nests can be a mixed bag because caterpillar development is not synchronized.  There may be late instar first-generation caterpillars co-mingling with second-generation caterpillars as the nests are being expanded.  On the other hand, I only observed late instars in every nest that I opened in Yellow Springs.

 

The moth caterpillars normally only eat leaves that are enveloped by their silk.  However, it’s obvious in Yellow Springs that the caterpillars will dispense with maintaining a silk barrier between themselves and their numerous enemies if they are desperate for food.  I observed this on a redbud growing within the dripline of a defoliated black walnut.  The starving webworms produced sparse webbing as they moved onto the redbud.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

This native moth has a very wide host range.  The caterpillars have been recorded on over 400 species of trees and shrubs including fruit trees.  However, black walnut (Juglans nigra) seems to be a favored host, particularly for the red-headed biotype.  On the other hand, as noted above, it was obvious in Yellow Springs that the caterpillars will readily expand their palate once they defoliate black walnut.  Look closely at the image below and you’ll see a defoliated black walnut behind the infested street trees.

 

Fall Webworm

 

 

The Importance of Biotypes

The ultimate nest size depends on the webworm biotype.  Fall webworms come in two distinct forms, known as biotypes:  black-head and red-headed.  They are so-named because of the color of their head capsules although the head capsules of late instar red-headed webworms may darken before pupation.

 

Caterpillars of both biotypes are very hairy but differ in body coloration, nesting behavior, dates for spring adult emergence, and to some extent, host preferences.  Indeed, some entomologists are proposing that these biotypes should be considered different species or subspecies.

 

The two biotypes are more than an entomological curiosity.  Black-headed fall webworm nests appear to include caterpillars from only a few egg masses.  They tend to produce small, compact nests that envelop only a dozen or so leaves.  However, several of these small communal nests may be found on the same branch and it’s common to see the nests sprinkled randomly throughout tree canopies when moth populations are high.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

Red-headed fall caterpillars are far more cooperative; their communal nests may include caterpillars from a large number of egg masses.  Thus, they can produce some truly spectacular multilayered nests enveloping the leaves on entire branches or even entire trees.  This biotype is the more damaging of the two.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

Historically, the red-headed biotype was confined to the northeast and eastern parts of Ohio and black-headed caterpillars were found elsewhere in the state.  However, this appears to be changing.

 

Since 2016, I have been finding red-headed caterpillars in southwest Ohio.  In fact, this biotype is the dominant form this season in my part of the state.  Curtis Young (OSU Extension, Van Wert County) is also reporting a rise in the red-headed biotype in the northwest part of the state.  Obviously, the red-headed biotype is dominating the Yellow Springs region.

 

 

 

Management Options

Fall webworms are native to Ohio.  They co-evolved with their native tree hosts.  Under normal circumstances, the webworms do not cause significant harm to the overall health of their native hosts.  The most significant defoliation occurs late the season after trees have produced and stored enough carbohydrates to support leaf development next spring.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Of course, this perspective applies to mature, established trees.  It may be a different matter for young trees, newly planted trees, or fruit trees.  A continuous supply of carbohydrates is important to fruit development and sizing.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Regardless, it’s too late to apply meaningful management options to curb the outbreak in Yellow Springs.  However, help is most certainly on the way.  There is a high probability that natural events will cause the dramatic populations to “crash.”  Foxes and rabbits provide a good example.

 

As a native insect, fall webworms have certainly drawn the attention of the “3-Ps”:  predators, parasitoids, and pathogens.  There are over 50 species of parasitoids and 36 species of predators known to make a living on fall webworms.  I posted an Alert in 2019 describing the complete destruction of a fall webworm nest by ground beetle larvae (family Carabidae).  The 3-Ps are the primary reason year-to-year fall webworm populations can rise and fall dramatically.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Fall Webworm

 

Currently, Yellow Springs appears to be the primary focus for this webworm outbreak in southwest Ohio.  We observed few nests as we drove into the village from the southwest.  The number and size of the nests declined as we drove south on S.R. 68.

 

Fall Webworm

 

Whether or not this means the outbreak will progress outward next season from the Yellow Springs focal point remains to be seen.  However, the current dramatic outbreak suggests that those living in the region should monitor their trees for the development of first-generation nests early in the season.  Eliminating first-generation nests on small trees will help to reduce the development of the more expansive and damaging second-generation nests.

 

 

 

CORN Newsletter

 

August 10 – 16, 2021

 

Editor: Amanda Douridas

 

Weather Update: Hot and Humid Conditions Return

Author: Aaron Wilson

Summary

Read more

 

Hazy Days…How Does Light Influence Corn and Soybean?

Authors: Alexander Lindsey, Laura Lindsey, Aaron Wilson

Quite often this summer, our skies have been filled with smoke from western wildfires.

Read more

 

Report Examines U.S. Corn Production Practices and Trends

Author: Chris Zoller

In the July 2021 report Trends in Production Practices and Costs of the U.S.

Read more

 

August 12th CORN Live Focuses on Ohio Yield Potential for Corn and Soybeans for 2021

Author: Mary Griffith

Matt Reese, Editor of Ohio’s Country Journal, will be joining OSU Extension’s CORN Live webinar this Thursday to report corn and soybean yield estimates collected through OCJ’s 2021 Ohio Crop Tour, which is underway this week.  Along with Matt, Extension educators Taylor Dill, John Barker, and Ch

Read more

 

No-Till Field Days 2021

Author: Taylor Dill

This August we have a variety of No-Till field days throughout the state. On August 19th, we have two half day options. One event is in the morning from 9 a.m. to noon at the Fred Yoder Farm in Plain City and another is in the evening from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Read more

 

Regional Field Days Focus on Cover Crop Application and Termination

Author: Mary Griffith

OSU Extension will host two educational field days focused on soil health and cover crops next week.

Read more

 

Specialty Dairy to host No-Till Event

Author: Amanda Douridas

The Woodruff Farm will host a special Ohio No-Till program at 3143 E. US 36, Urbana OH. John Fulton will lead off at 1:00 pm with “Precision Planting in No-till.” He is an OSU Agricultural Engineer and a native of Miami County. OSU is testing/demonstrating the newest technology on planters.

Read more

 

Upcoming Events

 

August 10

 

2021 Manure Science Review

 

August 11

 

Tri-State Precision Agriculture Conference

 

August 12

 

2021 Clean Sweep: Agricultural Pesticide Disposal, Morrow County

 

August 13

 

Northwest Ohio Soil Health Tour

 

August 17

 

Southwest Ohio Corn Growers & Fayette County Agronomy Field Day

 

August 19

 

Ohio No-Till Field Day (Plain City)

 

August 19

 

Ohio No-Till Field Day (Greenville)

 

August 24

 

2021 Clean Sweep: Agricultural Pesticide Disposal, Butler County

 

August 26

 

Agronomy Update

 

August 27

 

Ohio No-Till Event (Urbana)

 

About C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

 

Contributors:

 

Glen Arnold, CCA
Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management

 

Mark Badertscher
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Lee Beers, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Bruce Clevenger, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Wayne Dellinger, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Nick Eckel
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mary Griffith
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jamie Hampton
Extension Educator, ANR

 

Greg LaBarge, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Alan Leininger
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mark Loux
State Specialist, Weed Science

 

David Marrison
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Gigi Neal
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Sarah Noggle
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Tony Nye
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Pierce Paul
State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases

 

Richard Purdin
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Eric Richer, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Matthew Schmerge
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Clint Schroeder
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mark Sulc
State Specialist, Forage Production

 

Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Hallie Williams
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Ted Wiseman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Curtis Young, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

Ohio New and Small Farm Colleges Set for 2021

Bringing small farms in Ohio to life is the theme of the New and Small Farm College program that has been offered to farm families since 2005. The program focuses on the increasing number of new and small farm landowners that have a need for comprehensive farm ownership and management programming.

The mission of the college is to provide a greater understanding of production practices, economics of land use choices, assessment of personal and natural resources, marketing alternatives, and the identification of sources of assistance.

The New and Small Farm College has three educational objectives:

  1. To improve the economic development of small farm family-owned farms in
  2. To help small farm landowners and families diversify their opportunities into successful new enterprises and new
  3. To improve agricultural literacy among small farm landowners not actively involved in agricultural

 

Since the program began, the New and Small Farm College has now reached over 1175 participants from 57 Ohio Counties representing almost 900 farms.

 

If you are a small farm landowner wondering what to do with your acreage, ask yourself these questions:

 

Are you interested in exploring options for land uses but not sure where to turn or how to begin?

 

Have you considered adding an agricultural or horticultural enterprise, but you just aren’t sure of what is required, from an equipment, labor, and/or a management perspective?

 

Are you looking for someplace to get some basic farm information?

 

If you or someone you know answered yes to any of these questions, then the Ohio State University New and Small Farm College program may be just what you are looking for.

 

The Ohio State University New and Small Farm College is a 7-session short course that will be held one night a week.  The 2021 Ohio New and Small Farm College program will be held in three locations across the state including:

 

Pike County area, to be held at the OSU South Centers facility, 1864 Shyville Road, Piketon, Ohio 45661, (Located off US 32 – Appalachian Hwy). Classes will be held on Wednesday evenings beginning August 18 and concluding September 29, 2021. For more information contact Pike County Extension Office at 740-289-4837.

 

Fayette county area, Fayette County Extension Office, 1415 US Route 22 SW, Washington Court House, Ohio 43160. Classes will be held on Thursday evenings beginning August 19 and concluding on September 30, 2021. For more information contact the Fayette County Extension Office at 740-335-1150.

 

Wayne County area, to be held at the OSU Wooster Campus, The Shisler Conference Center, 1680 Madison Avenue, Wooster, Ohio 44961. Classes will be held on Tuesday evenings beginning August 31 and concluding October 12, 2021. For more information, contact Wayne County Extension at 330-264-8722.

 

All colleges will start each evening at 6:00 pm with a light dinner with the nightly presentations beginning at 6:30 pm and concluding at 9:00 pm.

 

Topics that will be covered in the Small Farm College course include:

  • Getting Started (goal setting, family matters, resource inventory, business planning)
  • Appropriate Land Use -Walking the Farm
  • Where to Get Assistance, (identifying various agencies, organizations, and groups)
  • Financial and Business Mgmt.: Strategies for decision makers
  • Farm Insurance
  • Soils
  • Legal Issues
  • Marketing Alternatives

 

In addition to the classroom instruction, participants will receive tickets to attend the 2021 Farm Science Review (www.fsr.osu.edu ), September 21, 22, & 23 Located at the Molly Caren Farm, London, Ohio. A soil sample analysis will also be provided to each participating farm.

 

The cost of the course is $125 per person, $100 for an additional family member.  Each participating family will receive a small farm college notebook full of the information presented in each class session plus additional materials.

 

Registrations are now being accepted. For more details about the course and/or a registration form, contact Tony Nye, Small Farm Program Coordinator 937-382-0901 or email at nye.1@osu.edu.

CORN Newsletter 22-2021

 

July 13 – 19

 

Editor: Stephanie Karhoff

 

Soybean Defoliation: It Takes a lot to Really Matter!

Authors: Curtis Young, CCA, Kelley Tilmon

The mid-season defoliators are beginning to show up in soybean fields across Ohio.

Read more

 

Tar Spot Showing Early this Year: a Note on Diagnosis

Author: Pierce Paul

I have so far only received one confirmed report of Tar Spot in the state, but the fact that the disease has been reported in a few neighboring states has some stakeholders asking questions about diagnosis and management. Tar Spot is a relatively easy disease to diagnose.

Read more

 

Pre-harvest Sprouting and Falling Number

Authors: Pierce Paul, Laura Lindsey, Wanderson B. Moraes

Persistent rainfall over the last several days has prevented some wheat fields from being harvested. This could lead to pre-harvest sprouting and other grain quality issues.

Read more

 

Nutrient Value of Wheat Straw

Authors: Laura Lindsey, Ed Lentz, CCA

Before removing straw from the field, it is important farmers understand the nutrient value.

Read more

 

Steps to Speed up Field Curing of Hay Crops

Authors: Mark Sulc, Jason Hartschuh, CCA, Allen Gahler

The rainy weather in many regions of Ohio and surrounding states is making it difficult to harvest hay crops.  We usually wait for a clear forecast before cutting hay, and with good reason because hay does not dry in the rain!

Read more

 

Late Wheat Harvest and Grain Quality Concerns

Authors: Laura Lindsey, Pierce Paul

Most of the winter wheat in Ohio has been harvested. However, persistent wet weather has delayed harvest in some areas of the state.

Read more

 

Western Bean Cutworm Numbers Begin to Increase Across Ohio

Authors: Amy Raudenbush, Suranga Basnagala , Aaron Wilson, Olivia Lang, Kyle Akred, Angela Arnold, Mark Badertscher, Jordan Beck, Frank Becker, Lee Beers, CCA, Bruce Clevenger, CCA, Tom Dehaas, Taylor Dill, Nick Eckel, Allen Gahler, Jamie Hampton, Andrew Holden, James Jasinski, Stephanie Karhoff, Alan Leininger, Ed Lentz, CCA, Cecilia Lokai-Minnich, David Marrison, Jess McWatters, Sarah Noggle, Les Ober, CCA, Maggie Pollard, Eric Richer, CCA, Beth Scheckelhoff, Clint Schroeder, Mike Sunderman, Curtis Young, CCA, Chris Zoller, Andy Michel, Kelley Tilmon

Western bean cutworm (WBC) numbers for the week ending July 11 have increased to the point where scouting for egg masses is recommended in Fulton, Henry, Lorain and Lucas counties.

Read more

 

About C.O.R.N. Newsletter

C.O.R.N. Newsletter is a summary of crop observations, related information, and appropriate recommendations for Ohio crop producers and industry. C.O.R.N. Newsletter is produced by the Ohio State University Extension Agronomy Team, state specialists at The Ohio State University and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). C.O.R.N. Newsletter questions are directed to Extension and OARDC state specialists and associates at Ohio State.

 

Contributors:

 

Glen Arnold, CCA
Field Specialist, Manure Nutrient Management

 

Mark Badertscher
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Lee Beers, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Rachel Cochran
Water Quality Extension Associate

 

Taylor Dill
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Amanda Douridas
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Nick Eckel
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mike Estadt
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Ken Ford
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Allen Gahler
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jamie Hampton
Extension Educator, ANR

 

Jason Hartschuh, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Elizabeth Hawkins
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Andrew Holden
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Alan Leininger
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Laura Lindsey
State Specialist, Soybean and Small Grains

 

David Marrison
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Jess McWatters

 

Gigi Neal
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Sarah Noggle
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Les Ober, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Pierce Paul
State Specialist, Corn and Wheat Diseases

 

Eric Richer, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Dennis Riethman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Joseph Ringler
Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Beth Scheckelhoff
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Matthew Schmerge
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Clint Schroeder
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Mark Sulc
State Specialist, Forage Production

 

Kelley Tilmon
State Specialist, Field Crop Entomology

 

Harold Watters, CPAg/CCA
Field Specialist, Agronomic Systems

 

Hallie Williams
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Ted Wiseman
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Curtis Young, CCA
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

Chris Zoller
Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources

 

The information presented here, along with any trade names used, is supplied with the understanding that no discrimination is intended and no endorsement is made by Ohio State University Extension is implied. Although every attempt is made to produce information that is complete, timely, and accurate, the pesticide user bears responsibility of consulting the pesticide label and adhering to those directions.

CFAES provides research and related educational programs to clientele on a nondiscriminatory basis. For more information, visit cfaesdiversity.osu.edu. For an accessible format of this publication, visit cfaes.osu.edu/accessibility.

Mysterious Bird Illness Strikes Ohio

 

What is Going on with the Birds? Mysterious Illness Affecting Ohio Birds

Have you seen or heard about an illness in Ohio affecting songbirds? If so, the attached handout has some information on the mysterious disease. At this time, biologists are unclear as to what is causing birds to get sick, but diagnostic laboratories, including the National Wildlife Health Center, are on the case. Check out the below publication for more information and what you can do to help.

In addition, the Ohio Division of Wildlife has created a new webpage for sharing updates and easy access to their reporting websites.