2024 Urban Food Systems Symposium 

 

The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) will host the 2024 Urban Food Systems Symposium in Columbus, Ohio, from June 11 to 13. The event includes keynotes, a grower panel, 40 presentations, a reception with more than 30 posters, a choice of off-site educational tours, and dinner at The Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory, a unique 261-acre university facility for teaching, research, and community engagement.

 

This symposium will bring together a national and international audience of academic, non-profit, government, and research-oriented professionals. Join 250 like-minded people to share and gain knowledge on how to build coalitions to adapt to this changing world and how urban food systems contribute to these solutions.

 

Keynote Presentations and General Sessions Include: (see more details)

  • Keynote Presentation: Let’s Get Dirty – Cultivating Collaboration, Policy, and Resiliency in Cities by Qiana Mickie, Executive Director of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Urban Agriculture
  • General Session: The Intersection of Climate Change and Urban Agriculture by Trent Ford, climate scientist at the Illinois State Water Survey and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign/ Illinois State Climatologist, and Carol Davis, Sustainability Manager for the Town of Blacksburg, Virginia
  • General Session: Urban Grower Panel by Jerry Hebron, co-founder of the Detroit Black Farmer Land Fund, a member of the USDA Innovative Production Committee, a member of the state Farm Service Agency committee, and the Director of the Detroit Cultivator Community Land Trust; Vincent Peterson, President and CEO of VIGEO GARDENS; and Amanda Stanfield, owner/operator of Richland County’s only urban homestead farm – GrowFourth Urban Farm
  • Capstone Presentation: Urban Farmers – A Great Benefit is Coming Our Way: A Mid Tunnel Climate Smart Growing System by Reverend Dr. Carl P. Wallace, chief operating officer of Abundant Life Farm (a non-profit entity in Akron) and serves as one of the 12 federal advisors to the Secretary of Agriculture for Urban and Innovative Agriculture Committee

Register now and book your hotel room! Registration prices increase on May 25, and hotel reservations close on May 21.
UrbanFoodSystemsSymposium.org

Early Registration Ends Friday, April 12 for the 2024 Urban Food Systems Symposium

Visit UrbanFoodSystemsSymposium.org for more information.

Act now to take advantage of early registration prices through April 12. Some tours are filling quickly, so don’t miss out on your first choice.

The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) hosts the 2024 Urban Food Systems Symposium in Columbus, Ohio on June 11-13. The event includes keynotes, a grower panel, 40 presentations, a reception with approximately 40 posters, a choice of six off-site educational tours, and dinner at The Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory, a unique 261-acre university facility for teaching, research, and community engagement. Take a look at the keynote and general session speakers we have lined up for the program.

This symposium will bring together a national and international audience of academic, non-profit, government, and research-oriented professionals. Join 300-400 like-minded people to share and gain knowledge on how to build coalitions to adapt to this changing world and how urban food systems contribute to these solutions.

Early registration pricing ends on April 12 at 11:59 p.m. ET, hotel reservations close on May 21, and registration closes on May 24.UrbanFoodSystemsSymposium.org

 

Characteristics of Ohio Women in Agriculture

By: PhD student Rae Ju and Professor Ani Katchova, Farm Income Enhancement Chair, in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics (AEDE), and Nanette (Gigi) L. Neal and Sarah Noggle, Extension Educators in Agriculture and Natural Resources in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences Department of Extension at the Ohio State University.

Click here to access the pdf version of the report.

Using data from the 2022 Census of Agriculture, the characteristics of female farmers in Ohio are examined and compared to the overall farming population.

Profile of Ohio Women Farmers

The majority of agricultural producers in Ohio are male farmers, constituting approximately two-thirds of the total, while female farmers represent about one-third. The percentage of female farmers has remained stable, with a minor decrease from 33.6% to 33.1% between 2017 and 2022.

The geographic distribution of female farmers throughout Ohio’s counties was also examined. Counties in Northwest and Southeast Ohio have a lower number of female farmers, with the number of female farmers being less than 500. However, the counties in Southeast Ohio had a relatively high proportion of female farmers, exceeding 33% of the total farming population. In contrast, the counties in Northwest Ohio had a lower percentage of female farmers (less than 33%).

The average age of female farmers in Ohio was 55.4 years, while the average age of male farmers was slightly higher at 56.8 years in 2022. Regarding the age distribution of female farmers, the data suggest a predominant concentration of farmers in the 55-64 age range. In age groups below 55 years old, the percentage of female farmers is slightly higher than that of male farmers. On the other hand, the percentage of male farmers is slightly higher than female farmers for farmers that are 65 or older. Overall, the age distribution pattern is similar for female and male farmers.

The farming occupation and off-farm employment reveal distinct differences between male and female farmers in Ohio. Only 31% of female farmers in Ohio considered farming their primary occupation in 2022, suggesting a reliance on various income sources. Additionally, 40% of female farmers in Ohio were actively involved in off-farm work for over 200 days per year.

Characteristics of Farms Operated by Female Producers

In 2022, there were 40,269 farms operated by female farmers and 72,184 farms operated by male farmers. The average size of farms operated by female farmers was 132.9 acres, in contrast to the larger average of 185.4 acres operated by male farmers. Female farmers were more likely than male farmers to operate farms that are smaller than 50 acres, while the reverse is true for farms greater than 50 acres.

Female farmers in Ohio operate a variety of farm types, including crop production, animal production, and aquaculture. Over half of the farms operated by female producers in Ohio specialized in crop farming. Specifically, 24% of the farms operated by female producers specialized in oilseed and grain, followed by 22% in other crop farming. In addition, 15% of the farms operated by female producers specialized in beef cattle ranching and farming and 14% specialized in aquaculture and other animal production in 2022. Female and male producers are more likely to specialize in crop production than livestock production.  About 55% of farms operated by female farmers in Ohio specialized in crop production which is lower than the 63% of farms operated by male farmers.

Examining land ownership patterns, full ownership was more common among female farmers, with 80% holding full ownership of their operated acres. On the other hand, 17% of female farmers were part owners of the operated acres compared to 26% for male farmers.

Female farmers predominantly appear in the lower sales categories, specifically those with sales under $25,000. Conversely, in the higher sales brackets, the representation of female farmers decreases significantly. Only 9% of female farmers had sales between $100,000 and $499,999, and 6% had sales above $500,000.

Farms with female producers in Ohio had $146,744, while farms with male producers had $213,060 in market value of agricultural products sold and government payments in 2022. Using the USDA’s definition of economic classes, the average market value of products sold from farms operated by female farmers was $145,313 on a per-farm basis. A higher percentage of female farmers than male farmers belonged to the lower economic class, specifically in the category with less than $5,000 in market value of all products sold. In contrast, the distribution pattern for male farmers is the opposite, with a more significant percentage of male farmers than female farmers in the higher economic classes.

References:

United States. (2022). U.S. Census of Agriculture. https://www.nass.usda.gov/AgCensus/

Annie’s Project Series – LAST CALL!

Women are Decision Makers – Annie’s Project Prepares Them Well

Farm women are generating a cultural tide in American agriculture that moves management, assets, and opportunities to a new wave of farmers nationwide. At Annie’s Project courses, women in agriculture become empowered to be successful through education, networks, and resources.

Annie’s Project is a six-week course that is a discussion-based workshop bringing women together to learn from experts in production, financial management, human resources, marketing, and the legal field. There’s plenty of time for questions, sharing, reacting, and connecting with presenters and fellow participants. It’s a relaxed, fun, and dynamic way to learn, grow, and meet other farmwomen. Whether new or experienced, understanding the five areas of agricultural risk, analyzing agricultural spreadsheets, and other necessary skills are vital. Learning them in a friendly environment where questions and discussion are welcomed allows the learning process to flourish.

Annie’s Project courses have reached over 15,000 farm and ranch women in 33 states. The next one in your area begins on February 29th at The Clermont County Fairgrounds.

The course costs $95 per person, including a workbook and support materials for all sessions. A light meal will be served before each class at 5:30 p.m. Course size is limited, so please register soon.

Linda, an Annie’s Project alumna says, “I took the class to gain a better understanding about agribusiness and how financial decisions impact our farm operation. I have a better understanding of balance sheets and the futures market…this class has improved communication with my spouse on concerns he works with on a daily basis.”

For more information, contact Gigi Neal at (513) 732-7070 or email neal.331@osu.edu.

To register, contact Meghan at (513) 732-7070 or in person at 1000 Locust Street, Building #324, Owensville, Ohio 45160.

AP Clermont 24

 

OSU Extension to host Eastern – Ohio Small Farm Conference– April 6, 2024

Ohio State Extension announced plans to host a Small Farm Conference in Senecaville, Ohio on April 6, 2024. The theme for this year’s Mid-Ohio Small Farm Conference is “Sowing Seeds for Success.”

Conference session topics are geared to beginning and small farm owners as well as to farms looking to diversify their operation. There will be five different conference tracks including: Horticulture and Produce Production, Business Management, Livestock, Natural Resources and new this year The Farm Kitchen.

Some conference topic highlights include: Raising Meat Rabbits, Making Goat Milk Soap, Timber Harvesting and Marketing, Basics of Growing PawPaw’s, Food Preservation Basics, Herb Vinegars, Organic Pest Management, Growing Produce with Hydroponics, Starting and Setting up a business, Solar and Wind Leasing.

Anyone interested in developing, growing or diversifying their small farm is invited to attend including market gardeners, farmers market vendors, and anyone interested in small farm living.

Attendees will have the opportunity to browse a trade show featuring the newest and most innovative ideas and services for their farming operation. The conference provides an opportunity to talk with the vendors and network with others.

The Conference will take place from 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at the Mid – East Career Technical Center Buffalo Campus 57090 Vocational Road Senecaville, Ohio 43780

For conference and registration information call OSU Extension Morrow County 419-947-1070, or OSU Extension Knox County 740-397-0401. Please follow this link to register for the conference: https://go.osu.edu/2024osusmallfarmconference

Landowner Conservation Series

Free event for all. The hands-on event is on the 1st Wednesday of each month from 6-7:30 pm. Check the schedule for topics and locations.

A partnership between OSU Extension Clermont County, Clermont Soil and Water Conservation District, and the Clermont Parks District. 

October Women in Ag Wednesday Webinar

Join us on October 11 , 2023, at 10:30 a.m. for the next session on…

Food waste & your budget?

Reducing food waste is not only good for your budget but also for the environment. Learn how meal planning , storing your food, and understanding food labels can not only save you money but also the environment.

Register at this link one time for all the series. https://go.osu.edu/wiawednesdaywebinars2023

Mental Health First Aid ®

Do you know how to identify signs of worsening mental health? Would you know how to respond and provide support if someone was experiencing a mental health crisis? Nearly one in four Ohioans experience mental health challenges. Behind every number is a friend, family member, colleague, or neighbor. Sign up for our upcoming Mental Health First Aid training and learn how to recognize signs and symptoms of mental health challenges and how to help in a mental health crisis.

Hosted in partnership with OSU Extension & Farm Bureau Brown & Clermont Counties. This is your chance to learn more about mental health in our rural community.

On Monday, July 10, 2023, from 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM at the Brown County Fairgrounds, 325 W State Street, Georgetown, Ohio 45121.

Pre-Registration for the course is required at: go.osu.edu/browncomhfa. You will be asked to complete 1.5 hours of self-paced learning online (access to materials provided approximately two weeks before training). Then, attend the interactive and engaging in-person training.

This course is valued at $170 but is FREE thanks to funding from a USDA FRSAN grant.