Early Registration Ends Friday, April 12 for the 2024 Urban Food Systems Symposium

Visit UrbanFoodSystemsSymposium.org for more information.

Act now to take advantage of early registration prices through April 12. Some tours are filling quickly, so don’t miss out on your first choice.

The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) hosts the 2024 Urban Food Systems Symposium in Columbus, Ohio on June 11-13. The event includes keynotes, a grower panel, 40 presentations, a reception with approximately 40 posters, a choice of six off-site educational tours, and dinner at The Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory, a unique 261-acre university facility for teaching, research, and community engagement. Take a look at the keynote and general session speakers we have lined up for the program.

This symposium will bring together a national and international audience of academic, non-profit, government, and research-oriented professionals. Join 300-400 like-minded people to share and gain knowledge on how to build coalitions to adapt to this changing world and how urban food systems contribute to these solutions.

Early registration pricing ends on April 12 at 11:59 p.m. ET, hotel reservations close on May 21, and registration closes on May 24.UrbanFoodSystemsSymposium.org

 

Extended Registration – Southwest Ohio Perennial School

April 5, 2024, get registered without a late fee.

Registration Information

In presentation order 


Joe Boggs – OSU Extension Hamilton County

What’s Real or Imagined?

Boxwoods (Buxus spp.) were one of the earliest plants used in North American landscapes, and their planting records date back to the mid-1600s. These deer-resistant evergreens are among our most popular landscape plants owing to their unique forms and functions in landscape designs. However, the long run of boxwoods in Ohio landscapes seems threatened by new and old diseases and a new non-native pest. Are the threats just a bump on the boxwood road or signs signaling the end of boxwoods? This presentation provides information and perspectives on the threats to boxwoods.


Curtis Young – OSU Extension Van Wert County

What’s All the Buzz About Cicadas Again?

This presentation will look at what cicadas are making the news, why they are in the news, where they might be seen in 2024, what impact they may have on perennials in landscapes, and what one may need to do to protect one’s landscape from injury. The presentation will look at their biology, species that could be encountered, how they produce damage to plants, and what to look for in 2024.


Carrie Brown – OSU Extension Fairfield County

Benefits of natives and trees for pollinators

We will start by exploring the benefits of incorporating native plants into your landscape. We will then take a look at a few native trees that your local pollinators are sure to love.


Marne Titchenell – OSU Extension Wildlife Program Director

The Good, The Bad, and the Hungry: Dealing with Wildlife in the Garden

Eaten plants, dug up bulbs, and holes in the lawn…if you spend time in the garden or landscape, you have undoubtedly encountered these issues. Many wildlife species live among us, our communities, and our backyards. Viewing these species can be enjoyable, but sometimes conflict arises. Fortunately, most wildlife damage can be managed with the right techniques and strategies.


Ashley Kulhanek – OSU Extension Medina County

Weird Things Bugs Do

Join us to learn about common and not-so-common insects and some of their strange and endearing behaviors happening in yards across Ohio.

Southwest Ohio Perennial School

Get registered today for the 30th Southwest Ohio Perennial School on April 11, 2024, at the 4-H Hall on the Clermont County Fairgrounds.

In presentation order 

Joe Boggs – OSU Extension Hamilton County

What’s Real or Imagined?

Boxwoods (Buxus spp.) were one of the earliest plants used in North American landscapes, and their planting records date back to the mid-1600s. These deer-resistant evergreens are among our most popular landscape plants owing to their unique forms and functions in landscape designs. However, the long run of boxwoods in Ohio landscapes seems threatened by new and old diseases and a new non-native pest. Are the threats just a bump on the boxwood road or signs signaling the end of boxwoods? This presentation provides information and perspectives on the threats to boxwoods.

Curtis Young – OSU Extension Van Wert County

What’s All the Buzz About Cicadas Again?

This presentation will look at what cicadas are making the news, why they are in the news, where they might be seen in 2024, what impact they may have on perennials in landscapes, and what one may need to do to protect one’s landscape from injury. The presentation will look at their biology, species that could be encountered, how they produce damage to plants, and what to look for in 2024.

Carrie Brown – OSU Extension Fairfield County

Benefits of natives and trees for pollinators

We will start by exploring the benefits of incorporating native plants into your landscape. We will then take a look at a few native trees that your local pollinators are sure to love.

Marne Titchenell – OSU Extension Wildlife Program Director

The Good, The Bad, and the Hungry: Dealing with Wildlife in the Garden

Eaten plants, dug up bulbs, and holes in the lawn…if you spend time in the garden or landscape, you have undoubtedly encountered these issues. Many wildlife species live among us, our communities, and our backyards. Viewing these species can be enjoyable, but sometimes conflict arises. Fortunately, most wildlife damage can be managed with the right techniques and strategies.

Ashley Kulhanek – OSU Extension Medina County

Weird Things Bugs Do

Join us to learn about common and not-so-common insects and some of their strange and endearing behaviors happening in yards across Ohio.

 

30th Southwest Ohio Perennial School

Get registered today for the 30th Southwest Ohio Perennial School on April 11, 2024, at the 4-H Hall on the Clermont County Fairgrounds.

 

Joe Boggs – OSU Extension Hamilton County

What’s Real or Imagined?

Boxwoods (Buxus spp.) were one of the earliest plants used in North American landscapes, and their planting records date back to the mid-1600s. These deer-resistant evergreens are among our most popular landscape plants owing to their unique forms and functions in landscape designs. However, the long run of boxwoods in Ohio landscapes seems threatened by new and old diseases and a new non-native pest. Are the threats just a bump on the boxwood road or signs signaling the end of boxwoods? This presentation provides information and perspectives on the threats to boxwoods.

Curtis Young – OSU Extension Van Wert County

What’s All the Buzz About Cicadas Again?

This presentation will look at what cicadas are making the news, why they are in the news, where they might be seen in 2024, what impact they may have on perennials in landscapes, and what one may need to do to protect one’s landscape from injury. The presentation will look at their biology, species that could be encountered, how they produce damage to plants, and what to look for in 2024. 

Carrie Brown – OSU Extension Fairfield County

Benefits of natives and trees for pollinators

We will start by exploring the benefits of incorporating native plants into your landscape. We will then take a look at a few native trees that your local pollinators are sure to love.   

Marne Titchenell – OSU Extension Wildlife Program Director

The Good, The Bad, and the Hungry: Dealing with Wildlife in the Garden

Eaten plants, dug up bulbs, and holes in the lawn…if you spend time in the garden or landscape, you have undoubtedly encountered these issues. Many wildlife species live among us, our communities, and our backyards. Viewing these species can be enjoyable, but sometimes conflict arises. Fortunately, most wildlife damage can be managed with the right techniques and strategies.

Ashley Kulhanek – OSU Extension Medina County

Weird Things Bugs Do

Join us to learn about common and not-so-common insects and some of their strange and endearing behaviors happening in yards across Ohio.  

Online Fruit Pruning School

Pruning 2024 The Ohio State University South Centers is hosting its popular, two-part (morning and afternoon) Online Fruit Pruning School on Thursday, March 14, 2024. This FREE online event will be conducted virtually via the Zoom communications platform.

Part 1 on March 14 will be from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. and will focus on pruning fruit trees, including apples and peaches. Part 2 will be held later that same day from 1 to 2:30 p.m. and will cover small fruits like grapes and raspberries.

Please register by Monday, March 11, 2024. Simply visit the link below and fill out the registration form. We also plan on offering recordings afterward so you can access the event on-demand, as we know this better fits some people’s schedules.

Register here: http://go.osu.edu/pruningschool.

For even more information, consult the attached flyer.

Looking forward to seeing you (virtually) again this year!

Register for the 30th Southwest Ohio Perennial School

Ohio State University Extension Clermont County will host the 30th Southwest Ohio Perennial School on April 11 at 9 a.m. at the Clermont County Fairground’s 4-H Hall, 1000 Locust Street, Owensville, OH.

The event will feature educational presentations with a tradeshow staffed by regional vendors and gardening organizations.

Topics this year will focus on local horticulture concerns and upcoming events. “Wildlife and your Landscape” Marne Titchenell, OSU Extension Wildlife Specialist; “Boxwoods and their Issues” Joe Boggs, OSU Extension Hamilton County; “Cicadas and your landscape” Curtis Young, OSU Extension Van Wert County; “Benefits of natives and trees for pollinators” Carrie Brown, OSU Extension Fairfield County; and “Weird Things Bugs Do” Ashley Kulhanek, OSU Extension Medina County.

Registration is due on or before April 1, 2024. Registration includes the program, continental breakfast, buffet lunch, refreshments, handouts, and door prize tickets. For additional inquiries, contact Meghan at 513-732-7070.

Participant Registrartion

Vendor Registration

Landowner Conservation Series

Free event for all. The hands-on event is on the 1st Wednesday of each month from 6-7:30 pm. Check the schedule for topics and locations.

A partnership between OSU Extension Clermont County, Clermont Soil and Water Conservation District, and the Clermont Parks District. 

Potager Article #11

A series of articles presented by Candy Horton, an OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer

This last week, I spent a bit of time in the garden, checking the plants in the cold frame and the radishes and measuring out the next phase of this project. I have been able to harvest radishes through December 17th. Because the temperatures have been as mild as they have been, the radishes are still growing but are now taking longer to get to the size for harvesting. I was concerned about the seeds that I had planted around December 1st. However, they are growing very slowly, and I’m hopeful they will grow to full maturity for harvesting. I may need to add a second layer of the frost covering with the temperatures getting colder.

Dr. Timothy McDermott of The Ohio State Extension in Franklin County says that for ordinary winter harvesting, I need to have my seeds planted by the end of September to harvest during this time frame. I will implement that next year; my goal is to see how far into the winter I can go with planting seeds to have crops to harvest. I also want to see what the seeds will do if anything when the days start getting longer, and the soil starts warming up. That way, I will know what I can plant in the fall for early spring harvests, what will work, and how late I can plant seeds. If I don’t try, how do I know?

I have also started planning the next phase of my garden. The first section is 16′ wide by about 30′ long, and the only thing left to do in that space is to finish putting down mulch and adding pots for flowers and maybe some dwarf blueberry bushes. I will be working on the middle or central section of the Potager Garden next. In a historical Potager Garden, the garden would be divided into four equal sections, with a single path running horizontally and one running vertically through the garden’s center. In the middle of the garden, where both paths meet, there would be a water feature; looking from above, the paths would make a cross with the water feature in the center of the cross. This design represented many religious beliefs and ideologies. This would also have a seating area for guests to enjoy the water feature, nature, and the garden’s quiet. In my garden, I will be placing another cold frame along the back of the garden. Two insect hotels will be on either side of the cold frame to invite good insects into the garden. I will build an in-ground worm farm, a stock tank pond, and two types of seating to invite people into the garden. The space will be smaller than the two outer sections because I want to have as much growing space as possible and a place to sit, rest, and enjoy the garden.

The first thing to be done in the center section is to lay down broken-down cardboard boxes and add mulch. This will kill off any weeds and will decompose back into the soil. I put newspaper and mulch in the pathways in the first section, which is lovely. It holds more moisture in the soil. It doesn’t get muddy during the rain, allowing me to work in the beds and cold frames whenever possible. The second things I will be adding in as soon as possible are the insect hotels. I want them in place to be available for the new season insects as spring arrives. I have lots of materials in the yard that I am gathering for them; it’s now a matter of putting them together. The next project will be the worm farm. This is another form of composting that will add beneficial elements to the soil. I have read many articles about having a worm farm in my garage and have hesitated a lot. I recently found some articles about worm farms that are kept in the ground that allow the worms not only to compost most of your food waste but also to move out into your soil and add benefits to it directly. The most significant element of this section will be the stock tank pond and seating area. But until then, I wish you all a Happy New Year and best wishes for you and your families.

MGV Demonstration Garden Summary 8/10 – 8/12

General

The last three days have been cool for August. We got 1.5” of rain on Wednesday night and the following days were in the mid to low 80s. I didn’t need to water because of the rain and cool temperatures. Plus, rain is forecasted for later today. I picked up trash around all the gardens (probably left over from the county fair) and weeded a little. Weeds are pretty minimal this year. Lasagna mulching the paths around the beds was a great idea!

Harvest

I harvested 7.4 LBS of Mariana Paste Tomatoes, 3 LBS of Blue Lake Pole Beans and 3.5 LBS of Early Jalapeños. Tomatoes and peppers are coming in strong and will probably need a big harvest next week. The potato foliage is starting to brown, which hopefully means that we will be able to harvest soon. Dumping out the laundry baskets and finding them full of potatoes should be fun.

I ran into Becky from the SNAP-Ed Program and she was headed over to make salsa with residents of the senior center. She was very excited that she was able to get most of her ingredients from our garden!

 

 

Problems and Pests

Most of the tomato plants in a garden are showing signs of early blight. The Mariana tomato plants appear to be the worst, but are still producing a lot of fruit.

 

There were all stages of squash bugs on the Golden Glory Summer Squash plants. I manually removed some by knocking them into a cup of soapy water, but squash bugs tend to be an ongoing battle.

There is also evidence of animal activity in the garden. There appeared to be bite marks in some of the fruit. I had to cull 4 Super Beef Steak tomatoes and one 3 LBS Liberty Squash which had bite marks out of them. (Please note my use of terminology from our recent GAP training. LOL.)

 

The Strike Green Beans had evidence of insect damage on the leaves, but I didn’t see any insects. Both trial green beans fruit appear very spotty, especially when compared to the pole beans. Many of the issues facing the garden seem to be related to the wet summer we are having.

Notable

The iron weed is coming into bloom in the sensory garden and looks fabulous! I saw a black swallowtail fluttering nearby.

The herb garden also looks amazing! It provided me with all sorts of inspiration for something at my own house.

 

Overall the garden seems to be producing really well. Hopefully we will get a few good sunny days soon to dry things out.

 

Happy Gardening,

Johanna, OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Clermont County

Potager Article #9

A series of articles presented by Candy Horton, an OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteer

Over the past couple of months while dealing with a knee injury and surgery I have been reflecting on my garden project. I thought I would be in a much different place with this project than I am. I had some unrealistic expectations considering my situation but also in how my situation has changed over the past few years. Because of my situation I need to change my decision-making process.

Let me share what I mean and what I have had to reconsider. I have had a vegetable garden in the location I have chosen for the potager garden for years. During that time, we always had cats and dogs and there was lots of help in working in the garden. With becoming an empty nester and my knee injury, I have been hindered in how much I could do so the garden is not as far along as I had pictured it to be. The compost bins are working well. I have the leaves decomposing in the first bin and what I have in there, I will be moving into the bed that will be sitting fallow over the winter, making room for this fall’s leaves. The animal feeder that I was using for lettuce, carrots, radishes, and spinach worked great too. The plans were to plant seeds every other week and continue the planting and harvesting process all year round. The problem that showed up was that there was not enough room for all the plants using the continual process as often as I had planned. I think that if I were to plant only one type of plant and plant the seeds in the spacing that they need, I will not have to thin out seedlings and I would be able to plant enough rows to continually plant and harvest without any issues. I will be able to put hoops and plastic over that bed to continue the growing season throughout the rest of the year and into the next.

The bed that I planted my onions in has been doing well and I have been able to continually harvest onions all throughout the season. I will be planting more this week and into the fall. I am clearing another bed to get the garlic in by the end of September. The tomatoes and peppers that I have planted have not done well and that is where the cats and dogs come into consideration. For the past two years I have really loved watching the bunnies playing and scampering around in my yard, I did not even connect that they would love to eat my plants, nor did I consider the moles that are setting up house in my yard. In all the years that we have lived here, we have never had to contend with these issues because we have always had barn cats and my Yorkie. They both loved to hunt and dig in the yard which drove me crazy, but I now realize served a greater good for my gardens. This new issue will change how I plan my garden and what I will need to do to protect it from the animals that I share this garden with.

Another issue that I realized that I must overcome is my own thought process. I would get frustrated with something and realize that I am still thinking in seasonal planting timelines. With the year-round garden method, you are always planting and harvesting something all year long. It is more a matter of how you are managing the planting, harvesting, and caring for the plants that are different. For example, with it now being August, I need to start looking at what I want to harvest all winter. What I need to do to protect those crops through the winter and how they will grow during that time. For example, lettuce, I will need to make sure to have row covers over those beds with plastic that can handle snow and winter temperatures. I also need to get them planted soon so that they will have plenty of time to get a good root base before it gets cold. I also need to take into consideration that it will take the plants longer to get to the point that it can be harvested during the cold winter months. And the last thing that I realize that I must work on is the idea that nothing in the garden is a failure. It is more of a lesson learned.